Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    It's a tough problem because when you go to profit units, you increase the risk in those individual units. Over time, the unit takes more risks because it increases return (that is their driver now). Eventually the people in the unit (or management) become uncomfortable with the risk and want to go back to some form of insurance (eg. salary/non-profit kpis). So they do that for a while. And as you know whenever you have insurance you have moral hazard (eg. lazy people) so over time management identifies the inefficiencies and calls to go back to profit units. And so the cycle continues.
     
  2. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    It's not really a tough problem. What it is is a system that is designed to reward a lack of innovation by incorrectly assuming that things that never change will continue to make the same profits forever. This has compounding effects of driving away the innovators, and leaving companies full of people who share the attitude that nothing should be changed anywhere ever, because it's "safe".

    Anyone in business will tell you that as a product gets older, the profits diminish. What people need to do is look at the proposed life of a product, and plot out the profitability over time. When that profitability diminishes, reward ideas that promote new innovations to improve/change it.

    Change, and to a point risk, is a necessary part of business. You simply cannot play it safe all the time and expect to remain profitable. That is not to say that chaos and a cowboy attitude is the answer. But controlled risk is a mandatory part of business.

    "Innovation is successful disobedience".
     
  3. lothloriel

    lothloriel Member

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    Thank human nature for that. We're conservative by nature until we realise it's alright to not be.
     
  4. cacophony

    cacophony Member

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    Was doing Unix Builds and designs for a rather large company in the UK. I got my RHCE / Red Hat Architect (they dont do it anymore), and my CCNP. Although not really a genius, i took those because the company paid for them. I kept on getting annoyed at the management, who constantly yelled at me for their own pitfalls, my job was to maintain and design new systems and that i did, and i always managed to mod away until it did it better than i expected.

    I was underpaid, nobody gave a shit, i was constantly getting on called because the juniors kept breaking things, despite me documented procedure, we always let the customer run their software on there without my approval / review just to make it look like we were a good company to them, and then itd break and theyd yell. Customer satisfaction is always pushed in the web industry yet the customer is always a beaner in fully managed environments.

    I quit last year doing serious IT work, its too time consuming to be honest. Im just working standard windows admin :thumbup: and automate everything in a very minimal environment, which is actually really painless, although i get paid half, i can still study and do the things on the side that i want to do. Professional IT just makes me want to cry nowadays.
     
  5. Cadbury

    Cadbury Member

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    Part of it is that IT companies have a culture of pigeon-holing their employees. Rather than a person having skills in all the areas you mention (networks, firewalls/security, unix, dba/sql, storage) and working on one or two clients, we are expected to specialise in a subset and work on numerous clients.

    For example, in a company i recently worked for, one "sysadmin" only worked on Tivoli Storage Manager. They had a background in unix but didnt use it. Unix admins at the same company just focused on unix sys admin. They didnt do anything with networking, database, or even storage provisioning. Similarly i'm a network/security person. I'm not expected or even allowed to do any unix or windows admin work, let alone sql. There's one guy on my team who just looks after Cisco firewalls - thats all. Anything outside of that is passed onto others. This Macdonalds "you want fries with that" kind of approach makes for people with a very limited skillset.
     
  6. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    There's a reason for not wanting jack-of-all-trades, especially in complicated environments.
     
  7. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    Efficiency.

    And the fact that the phrase is missing a part;

    jack of all trades, master of none.
     
  8. revhed

    revhed Member

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    An interesting phrase, although not entirely applicable to IT. IT is a connected environment. Therefore, to have a reasonable knowledge about other areas only helps to make you better in your own area of expertise. The number of times I've encountered a problem where "master tradesmen" all point at each other as the place to take a problem is mindboggling. It becomes a retarded circle. A good Jack of the trade can step through the problem - or at least stop these so-called masters from weasling out of investigating a problem. :)
     
  9. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    These people are not masters.

    They are double/triple degree holders who are everything that is wrong with the IT industry today.
     
  10. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    There's a middle ground between "ultra specialised master" and "jack of all trades".

    I don't expect everyone to know everything. But I find that some of the more fundamental concepts behind operating systems, networking and other building blocks of IT are completely lost on so many in this industry. It's utterly shocking at how little some folks really know, who really ought to know a lot more.

    Again, I'm not expecting crazy in-depth knowledge on every topic here. But when I see sysadmins who don't even get the basics of TCP/IP because "it's the network guy's problem", it makes me scared for the future of this industry.

    I spent all of last week trying to explain to my new co-workers what impact switching our /24 network to a /23 would have, and why the new set of IP addresses could see each other without needing a router. I would have hoped a team of sysadmins working for a well known company at the peak of their industry would have had that sort of knowledge already.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  11. chip

    chip Member

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    It'll be interesting to see how these sort of people cope with IPv6
     
  12. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    The short answer is they won't. There's no secret to why IPv6 adoption has been an abysmal failure to date.
     
  13. IACSecurity

    IACSecurity Member

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    You worked for Loftus then :)
     
  14. thetron

    thetron Member

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    This might be due to person work history and culture. Last work had more respect for department responsiblities

    My role was desktop support. So
    So if there was a security issue. Bounce to security!
    Problem with the server. Bounce to Server team/3rd party

    I didn't agree with this because slows the entire process down and people only learn from inside a glass box.

    Whats responsible could be managed services providers whom mentally train everyone to be robots
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  15. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    That's a support/fix type scenario. What I'm talking about is designing systems so that they interact with other departments and users better.

    I tire of seeing sysadmins design things that have zero consideration for security, networking, or other things within the business. Not only is it plainly obvious that the basic knowledge is lacking in the first place, it's also entirely frustrating when people don't get off their arse and take a short walk over to another department to ask a few questions.

    Every system I design and build is run past other departments. I need to know that it's going to fit in with the rest of the business, and that it's not going to break some existing process or system. And by talking to other departments, I get a feel for where they're headed.

    Going back to the big finance org I worked for way back, and using them as an example: if I were to roll out some new system, I'd chat to networks and security about what they were doing. A short, 5 minute chat reveals that they're pushing forward with a SAML implementation. So I make sure the system I'm rolling out handles that too. Now I've got a system in place that's future proof, and is substantially less work for all involved when the SAML implementation goes ahead and it needs to be integrated. And all it took was 5 minutes out of my life to talk to another human being, rather than sit in my cubicle with my head up my arse.

    On a much smaller scale, the place I work for now constantly sees new apps getting rolled out with zero consideration for the systems in place. To even get something rolled out that uses simple AD auth is a chore because people just don't even consider it (and then IT bitch about how many points of authentication we have to manage, while users bitch they have too many passwords to remember). Similarly we constantly get tools purchased that only work if systems are on the same broadcast, so our heavily VLANed setup tends to break them, and cause constant back-and-forth issues with the vendor. These scenarios are trivially avoided through a basic understanding of IT concepts, and a 5 minute chat with other departments. Yet it seems time and time again people just work in their little silos with their minute perspective and understanding of the world, and will simply not push themselves to get off their arse and ask a few questions, let alone learn some new skills.
     
  16. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    IMO the main culprit for this is Business drivers, not IT.

    e.g iPhones when in 5 minutes you could rip everything of value off an encrypted, locked 3GS. BUT I GOTTA HAVE IT, I DON'T CARE THAT I'M A CEO OF A MULTI-BILLION DOLLAR COMPANY WITH LOADS OF MARKET SENSITIVE SECRETS ON MY EMAIL ETC, JUST STFU AND MAKE IT WORK.
     
  17. OP
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    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I agree that when it comes to edge devices, business drivers are at fault. When it comes to core infrastructure, business drivers are completely ignorant to these things, and it ends up being some retarded middle management goon who makes bad decisions, and underqualified senior technical staff who don't advise them accordingly.
     
  18. millsy

    millsy Member

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    Or staff that are told to make it work or else...
     
  19. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    The project must be delivered on this date!

    Any issues after that can be sorted out by BAU.

    This way all projects are successful.
     
  20. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    Look at this Proof of Concept! QUICK FORCE IT TO PRODUCTION.
     

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