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Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    That's still no excuse, you'd tackle it the same way you'd eat an elephant - one bite at a time.

    debug the fuck outta one function, build unit tests etc. then move on. rinse, repeat.
     
  2. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    Cost vs time means means the faster you code it and get it out the door the more money you make.. also the more bugs you write.

    There is a good reason why avoiding languages like that unless they are necessary for the goal (far less often than you think) is a good idea.

    Chances are if the goal requires something that high performance, you can afford good programmers and proper QA/audit and development cycles.
     
  3. millsy

    millsy Member

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    That principle does not work well when you have rapid development iterations like many modern sites have, as functionality change regularly.

    As much as I hate to say it, this can be where bug bounties fit in.
     
  4. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    He/She obviously knows that access has been removed, which is why you are being called.

    Access doesn't just "Drop off", and theres no way I would let IT be left holding the bag.

    "C is in control of that data, and we had a verified request from him on Friday to tighten up the access on that, Give him a bell if you need that access back, and get C to let us know, and we can fix you up lickety split"

    No innuendo or suggestion of wrongdoings, just.

    C is the boss of that data
    C asked us to modify permissions on it
    We modified permissions on it as requested
    You now don't have permissions
    Ask C to get them back
     
  5. EvilGenius

    EvilGenius Member

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    Went through this recently. Vendor increased their per user license fee for $businessapp by 150%. Management responded by removing access to said app from 90% of the company. Queue 300 calls about why can't I access $businessapp anymore?

    Fun times :)
     
  6. -Antiskeptic-

    -Antiskeptic- Member

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    WebCentral get another rant...

    Can't setup a simple NS delegation for a SubDomain, never get a call-back when escalating ticket in portal.

    Try to call main number, constantly engaged today. Farkin hopeless! :thumbdn::thumbdn:
     
  7. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    1) Legacy code base, easier/quicker to extend than start again

    2) For very large and complex applications, higher level languages don't always give the same performance. I know that's a highly subjective statement, but where I work we use nothing but huge maths number crunching software where we measure our work in CPU *years* per day, and there's a good reason it's all written in C/C++. A 10% slowdown in performance means we lose millions, and the faster the application, the more likely we are to use it (other considerations come in to play, but rendering speed frequently tops all other arguments and requirements for us).

    The extensible/API/addon layer - all of that is in Python across the vast majority of our vendors, because Python is nice and easy and free and hard to fuck up. But the core number crunching stuff all down below, that's generally always C/C++.
     
  8. Daemon

    Daemon Member

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    It's symptomatic of a company who doesn't have a core security focus and has generated a lot of technical debt.

    Generally writing tests and doing a proper code review takes 4 times longer than writing the actual code. The problem then becomes that it's "good enough", or so they think at the time.

    Going back 5-10 years later to review code is even worse, since you're re-learning it all again. Some of Apple's early code is atrocious. Re-writing it means high chances of something breaking / failing, which means a lot of problems.

    Have a look at the SSL issue: https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/20...s-ssl-bug-explained-plus-an-unofficial-patch/

    Unless you knew to look for it, it wouldn't even stand out. I also think there's a special place in hell for those who use GOTO statements....

    There's at least some progress towards balancing C performance with safety: https://www.rust-lang.org/

    Granted it's not a magic fix, but at least the performance is good (better than C in many cases) but you get inherit protection.

    There's also Go as well, although it's more web focussed.
     
  9. lavi

    lavi Member

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  10. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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  11. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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  12. FiShy

    FiShy Member

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    Is pretty hard when every crayon is purple.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I also miss the old SGI.
     
  14. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    purple packet eater.
     
  15. j3ll0

    j3ll0 Member

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  16. JumpingJack

    JumpingJack Member

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    Last edited: Jan 5, 2016
  17. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Windows? Bah, way too new. Go back to the old IRIX running on MIPS, and then we're talking.
     
  18. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    You're almost like a parody of yourself elvis :lol:
     
  19. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Pfft how about a proper 64bit processor and OS, Dec Aplha running Tru64.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I have a massive nerd boner for non-Wintel computing. Particularly old stuff.

    My 2016 goal is to get an Apple II set up via diskless booting, then running a serial dumb terminal to a Raspberry Pi, which will then be able to SSH in and admin our render cluster.

    Why? BECAUSE I CAN.

    We had a pretty big one of those at uni. I never got to do anything substantial with it, though. Only used it as a student for some C coding subjects.

    They had a bunch of Sun Ray thin clients hanging off it, which was pretty neat.

    I get all nerd-love over obscure systems as functional desktops though, hence my love of SGI IRIX workstations.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016

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