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Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. DavidRa

    DavidRa Member

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    Post current state issues, key DDs and bits you can't make work in 2012R2 for the new environment up in BE&C and let a few other heads stew on it. You might be surprised (you might not too, but hey, it's not going to kill you to try it out).
     
  2. cyclobs

    cyclobs Member

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    I've got a post up over in the programming section if anyone wants to have a look. It's my current hurtle to getting the system working but I'm unsure about other stuff (like user specific permissions and such).

    All which can be easily done on Linux boxes :(
     
  3. Great_Guru

    Great_Guru Member

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    No. Not for me.

    I clicked play offline then it advised "cannot connect to the activation server". Game would not load. This is with all network adapters disabled in an attempt to allow offline mode. It's a legit RS copy. Anyway moving on.

    For Autodesk Inventor - a single floating network license was quoted to us at around 14K and then there is a few thousand maintenance every year. For us it was cheaper to use the subscription model even with them being "named licenses" rather then floating. I think it is around 5.5k per annum per user. Monthly/Quarterly/Yearly (longer the term = cheaper).

    We've got 8 licenses currently (spread across different sites/business segments and no vault server) and if we look to put on a new engineer we can purchase that license per quarter and after 6 month probation he doesn't work out and things change in the business and we don't go through another hiring round then we don't have a spare license idle and capex gone to waste.

    And with Autodesk you don't get pushed the latest version, we can choose from 2015/2016 so you don't have to re-train straight away and can put some users on the new whilst leaving the others on the older version no problems.

    P.S. Subscription model was "Autodesk Product Suite Ultimate" which was Inventor, AutoCad (a few variants, mech/elec etc) and other components I'm not involved with.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2015
  4. millsy

    millsy Member

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    The concerns with cloud licenses not working in 'x' scenario kinda remind of the fresh hell that was/is hardware keys and horseshit like catia licensing :rolleyes:
     
  5. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I'm repeatedly reminded that solutions on Linux are generally a simple bit of config, versus solutions on Windows which are "pay money for a third party product".

    That doesn't make Windows bad, per se. It just means that world is defined by licenses, finance, bean counters, and purchase orders instead of technical know how. Some businesses consider that safe and predictable, which is also fine. However it is frustrating for someone like yourself and myself who are used to the flexibility that open source grants us.
     
  6. ausghostdog

    ausghostdog Member

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    *snip**snip*
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2015
  7. Iceman

    Iceman Member

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    Ha, "a bit of config". Lets be honest here, the quoted example is a guy doing something really out of left field.

    In short, he wants to do "auth for an FTP server on IIS8" and "eventually have this auth with a MySQL database"

    You want to blame the use of "third party products" for his gimcrackery? OK then.

    Tell me what products you'd use to achieve the same and tell me how they're not third party? ProFTPD? TinyRadius?

    TL;DR - One line installers of third party products don't make them native to the OS.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Rubbish. FTP integration with MySQL is very common, and can be done via nearly every single bundled/supported FTP service with any modern Linux distro, or even via PAM at a system level. This is bog standard 101 stuff in a Linux shop. I have done this so many times in my career, I've lost count.

    If it's included in the default/mainline repos of a distro that's under support, I consider that first party in Open Source land. i.e.: I use RHEL, I can get support for the product from RHEL, and it supports MySQL auth out of the box.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2015
  9. cyclobs

    cyclobs Member

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    Not only that but I had a full prototype running fine with this set up. Even had FTP data coming in & my admin section controlling the ftp access.

    Anyway even if I got IIS FTP extensibility running, IIS is very basic and I don't think I could get as much control as I could natively with my set up on Linux.
     
  10. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    IIS FTP seems basic. Its not. Its just as full fledged as most FTP servers out there - its just predominantly controlled from Windows AD or local user/groups + ntfs ACL's (in terms of user rights).
     
  11. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    What does one FTP server offer that another doesn't?

    If you are doing anything more than 'transferring files' with FTP, then I could make an argument that you are doing it wrong :). FTP should have died out ages ago

    IIS FTP lets you modify it's auth via Extensibility. There is no need for 3rd party licensing. And if you don't like IIS, you are free to install another FTP server that better meets your needs.

    Microsoft provide GINA and all required documentation if you have requirements that need the Windows Auth side of things modified.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Amen to that.

    The great irony of FTP is that it took forever to get people to use it ("FTP clients are too hard! Why do I need a username and password? Waaaah"), and now suddenly it's too hard to get people to stop using it because it's so ingrained.

    "This job would be great if it wasn't for the customers..."
     
  13. mr626

    mr626 Member

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    Part of working in this industry is that you need to be able to see the 'silver lining' I think.

    For example, this afternoon our Cisco phone system completely died (internal memory failed, going by console output).

    Silver lining: no-one can call me to complain :lol::thumbup:

    (thankfully we have up-to-date config backups and a current SmartNET agreement, so all should be well again before SOB tomorrow).

    Fun afternoon though :upset:
     
  14. blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    You only have 1 node in your cluster? Or do you use CME/BE?

    Even for small customers (not including CME) that's a horrible idea. I understand price conscious customers but I've always thought it was mental to have a single-node IP PBX.
     
  15. GreenBeret

    GreenBeret Member

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    I suggested body punches (I have a pair of boxing gloves in the office) from everyone else in the team. :leet:

    A fine workaround in the process of making us a more professional shop day by day. :thumbup: :Paranoid:
     
  16. mr626

    mr626 Member

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    You can't see, but I'm nodding in agreement.

    Maybe that's another silver lining...may help convince bean counters to let me add more redundancy to some core systems. I might just ask the Cisco tech to take his time....:lol:
     
  17. malbert

    malbert Member

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    <rant>

    This is the part of IT that really frustrates me and ties in with the discussions we've had around industry regulation. Everything is reactive instead of proactive. So instead of a system 'failing safely', s*** hits the fan and it falls to the worker bees to fix things as quickly and cheaply as possible. This perpetuates the cycle of failure; organisations never learn and underlying issues are never resolved, more duct tape is stuck on.

    My current organisation believes that it's appropriate to continue flogging 5+ year old assets running obsolete, unsupported software and using a design that doesn't work. This exposes the company to huge penalties if something goes wrong, it's ok because that will 'never happen' and we're saving some money.

    Meanwhile, power supplies are exploding, basic config changes are crashing devices and the client is demanding more for less in a tardis-type timeframe.

    </rant>

    *Sigh* might be time to move on again. Maybe I should become a barista?
     
  18. power

    power Member

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    shit mate, you've just described the management playbook.

    if it ain't stopping me from doing stuff this instant = no care.

    oh and buy me stuff now, for no budget.
     
  19. tobes

    tobes Member

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    +10000 terrible idea. Also, can never understand why people don't leverage more failover options on voice.

    "Our are clusters redundant"
    "But you're going out a single set of ISDN lines.....
    "And..."
     
  20. blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    I was talking to a friend of mine who works in an accounting company, multi-national, probably 250-300 employees. He knew I worked with Cisco UC and asked me about the phones on his desk. Turns out they were trying to fail over between nodes (and failing at it, so something was likely misconfigured as well) about 3-4 times a week, each time for 5-10 min during the business day. I asked how that's acceptable for his office and management just assumed all VoIP systems were equally shit and they just put up with it. The IT guys don't question it, they just plod along not actually trying to fix it and not being kicked up the arse about it.

    It's unreal how some companies manage to function... but hey, it keeps me employed in one capacity or another but it makes me rage at the same time.
     

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