Consolidated Climate Change/CO2/Global Warming Thread

Discussion in 'Science' started by hlokk, Feb 12, 2007.

  1. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    A one man effort in cold desert.
    2 key successful methods are:
    1. 'swale on contour' - to keep water in the root zone of new plantings by capturing it in the 'swales'
    2. plantings are close together to provide mutual shading and soil moisture retention.


    once established, water is trapped in the soak. and water percolates through to depth.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2019
  2. RnR

    RnR Member

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    Sounds like he has near permanent water availability. Initially I thought the swales did all the hard work in capturing just local available precipitation, but I think its a little more organised than that.
     
  3. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    it uses a lot less water. same method used in projects in Africa (the farmers using intensive irrigation can't do it without the intensive water supply) The point is it is very efficient use of limited water supply. Once you get larger forested areas the evapo. thing helps. can't expect miracles that defy the laws of physics.

    the swales when mulched and shaded properly do retain the moisture better allowing it to sink in deeper. grasses ground covers and a tree canopy.

    otherwise you face the expensive prospect of energy intensive desal. and long range canals or piping...to water the crap out of dead soils with energy intensive artificial fertilisers- maybe the runoff from that can achieve something useful...like flow into natural waterways :lol:

    anyway. he isnt growing crops. there are farming methods using same swale on contour principle.

    'their way' of cropping requires more energy and more water (and a benign climate) ...good luck to them.
    ---
    https://www.refinitiv.com/perspectives/market-insights/whats-the-global-crop-outlook-for-2018/

    still rockin their monocrops. Europe had a couple of 'bad' seasons.
    ----

    Forestry in Iceland.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2019
  4. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Scared of bringing a child into this changing world? You're not the only one.




    Reconsidering having kids because of climate change? You’re not alone


    https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/prog...aving-kids-because-of-climate-change/10795320

     
  5. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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  6. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    Clearly not hot enough - it still exists.
     
  7. Perko

    Perko Member

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    Does it? I forgot about it there for a while.
     
  8. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    People from there keep posting.
     
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  9. RnR

    RnR Member

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    They are all underground.
     
  10. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    A good visual explanation of the movement of earth around the sun, and the axial tilt period (the ice age connection)

    11,800 A.D. is the next minimal tilt...so the 'Ice Age will save us from global warming' is a bit far-fetched.
    ----
    2 new coal fired thermal plants being proposed in NSW.
    - btw: check out youtube for "Idiots at Work" it can be quite amusing :rolleyes:
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03...-hunter-valley-reignite-climate-wars/10877470
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  11. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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  12. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    Seems an interesting watch;

    -
     
  13. Phido

    Phido Member

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    For those who TLDR

    • Wake up and freak out
    • Transformative adaption
    • Deep adaptation due to failure to transform (seed future society)
    • Feel anger, feel grief
    • Rebel - Mass non-violent action - governments are not legitimate if they are destroying non human and human life
    • We need to talk
    • Stop. Pause.

    Here is the problem, academics say this stuff and don't really sell the current situation. Its done in a very academic way.
    I think something is changing in Australia there is a better and wider understanding. Drought, murry darling, barrier reef, floods, fire are all real symptoms that get people to notice.

    A protest of 30,000 isn't enough.
     
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  14. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    Perhaps change your concept of what affluence means. There are many more problems caused by human actions that are actually consuming the energy in the first place, regardless of its source.

    Although, the UK successfully legislated coal into oblivion. they also dont have the abundant coal resources that they used to, which probably made it an easier decision.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019 at 8:34 AM
  15. Phido

    Phido Member

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    I don't get this?
    Are you saying I, personally, should live in a cave? Or you should live in a cave? Or we all should live in a cave? Or just change to energy efficient light bulbs? Or quit our well paid jobs and start basket weaving? Or instead of buying a 911 turbo I should buy just a regular 911, or maybe a cayman or just change my car lease from 12 months to 24 months? Or should we all just kill ourselves? What affluence do you think I have?

    My concept for affluence is to give my children a healthy start to live and an education reflecting my values and morals. I lived off grid for 10 years, generating my own power, in a shed, compositing my our faeces, collecting and drinking my own water. I built probably the lowest energy to build structure I could. I don't see anyone else at the level of existence I went to, for 10 years. I learnt it is very hard to live that way. 90% couldn't live that way, even if their life depended on it, and even in a functioning society at the current climate. It is much harder than people think, and people always think that they personally "are doing a lot". No one see themselves as part of the problem.

    Much of my energy consumption is driven by my employment. I have to transport myself to work, with thousands of others, using huge amounts of energy. However, my job, teaching, teaching engineering, I justify by saying maybe I can change the minds of thousands of young people. Sure I can stay on the farm and build a bunker, increase my crops and fruit trees, increase my food and energy storage. Not use any fossil fuels.

    But that doesn't help the collective. As an individual it doesn't fix the planet.

    Also people don't want to live in bunkers, or go back to living in caves.

    What people aren't aware of is the huge amount of damage they are doing that could easily be reduced. They also don't understand how big the climate change issue is. If you put it as which year would you like your first famine or which year would you like the last tree to die in your suburb it would probably have a bit more resonance.
     
  16. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    ahh yes the caveman argument. I'm suggesting quality of life can be achieved by many means. And that our environment is a large part of that 'quality'.

    what you've said about your 10 year lifestyle is an admirable endeavour. kudos to you. and a lot of hard work!

    the jobs that are 'well paid' that all depends on what endeavours the capital is focussed on obviously. of course i'm interested in a 'green' economy for best effect.
    ----
    but it helped your little corner of it :)
    ------

    ...the 'collective' enmasse solutions to high density populations. will always be problematic because of the concentration of materiel (and energy) to support it. natural systems get destroyed to service these termite mound blob urban dead environments....and this happens globally.

    to me it is absolutely the question of population density and per capita consumption of all things. the clean energy aspect is the part relevant to the thread.

    Pairing high density pop. with low density energy is problematic and counterintuitive.
    And yeah i'll always advocate less versus more.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2019 at 9:54 AM
  17. neRok

    neRok Member

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    Like your wife running the AC at 19° 24/7?
     
  18. Phido

    Phido Member

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    Which is powered by our solar panels. She claims she can do what ever she wants because of our previous sacrifices. We made lots of sacrifices and compromises. More than most make in a lifetime.
    And I recently convinced her to go to 20 degrees and use the timer. So big win, I am currently a net exporter.

    I like to call it the lesser Porsche philosophy.. If instead of buying a 911 turbo and I buy a Cayman, am I now saving the planet?there is a difference between making small choices that have small impacts, and system changing ones. Most of what people do, recycling, driving a diesel etc does nothing good for the environment. Certainly nothing good for emissions.

    In one sense we failed. We didn't like living that life style, forever. It wasn't convenient. And at some point, when it was 48 degrees, and we had 3 year old and a new born, and we were out of drinking water, out of formula, and the batteries were dead, the genny wouldn't start and 100% humidity, and pressures from family and work, we decided to transition to a eco-suburban lifestyle from our eco-rural lifestyle. However, I wouldn't say we are totally ignorant in our new surroundings.

    Did we? on a local level, we probably had a negative effect on wildlife, on birds, on the soil, etc. Sure we didn't use any grid services, but there is still a significant impact. We burnt wood for heating, more fuel for driving, did we really come out a head?

    However, I am one of the lucky few that has a farm and a house in Sydney and did it ourselves. We hope to keep the farm as a weekender, particularly in winter, when it is totally lovely to be out there doing things.

    Which is the point, there isn't enough value in being particularly green.
     
  19. adamsleath

    adamsleath Member

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    i want to be comfortable. so i need a comfy environment. im hardly going to sit on a rock in the bush extolling the virtues of a natural environment while living like a pre-industrial hunter gatherer. ...or in my case perishing due to heat stroke and malnutrition.

    but still. for all the artificial systems put into place for our subsistence, it is often at the expense of displacing natural environments and ecologies. somehow my aim is to live as much as is possible amongst a natural environment. and as for the burbs, nature is in the gardens, parks, waterway easements, state forests, etc. and people's back yards vegetation.

    in terms of value. owning land sufficient to create the environment you desire is about as basic as it gets.

    Land area for all land based life is of unquestioned 'value' to me. So what remains is how 'best' to allocate its use.

    i dont know what sort of creature actually enjoys living in a dead environment. i only know that i am not one of them.

    i grew up with no a/c. it isnt a necessity. it is a luxury.
    the amenity of a shady tree and a light breeze are of value to me.
    having water for a cool shower - maybe that is luxury...in a hot dry location.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2019 at 2:55 PM
  20. clonex

    clonex Member

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    People more wasteful with solar, seems like the biggest benefit is running the AC all year round :D
     

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