Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. j3ll0

    j3ll0 Member

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    Definitely.

    I like to make it my job to take an intray, and then turn that in to an endless array of excuses why said intray hasn't been done.

    and they say IT isn't a creative exercise...*scoff*

    .
     
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  2. millsy

    millsy Member

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    Man one thing I HATE about being on the blue side is just perpetually seeing all the horrible habits of shitmins, windows was a mistake
     
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  3. mooboyj

    mooboyj Member

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    I start my Grad Cert in Data Analytics today (I have a Bachelor of Economics so it isn't a huge stretch for me). Hoping to be full time in a data role by the middle of next year and never have to deal with the shitshow that modern IT has become!
     
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  4. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    CLI stuff used to have an intellectual barrier to entry, which was nice. These days any idiot can and does copy/pasta from stackoverflow, so the volume of shitmins is growing.

    Not as bad as the old "right click to victory" crowd yet, but it's getting there.

    This is the way.
     
  5. wazza

    wazza Member

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    One thing I hate about being a shitmin is seeing all of the horrible habits of shitmins. So many people who have no business being in IT because they're so bad, yet so many of them own their own small IT businesses and other business owners think they're great because they had no idea what they actually need, so as long as they can't see that it's on fire (it is...they just don't know it yet) they're happy.
     
  6. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    IT was a mistake
     
  7. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    no, users was the mistake.

    IT was fine before the barriers to entry were reduced too much.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Cue my standard response that public IT literacy peaked around 2010, and has been going backwards since.

    And no surprises, take a look at this graph of PC sales:
    12578.jpeg

    Worth noting that numbers are increasing again due to work/study from home requirements with COVID, but I am still 100% convinced that a post-COVID world will look exactly the same as a pre-COVID world, and I'm already seeing pointy-haired-bosses screaming from the rooftops to get humans back in offices at any cost, because they utterly loathe work-from-home, and despite all this feelgood kumbaya around the mental health benefits of flexible workplaces, it will never stick. The almighty god that is capitalism ensures that worker flexibility will never happen.

    Back to computer literacy - we've seen a double whammy in both mobile computing (specifically phones and tablets) now being more than adequate for day-to-day computing. You can do your e-commerce/netbanking/online-buying as well as video chat to your boss/grandma on a phone, so no more need for desktops. The second part of that double whammy is that operating systems are, to their credit, easier and more reliable than ever, but also more locked down than ever. Options continue to be removed (and are marketed in the name of "ease of use", but more realistically are about user control). And even things like the ultimate "wanker who works from a cafe" toy, the mighty MacBook, is ever closing in on being a glorified tablet with an OS you can't even really customise (and when it breaks, just "Internet Recovery + iCloud restore" your way to victory).

    Is this a bad thing? I dunno. I've long said that if computers worked as advertised we'd all be out of the job, and that would be a good thing. But then I see a world full of people who can't do basic shit like print or export to PDF or organise a meeting through an online calendar because they've fallen out of touch with the basic logic processes needed to operate a computer, and I'm left wondering if "simple" really is a good thing. As the saying goes, make something idiot proof, and they'll make a better idiot.
     
  9. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    saw something recently, on how Uni students don't know what a directory/folder is. https://www.pcgamer.com/students-dont-know-what-files-and-folders-are-professors-say/

    that's all well and good for the sheeple that are nothing but consumers, but when a uni has to add a course to teach people the utmost basic computer principles, there's been multiple failures along the way.

    and I'm not some grey beard yelling at clouds, I make use of the very technologies to tag/organise my photos etc. it's a great tool. but I still have my shit organised in directories.

    having schools fully drinking to iThing koolaid and teaching on the ultra dumbed down buy/consume-stuff-now platform. it'll as you rightly point out keep getting worse.
     
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  10. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Well there's your problem. Academia, Government and Business have all relied on corporates to educate users, opting to put zero effort into training.

    The explosion in popularity of the iDevice meant that dumbing down devices for your average numpty to get on social media, which then proliferated to every executive wanting a sexy iDevice at work, totally drove adoption based on what was sexy rather than what was functional.

    Business loves to bitch about skills shortages, but never wants to put a cent into training. Academia loves to put international students into worthless courses and take their money, but never seems to want to actually satisfy business demand.

    Are we surprised we've landed here? Not in the slightest.

    I look forward to today's inevitable "skills shortage" rant from techbro leadership.
     
  11. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    My brother has been seeing this for about 5 years now, people come in for a trial and cannot navigate a Windows file system.

    These are people applying for signwrting gig so need to be able to create and save eps files for a plotter to cut or send files to a cnc machine etc. I get tradies arent always the most computer literate people but it's all been forced down their throat as an app these days
     
  12. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    Sounds like the sign writing industry needs to move with the times instead of trying to hold back the tide with their antiquated systems.
     
  13. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Apple don't make CNC machines.
    or large format printers.

    people need to be less dumb.
     
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  14. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Had a conversation with someone today where they were quite literally shitty at "the IT industry" for not making computers that just allow people to imagine shit and it happens.

    I tried to inform them that if computers were that capable, we could do without the humans all together and just let computers build shit more efficiently. But I don't think they quite grokked that leap.
     
  15. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I screened someone for a basic tech support position some years ago. our turnover rate of tier 1 staff sent by the labour hire contractor we were using was horrendous. I got tasked with filtering the proposed intake. this person was presented as a masters of computer science.

    this was for a customer remote support position setting up broadband on Windows PCs - USB/ethernet connection, wifi dongle, put CD in and talk customer through install wizard etc. I gave candidates a brief proficiency demonstration test - act as both a customer and the support person and follow the support instructions that CSRs used to a successful outcome. this person had very little idea of how to use a mouse, had zero idea of window file structure, couldn't locate a USB port on the 2006 era office PC. when questioned, this person's entire qualifications were obtained in a Unix CLI environment.
     
  16. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius Member

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    I was greeted by this on a clients pc the other day:

    [​IMG]



    I think it's more than the article assumes though, that users just use search. People who have their screens cluttered up like this tend to actually go to the desktop to find their files and get seriously pissed if you move them.
     
  17. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    a cluttered desktop is the sign of a cluttered mind.

    my desktop is like my heart, pure black.
     
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  18. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    I've had more than one user tell me that they use the deleted items folder in their outlook to store important emails that they're still working on.
     
  19. Schred

    Schred Member

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    That’s actually very common. I learned the hard way that doing an “empty recycle bin” on all user mailboxes before an Exchange migration could be dangerous.

    I find it totally bizarre and can’t fathom the logic. I’m told that the users who do this view the delete button as a button that makes an email “go to some other place, where I can find it again” with a single click.
     
  20. scips

    scips Member

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    The ultimate FU for me is those LUNATICS that move the startbar elsewhere.....
     

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