Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Oh I understand just fine.

    My current workload is 50% private, 50% public sectors. Watching the contrast every day is part of the lolz. And that's not just "public sucks" either. For every gov O365 or Jira thing that's well done, there's some ancient piece of shit huge private logistics industry RDP shitware thing. Both sides have their sins.

    But, proper cloud, not shitware RDP kludge, is winning. It's growing bigger, it's winning contacts, it's seeing new development. The old RDP shitware shrinks every day, and with it, the shitty IT staff who can't move on with it. And this makes me happy.
     
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  2. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Since early 1990's and newgroups readers became mainstream, cloud jerking hit mainstream... and loving it. ;)
     
  3. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    Really just being a webapp means sweet FA with respect to the Cloud too, that shit can be served from anywhere. If that is all businesses are doing then just man up and say it is outsourcing their DC/infrastructure. There is nothing wrong with that if the business risk/benefit/cost justification is there.

    Call it Cloud if you're actually implementing a solution that scales or moves across DCs/regions.

    Dropping a webapp in some AWS VMs with a tunnel back to the office for some integration points and calling it Cloud is such a cop out. It also causes anti-cloud sentiment when it runs slow, falls over or similar, and kicks the cost can down the road when the next CIO has to tell the rest of the Exec they need more OPEX budget to implement some redundancy.

    /rant
     
  4. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    The point is though killing the on prem teams, CAPEX tin and salaries. Its basically financial engineering-driven. Costs more but hidden as OPEX = thumbs up, for some unknown reason. Also its effort to hire, retain and manage a good infra team. You need less of those fkin' nerds in the cloud and that is a huge driver. Nevermind that ultimately cost may not be saved, at least you don't have to talk to those fkin nerds anymore
     
  5. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    Gutsy question. You're a shark. Sharks are winners, and they don't look back because they have no necks. Necks are for sheep.
     
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  6. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Not just salaries in general. But the "IT toilet cleaner" salaries.

    The gold rush pre-2000 for grossly underqualified people getting into IT was enormous, and I remember so many people jumping ship from either other careers or dropping out of studies to get in on the Y2K "find and replace XX with 19XX" money making scheme at the time. What happened as a result was the market was flooded with people who had no place in the technology industries suddenly rocking up with what looked like good experience, but really were more harmful to the industry.

    From there, companies took advantage, and the low cost IT boom started. Bean counters are only good at counting beans, and the race to the bottom meant that companies judged worthiness on how low someone would go on a salary rather than what skillset they brought to the company.

    Where did we end up? With 20 years of technical debt, because IT projects are too hard. Endless whining from businesses at how difficult upgrades are, how hard it is to stay current, to patch, to upskill mouth-breathers.

    A big part of my love for cloud is that there's a higher minimum buy in. It's not impossible to bullshit your way through a good deployment, but it's getting a whole lot harder. That, and with new deployment tools, one good person is now a far more obvious cost benefit to beancounters than an army of morons was a decade ago.

    Whether or not this positive trend continues, I don't know. I've definitely been bitten by this before where I'd hoped some magic thing would come along and force people to stop being shit at their jobs. But so far this cloud thing is doing a better job than all the other things before it.

    With any luck, we'll all be replaced by cloud tools and automation soon, and the problem that is people in IT will be fixed once and for all.
     
  7. Unframed

    Unframed Member

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    I'm too young to have been involved in the Y2K boom (was in year 6 at the time) but to this day I still deal with older blokes who have coasted on the back of the early 00s IT boom. They'll constantly talk about how they've been using x software for 20 years but still can't manage basic tasks. Can't wait for that part of IT to get necrotic and fall off.
     
  8. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    Not just Y2K but outsourcing as well. Same thing, a massive wave of people getting into IT for the $ and who had no natural aptitude or interest. Combine with Win2k GUI and voila
     
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  9. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Yup, they're the ones. I want to see them all gone.

    Definitely seeing a hell of a lot of outsourced crap getting replaced with cloud. Marvelous!
     
  10. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    you do realise that as an open source evangelist you're cheering on a monopoly / duopoly (one of whom was the traditional evil empire, no less)?

    (rubs hands and waits for the day when they decide that they've killed enough of the competition and start jacking up prices)
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2021
  11. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Guess who's paying all the open source people to make open source?
     
  12. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    I get what you're saying, but no they're not paying ALL of them. There are lot of small businesses and their devs also chipping in and pushing things along, and some of those are still running their own physical kit.
     
  13. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    IBM? The guy who owns the Mavericks? (I jest, I jest)
     
  14. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Sure, and I don't think cloud vendors can kill them off any more than the big fat tin slingers from the last 30 years could kill them off.
     
  15. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    IBM did and is still doing great things for Open Source. Without IBM, Microsoft and its its back door cronies would have buried the Linux Kernel with the SCO lawsuits, IBM said here are all our patents they are free to use as prior art to sink SCO's claim they own UNIX and therefore Linux. MS was hand in hand with the original lawsuit and even tried to stop Linux with their patent pool. People may have warm fuzzies with the wolf in sheep clothing that is Microsoft "Openess" but I for one won't be fooled.

    IBM may be a joke today because of their outsourcing efforts, but they still play a very important role past and present in championing Open Source.
     
  16. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Open source isn't going any where. Every vendor on planet Earth is critically dependent on it.

    Imagine having to reinvent *EVERTHING* from scratch over and over again. We'd quite literally grind to a technology standstill.

    Business demands progress occurs way faster than proprietary software can keep up with. If people were forced from a legal/contract/licensing standpoint to reinvent the wheel on every single project, that would be the end of computer driven business as we know it.

    I have zero concerns over the future of open source, even with the biggest arsehole companies only getting bigger and more arseholey.
     
  17. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    IBM is a strange beast.

    Great R&D divisions; they do some real cool shit at the forefront of science (not just IT, but the materials science/physics needed for the future),

    they just struggle to commercialise those things (and when they do have a success, they sell it off to Lenovo). they need to keep a cash cow around so they can still do the R&D.
     
  18. ewok85

    ewok85 Member

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    And why wouldn't you? I run a small business and we have zero physical infrastructure that is critical. Sure, you have issues with cloud but that's the cloud providers problem to scramble around and worry about.

    I love not having to deal with updates, and redundancy, and hardware failures, and circuit issues, and premises problems. I get paid to deal with other peoples problems and the whole time I'm just thinking "glad I don't have to deal with this BS"

    The other huge advantage is that budgets are rediculously stable. I know exactly what my annual IT costs will be because there is no surprises.
     
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  19. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    yes, for any business below mid-market its a no brainer, and even for mid-market it makes sense for a majority of functions.
     
  20. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    So much all of this. Every single reason you've listed here is why I'm pushing everything this way.

    The classic counter is "downtime", but shit, the actual biggest business risk today is ransomeware and lack of patching, and that's now zero concern.

    The only other plus I'd add is trivial scale up and down. No buying licences in 5+ packs, or buying them outright for temporary staff. Flexible month to month pay-for-what-you-use pricing is mandatory for places that aren't enormous bloated corporates (which are a shitload of places, by both number of business and number of humans).
     

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