Consolidated Business & Enterprise Computing Rant Thread

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by elvis, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. mooboyj

    mooboyj Member

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    The race to the bottom in many ways has killed IT. I for a very short time was passionate about it and loved solving problems. I also enjoyed showing others how things worked and why they worked that way.

    Now all I see are a stream of useless kents who have ZERO knowledge of even the most basic concepts.

    I have the lost the .5 guy I work with whilst moving my own area over to SCCM2012 and almost 100% W7. I am also setting up small Linux lab and portable PCs with Puppet to manage them. I also need to setup two Dell mini-hpcs with a mix of Centos and 2008R2. They also want job queuing and I'm now going to have to figure out Torque and maybe Maui.

    I no longer enjoy IT and think it is a combination of unrealistic expectations, cost cutting, no training, little/ no overtime (it is just expected to work) and Joe Average thinking they are experts because they can install a fu#king app:mad: Think about it, 99.99% of businesses lose most of their functionality when computing systems are down, yet it is almost always managed by fu#king accountants and is always the first thing that is cut. Who here even has the majority of their core infrastructure on warranty?

    Who here has honestly felt outsourcing was an improvement in anything? I have trained foreign staff in a foreign country for this role, and while it eventually worked out okay, it was a long tiring process that only worked because we didn't want our customers to suffer. YES, I ACTUALLY GAVE A FU#K and wanted things to be as good as the support provided from Australi.

    I have a career out, starting next year I will be learning another language and hope to use that with my unused Economics Degree to move into something else.

    End bitter rant about "professional IT" and the many many many useless kents (management I am looking at you in particular) that work in it:tired:
     
  2. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    Ahh ITIL and SLA's, I hate you.

    I guess I am lucky that my current work place tries to keep certain infrastructure in warranty. Mind you work is working with M$ to sort out a Win 2008 R2 memory issue, millions of folders of small files eating up RAM due to indexing.
     
  3. bcann

    bcann Member

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    I hated it and i refused to play that game, small 5 second changes got done there and then, not waiting till the job was about to expire and then done. My job queue was never particularly huge, but thats because i did my work when it came in and planned it in if it was a project. I've seen service folk spend more time replying to an email saying why they couldn't make the change then the time it would've taken to just do it.

    ITIL is a complete wank, and SLA's are great for lazy people. i've seen plenty of large service providers and even DC's find ways to avoid paying for SLA breaches.
     
  4. Raraku

    Raraku Member

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    I'm actively laughing at everybody who has slammed ITIL / another framework.

    You probably don't work in a workplace big enough to support these - please remember they are FRAMEWORKS and not designed to be a one fit across the board.

    Change management/release management is critical to let stakeholders know what is going on - if you have a bunch of cowboys running your enterprise, shit will hit the fan real quick.
     
  5. bcann

    bcann Member

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    Does 100,000 users qualify as large. When i shit on ITIL i'm talking a grunts on the ground level, IE front line Tech support staff, not much higher up in the chain. Even still ITIL is a way for manager to find words that sound not as bad as what has really happened.

    I have zero problem with change management, but lets face it, at a helpdesk level change management exists because staff are underemployed and underskilled and little more then seat warmers and script reading monkeys, you do find the occasional gem, but the SLA limits are there to allow the incompetent time to breath and speak with 50 people to work out how to add someone to a group when in the real world they've never seen a computer before.

    I'm not talking about reinventing the wheel, but simple problems with trivial solutions that take weeks to do because there is no sense of urgency, when your in a call centre 3000KM away from the real world clients and don't understand nor care that your 3 click operation is holding up the work of real people, because the SLA isn't close to expiring and you can sit on it for a bit, and then to just piss me off even more, palm the job off to me 5 minutes before it expires so i cop the breach.
     
  6. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    ITIL as Raraku rightly points out is a framework. If it's not working in your environment, that's a failure of implementation and enforcement. It's not the fault of ITIL.

    Secondly, SLAs are not for helpdesks. Neither is change management. Help desks are 1st level support monkeys. SLAs are contractual matters to enable companies to communicate and support critical busines; this needs fixing within this time period or this is the financial penalty that applies. It enables the service provider to understand the level of resources that need to be on hand/ assigned. It gives certainty to the business that given an outage of critical severity, they will be able to conduct business as usual within a set time. This is doubly important if they are selling services to other clients.

    Change management is a process to ensure imbeciles and cowboys don't go fucking things they don't understand. That they don't arbitrarily decide to implement a change that takes them five seconds but screws everyone else around.

    If these aren't working in your environment, it's the fault of the people, not the processes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2012
  7. Raraku

    Raraku Member

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    What. Once again, it's a Framework designed to help your business. I'm going out on a limb here and say you work in a call center/helpdesk monkey (glorified receptionist) and have no idea about the real change management / release management process of things.

    SLA's are there so jobs get done in an appropriate timeframe and ensure that people don't sit on things for ages - they have escalation procedures for a reason. Without SLA's I could be waiting days or weeks for 5-10 minute jobs. Change management BEGINS at a helpdesk level - you rely on change management and release management for all tasks - it starts at the first level and continues up. Have you even attended ITIL or any other framework training?

    Once again, problem with your implementation of the process - if somebody is sitting on a job for X period and then re-assigns your tracking software should help illustrate this and show the raw statistics. I don't think you understand ITIL or any other Framework.
     
  8. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    my bro works for a company several times bigger in senior problem management. its a frickin science dood. just because you can get away without ITIL or other equivalent, doesn't mean you should. the long tail of probabilities will mean one day it will come crashing down. youre just not there yet.
     
  9. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Businesses are starting to use SLA's as KPI's fr their internal staff as well these days.

    Also most SLA's do effect the 1st level help desk jockeys, as most SLA's have a component that states the request must be acknowledged within a specified period of time, not resolved or responded to but acknowledged so the customer know that you are aware of the issue.
     
  10. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    Yes SLAs affect '1st level help desk jockeys', but they aren't constructed for them. The process merely has to start somewhere.
     
  11. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    I beg to differ, alot of the SLA's I've worked with a majority of the tasks where completed by 1st and 2nd level helpdesk as they majority of calls where for password resets or stuck print jobs in queues. And these tasks usually had a very short time allowance.
     
  12. bcann

    bcann Member

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    Same here, a lot of tasks are completed normally by the L2 onsite folk (like i used to be) rather then the L1 helpdesk monkeys. SLA's applied but were not divided into a quicker response (like a password reset) for L1 type stuff. but again it did depend on which monkey you got as some would do it then and there others wouldn't.
     
  13. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    ITIL and other frameworks are not the problem but the business trying to implement it when it doesnt suit the business model just because it is the current buzz word in IT at the moment. Former workplaces have used it well and poorly, worst was a 600 employee company with 5 IT staff including the IT manager. Glad I left that sinking ship. The use of SLA for KPI is a worry that I now face.
     
  14. thetron

    thetron Member

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    Last time I checked EDS/HP still have a relationship with BoQ. Supplying onsite support and servers
     
  15. Riddick187

    Riddick187 Member

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    It's not that people should stop striving to be above average, but I believe your opinion of what propels one above this "average" line is somewhat off.
    Whilst it's always nice to know more and be jack of all trades, being above average is doing what is needed and required for any one role better than your peers. With that said knowing 12 programming/scripting languages and having had experience/understanding a range of technologies that could well be unrelated to the IT infrastructure one works with or even obsolete in general is certainly not that.
     
  16. millsy

    millsy Member

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    I think part of the issue is you're using peers as a comparison point. Personally I try to define it as independently of others as possible.
     
  17. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    That is what I always used to say, and the bastards said that proves I'm cynical!
     
  18. Diode

    Diode Member

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    I'm tired of implementing some other departments 'solution'. :tired:
    I'm tired of then copping shit from said department when I don't deliver their solution to their schedule because their solution is shit.:tired:
    I'm tired of my technical experience not being acknowledged and being used to help develop a good solution. :tired:
    I'm tired of my manager who does nothing other than say "why wasn't this done?" or "when will it be done" and yet will never understand technically why it wasn't done or why something is delayed. They only care that my delivery affects their performance review. :tired:
    I'm tired of career climbers that only care about their position in the company and are next to useless in their position that their in.:tired:

    :tired:
     
  19. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    The correct answer to these questions is "because you failed to plan correctly, and assumed the time resources required instead of asking someone qualified".

    Alternatively, you can just say "the 6 Ps".

    Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.
     
  20. Diode

    Diode Member

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    A lot has to do with poor management of resources. We have a fair bit, but the top level of the business has decided to divide us up. Unfortunately I'm the only sys admin in my division and when I need to get resources from another team such as a DBA or another sys admin I don't get their time because that will take time away from what their doing and their managers performance. A lot of the time that means I have to look after myself and be my own Windows/Linux sysadmin and DBA all in one. In one way that's nice as I get my hands on different tech, but it can also slow things down too as I'm not natively a Linux admin or DBA. So it can be frustrating when someone wants something now but you can't get other resources to help.
     

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