Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. Daemon

    Daemon Member

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    I've worked with some fairly clueless, non-technical PM's who were walking hand grenades when it came to management. Yet, I still can't think of any who could miss the mark so badly :)

    Client not knowing what they want is very possible.

    However, the nobody having built one before just seems crazy. A mobile app with a remote platform crunching data isn't exactly unique. Even if the client couldn't specify it properly, it sounds like it was built but just without scale in mind (despite 11 DB Servers).

    I think Mitt Romney needs to fund a trip for an OCAU led investigation. We'll all charge $5k a day for our services (+ travel + expenses) and after 6 weeks we'll give them a glossy report and tells them one server not being tested properly was never going to work :)
     
  2. Unframed

    Unframed Member

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    Getting an angry text from management because the 3 people (myself included) who ran support taking in over 111 cases in 2 days while there were critical failures didn't make descriptive enough notes...
     
  3. IACSecurity

    IACSecurity Member

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    Can't say I can agree with the first comment.

    I just finished work on a $100+million IT project. It was over time (by years). But, it was on budget, and (generally) on scope. The PM (program... manager) was not at all technical. And was fucking brilliant.
    I would raise 'risks' (as was my job), the response would be "good, lets go to the board - but explain this shit to me easy like".

    Didn't need any technical skills at all. Didn't have any, just had a bunch of people that did, and listened to them, and helped work out the priorities of everyone's needs. (eg your #1)
    Would happily work with again, in fact would actively seek out working with them in future. A rare sentiment.


    On the flip side, I have worked with technical PM's, and they were shit. In fact a technical PM (subordinate to the Program Manager) on that project above.. was shit, and got fired... along with many other technical PM's that couldn't PM, went through them like pairs of socks... one a day :)

    To further flip, I have also worked with technical PM's and they have been great, but never a technical Program Manager.. at that point, I think the Program/Project management requirements outway technical competency.
     
  4. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    111 Separate cases of Critical failures? or 1 Critical Failure that resulted in 111 tickets raised?

    If its the former, I pity you, if its the later, the first ticket gets the info, to other 110 get closed with See #<first ticket number>
     
  5. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I don't think I was clear. There was no "first comment", but rather the two itemised options after that:
    No, PMs and other project stakeholders most certainly don't need technical knowledge. But they do need to listen to experts.

    Option (1) frequently results in positive outcomes (in agreement with your own anecdote above, and many projects I've seen first hand). Option (2) frequently results in clusterfucks (sadly, also many projects I've seen first hand).

    The problem is that option (2) appears to happen more and more frequently these days, and on bigger and bigger projects with deeper impacts. I'm quite interested to find out why. My theories are that PMs and middle management are over-assuming their understanding of technology based on their own pride in trivial technical abilities ("I can set up Facebook on my iPad without needing the help of my kids, I misut be some sort of technical genius!" syndrome).

    Likewise, this common belief that when technical folk bring up risks, it's just "negativity". I've lost count of the number of places I've worked where that general attitude around IT exists, particularly when (again, see (2) above) complex projects are massively underestimated in time, effort and dollars by project leads who don't want to approach technical experts because the feedback will be "negative".

    While I appreciate a positive project lead, there's a world of difference between being positive, and being blissfully (and dangerously) ignorant.
     
  6. Unframed

    Unframed Member

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    111 seperate cases of different severity, backup failures, BSODs, server down etc. The critical failure was on our end which meant certain software wouldn't activate so there was a new call every couple of seconds about activation failures too which all needed to be returned once our end was fixed. It was an absolute madhouse.
     
  7. FiShy

    FiShy Member

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    Technical PMs are the worst as they normally failed at being purely technical so moved to being a PM and tend to only know enough to be dangerous.
     
  8. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    All PMs should know just enough to ensure they're not completely ignorant and can speak to the client. Once they're approaching the limits of their understanding they should have the nous to seek guidance from those more qualified.
     
  9. Urbansprawl

    Urbansprawl Member

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    Actually what you need is a person who is both strongly technically and a good PM, but those guys and girls start at $5k a day :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2014
  10. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    bloody ACS website - that time of year again renewing membership (I don't pay for it)

    any sort of form error checking just fail leaves you in limbo when processing payments

    click anything and you need to wait 10-20 seconds for something to happen - no state indicators to inform the user

    address checking is just fail

    can't even access MySFIA without having authorization fail

    I see a pattern of fail :Paranoid:
     
  11. mr626

    mr626 Member

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    Pretty much. Haven't heard much good about them from anyone in the industry. Not surprised their own website has issues.

    Then again, I've never been a member. What am I missing :confused:
     
  12. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    a bucketload of mailing list emails that get filtered to a folder that I never look at

    and $352 less beer money
     
  13. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Pretty much. If you read some of those emails you can get some free lunches on occasion.

    Membership (which includes an Ambassador card membership) has saved me a bundle on car rentals in the past though.

    Plus work pays, so no skin off my nose.
     
  14. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    mmm... free lunches are good.... free beers are better :p

    Remember looking at the Ambassador card benefits card a few years back and thinking it was pretty crappy for the things I wanted (ACT dining). Rentals & accommodation I have corp rates for. But yeah, nice of work to pay for a card that gets me a 5% discount on gift cards :lol:
     
  15. cyclobs

    cyclobs Member

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    It was at one point but it's a highly manual task.
     
  16. GiantGuineaPig

    GiantGuineaPig Member

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    I was a member for a year, got absolutely nothing out of it.
     
  17. Jase

    Jase Member

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    My frustration of late is middle management over-assuming their understanding of technology based on their vaguely technical background from 10 years ago. They seem to just connect the dots without checking the facts, looking stupid in front of the customer. Leaves me in an awkward position when customer brings it up with me as the SME and I have to somehow explain they must have been a bit confused or something.

    They dont have any facebook/ipad glory, more of a twelve o'clock flasher.
     
  18. thetron

    thetron Member

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    Hmm what did we learn from this failure and how can we prevent it in future proactively?
     
  19. mr_death44

    mr_death44 Member

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    Buy a hamster, a hamster wheel, a spring, an electromagnet and a dynamo generator.

    When the power goes out, the electromagnet powers down relaxing the spring and lowing some food for the hamster. The hamster runs in the wheel, powers the dynamo and slow-charges the UPS.
    Repeat with multiple hamsters for RAIH (recommended RAIH 6 or Z3).

    Never have a UPS die again!
     
  20. FiShy

    FiShy Member

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    I would say tie the electromagnet to a donkey but donkeys are fucken useless
     

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