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Consolidated Soldering and Rework thread

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by trackhappy, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. axx

    axx Member

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    Thanks for the input, I had a quick look, and I think I would like a mains power workstation; however, I will watch some reviews later on:thumbup:
     
  2. holdennutta

    holdennutta Member

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    Yeah. I'm going to run mine off a main laptop adapter. No interest in using mine off lipos lol. Just a nice feature than you can.
     
  3. axx

    axx Member

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    Had a look at the ts100, there are some good youtube reviews, however, still would like a mains workstation. I'm just not sure on a used genuine hakko 936, but I think that would give me a good quality iron at a cheap price, parts are plentiful?????
     
  4. Matthew kane

    Matthew kane Member

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    The 936D is part of old Hakko lineup (90's) I also wouldnt bother with used stations, buy new. The current in production fx888d is superior and can be had for $160-180 online from a authorised Hakko distributor.
     
  5. axx

    axx Member

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    Thanks, I agree with you, however, I was trying to keep costs around the $100 mark, I know, improbable, but that is/was my budget approximately.
     
  6. Matthew kane

    Matthew kane Member

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    If you're trying to keep your budget below $100 mark, I'd rather a new Atten 938D over a used Hakko 936D.
     
  7. axx

    axx Member

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    Ok, great, I presume that is better than the hakko clone from hobbyking?
     
  8. Matthew kane

    Matthew kane Member

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    The Atten is an improved clone off the old Hakko 936D with a digital display for temperature + adjustments and a digital microcontroller for temperature/overload and circuit protection.

    There are other good Atten models that can be had for $50-100 range off ebay etc. They will last you long enough till you feel the need for a serious soldering workstation and you have a wider purchasing budget.
     
  9. axx

    axx Member

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    Well, I saved a bit more and found a Weller wes51 for $150 delivered. It really is night and day difference compared to the wall plug solderers. Thanks for all the help and info.[emoji106]
     
  10. dufflover

    dufflover Member

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    Fine soldering iron tip for cheapie Jaycar iron

    I have the basic 25W Jaycar soldering iron
    https://www.jaycar.com.au/25-watt-240v-soldering-iron/p/TS1465
    and for my n00b projects it can do the job fine in the end, and any issues I'm sure are due to the operator :p

    One thing I'd like to improve on it though is to get a finer tip as I've been stepping up to using SMD components (and these days it seems certain parts that fit the bill only come in some sort of SMD form). Places like AliEx have plenty of spare tips, but I can't find any specs to know which ones are compatible.

    Any tips (no pun intended) on picking one?

    I'm open to buying a new/better iron if it comes with one too but I did have a bad experience with the Aldi one that I returned it; just never heated consistently or anything.
     
  11. mtma

    mtma Member

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    I have used that iron in a pinch but it's just urgh.

    I would recommend buying yourself a better iron a temp controlled type at least if you're getting a bit more serious about small component work.
     
  12. Ch4iS

    Ch4iS Member

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    If it's anything like mine it'll probably burn up a fine tip :p

    Good thing is they do last, I've had the same iron since ~2009.
     
  13. @rt

    @rt Member

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  14. dufflover

    dufflover Member

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    Well I wouldn't know honestly if that would be the case. I thought 25W was on the crap end of the scale (or is that only really relate to the rate it hears up?) so a thin tip wouldn't burn up out anything, just take longer to heat up the surface being soldered.

    Like I said I haven't had issues temp wise with frying components yet, just a finer tip would be handy no and again.
     
  15. breno

    breno Member

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    Hey guys,
    I want to get into learning how to solder, mainly to get into console repairs when necessary. I've read tutorials that to permanently fix Xbox 360 RROD is to resolder GPU back to motherboard though I assume the techniques used would require a certain amount of soldering experience before being able to do. (if anyone knows that this is otherwise correct, I don't mind being corrected)

    I'd also like to learn to just have it as a skill and do general repairs.

    So that being said, can anyone recommend what gear an absolute beginner like myself would need to start out with and what kind of things can I do and/or practice on?
     
  16. Matthew kane

    Matthew kane Member

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    Get a decent iron and start practicing through hole component soldering on perf/prototype pcb’s. Learn and practice using the right temperature on the iron tip with the right solder type and the right amount of solder while keeping a steady hand.

    Then step up your game to doing SMT soldering, keep practicing then you might be able to do BGA reballs with or without reball stencils. You need to learn and understand the equipment before you start doing any BGA reball/rework especially where large amounts of heat, flux and solder paste is involved (temperature control otherwise you damage the board). Practice on dead boards first before you start doing any client work. Though from the sounds of it you don’t possess the knowledge on basic EE concepts and fundamentals, a’la schematic/circuit diagram reading, ohms laws etc, so you may need to synthesize the theory before attempting any real repairs.

    Electronic repairs of this level is far more than simply replacing parts. Building things, putting parts together according to a schematic, design, instructions with a BOM is one thing and alot simpler. Troubleshooting and repairs involves an understanding with what you’re working with especially where complex circuits such as a console mainboard is involved also while maintaining safety with power handling.

    To answer the next part of your post, consoles that face the dreaded problem of GPU failing is either due to overheating (poor thermal contact or heat dissipation) which can lead to thermal runaway on parts or bad bga contact. A reflow to the bga underneath the GPU chip can fix the problem but it is temporary (most common home fixes for reflowing is baking the stripped mainboard or hairdryer/heat gun method). A proper fix would be to reball it from scratch using a fresh bga rework. Remove the gpu, clean the bga on the chip and mainboard, apply your paste etc and reflow the chip onto the mainboard.

    Good luck
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
    breno likes this.
  17. breno

    breno Member

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    That's a great post, thanks alot!
    In regards to the GPU failures, I did read online exactly how you described it, to completely remove GPU, clean and rework which would obviously take a lot of practice prior before attempting but gotta start somewhere! I wouldn't be doing client work per say but purchasing dead systems and (hopefully) fixing them...That's my end goal I think for now.
     
  18. dufflover

    dufflover Member

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    Ended up buying a Yihua 936B off eBay AUS (ordered a 936C from a diff *cough* local seller but that never came, at least getting a refund was easy).

    I got given a small tube of spare lead-free solder but I'm tempted to just relegate it to forever emergency solder as I've read nothing particularly good about it and just on the weekend before getting this solder station tried to repair a broken cable and add a small ceramic decoupling cap in the process with my basic-but-usable Jaycar/Digitech iron. Well ... "useable" until I had to resort to the lead-free stuff!

    I expect the cheapi Yihua to still be much more potent to handle it, but just reading about the brittle joints, reduced tip life, etc. ... bleh. Think I'll pick up a reel of old school 60/40 solder from Jaycar for $15 which'll prob last the rest of my days of odd circuit jobs.
     
  19. anark1

    anark1 Member

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  20. gadgetman88

    gadgetman88 New Member

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