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Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. tensop

    tensop Member

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    with current technology we can easily get your body there :)
     
    Groff, millsy, NSanity and 1 other person like this.
  2. HobartTas

    HobartTas Member

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    300 baud Decwriter perhaps? How about a 110 baud Teletype?
     
  3. shredder

    shredder Member

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    That's 1 tweet plaintext transmitted in about 20 seconds, if my deranged middle-of-night calculations are correct.

    It sucked because you couldn't do anything cool*, but it was cool because other people couldn't do anything that sucked.

    *not structly true is ut, but zing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2020
  4. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Most acoustic couplers in the day could go as high as 1200 but most only managed 300.

    Welcome to the late 1970s early 1980s internet.
     
  5. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    But how long would it take to load the front page of twitter?
     
  6. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I read a little while back that in order to load a 280 character tweet on a modern browser, the actual data transferred (images, stylesheets, code, javascript, etc) exceeds that of the entire collection of Tolstoy encoded in plain ASCII text.

    I've not tested the claim. But I wouldn't at all be surprised if it was true.
     
  7. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    How much is that in African elephants?
     
  8. shredder

    shredder Member

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    That'd be a Heisenberg multiplied by a Schrodinger.
     
  9. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    not surprising at all, modern websites are horrible bloated - most of it not related to the content you actually want.

    this one tweet page https://twitter.com/BOM_ACT/status/1212477361200992261/ for me was 2.78MB, War and Peace has 587,287 words (https://wordcounter.net/blog/2016/10/28/102640_how-many-words-is-war-and-peace.html) can't find a character count :(

    So for twitter home page to be bigger, each word in W&P would need to average less than 4 characters.

    the signal to noise ratio is very poor.
     
    elvis likes this.
  10. shredder

    shredder Member

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    Variations of Parkinson's Law e.g. data expands to fill the space available for storage.
     
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  11. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Hey remember when Equifax got breached, lost millions of personal records, knew about it and lied about it for 6 months, had their CIO dump stock in blatant insider trading (and got done for it), and all because of patching they put off for over a year?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equifax#May–July_2017_data_breach

    That was 2017. What happened since? Well their stock took a dive by 21% the following year. The year after - back up 50% again.
    https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/why-equifax-stock-climbed-50.5-in-2019-2020-01-12

    So all in all, nobody got punished (other than the one CIO for insider trading), and only the customers lost out long term.

    Bring on GDPR level punishment worldwide.
     
  12. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    Who has been punished for GDPR breaches? and what has the punishment been?
     
  13. CptVipeR

    CptVipeR Member

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    There are some services that convert to low-bandwidth text only (or text and small thumbnails)

    easychirp.com loaded my twitter feed in 1.1MB. Compared to full fat twitter at 8.5MB.
    There are also apps for mobile Twitter Lite https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.twitter.android.lite&hl=en_AU

    It's retro in a way of how twitter would look in Netscape Navigator...
     
  14. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Maximum fine is 20 million Euro, or 4% of annual worldwide turnover, whichever is greater (and there have been MUCH greater fines).

    Notable fines:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GDPR_fines_and_notices

    As a few notable security professionals have said (and I agree with), GDPR should be consider just the start. We need to get far more heavy handed about this as time goes on, and as data both grows in worldwide storage and usage, and skyrockets in value at scale to criminals. Companies have no moral compass. They only listen to dollars. So the dollars lost to the company have to match the pain level of the money and identity theft to their customers.

    What's lagging currently is a gross understanding by most governments worldwide as to why the data is so precious to us, and so valuable to the bad guys.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
  15. millsy

    millsy Member

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    Until stuff like this actually hurts execs it's never gonna change much. Look at how many orgs pay ransomware demands. Sure a few get burned, but they're often cheaper than doing it security right.
     
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  16. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    I didn't ask what the Maximum punishment was.

    I asked Who has been punished, and what punishment did they receive.

    Equifax were fined $500M+
     
  17. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Exactly. The pain level must match.

    There are plenty of cases where individuals end up with people impersonating them, either directly stealing money, or worse, destroying their credit rating through false loans all over the place.

    The company responsible for that level of long term, high impact negative outcome needs to suffer at least to the same level in order to make decisions to avoid it repeating itself make their way all the way to the board.

    I gave you the fines list in the link. Click it. Read it.

    Under GDPR, Equifax would have been fined far more than USD$500M. It was the largest single breach in history up to that point in time - orders of magnitude larger than the ones listed. If that had happened on EU soil, they'd be fined far more. And that's still not enough to make them give a fuck.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
  18. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    Until there is a case like that punished under GDPR, Color me skeptical that its any different/better.

    From your link -
    Marriott - 339 Million Guest Records - $99 Milion fine.
    Equifax was only 145 Million... 1/2 the Users, 5x the Fine.
     
  19. shredder

    shredder Member

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    Are the records like-for-like, is the question. Some data must have more value than others.
     
  20. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    company wants me to submit to a background check run by 'HireRight' quick google shows them (and their subsidiaries) have been involved in numerous breaches over the past 10 years, and class actions for misleading/incorrect results.

    I'm telling the boss to fuck off on that one.
    (I already hold gov clearance which is much more strict that anything HireRight can do).
     
    elvis likes this.

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