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Consolidated Soldering and Rework thread

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by trackhappy, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. Mjollnir

    Mjollnir Member

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    pbjabba and Agg like this.
  2. Recharge

    Recharge Member

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    it's magic I swear!
     
  3. mtma

    mtma Member

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    Lol I was just being shown this.

    It came up that even with normal soldering onto things that aren't usually going to take solder like Aluminium, by rubbing the hot iron tip into the surface it breaks up inter-layers allowing your solder to bond to the base. So I guess that's where the ultrasonic part really comes from.
     
  4. Mjollnir

    Mjollnir Member

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    Quality of the joints look terrible though, wouldnt trust it to last long term.
     
  5. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    's funny - with his home-rolled solder recipe he says pretty well the same thing in the video...
     
  6. SpaceFrog

    SpaceFrog Member

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    I have the same soldering iron. broke it out to solder my first keyboard. [​IMG]

    Came into this thread looking for advice on desoldering tools. I bought a cheap solder sucker from Jaycar the other day, and it's next to useless.

    I need something to desolder and solder the smd 3030 RGB LEDs and also a 4 pin connector. I had desoldered the 4 pin connector for one of the OLED displays and it took an hour, and then the display still wouldn't turn on. Probably got too much heat or I bent something. The solder sucker wouldn't remove enough solder, and it was a tight fit to begin with. I just applied heat to two or three pins at a time and wiggled it out.

    I used 300 degrees for the LEDs, Only one of them would turn. It seems people recommend 220 to 270. My 60/40 solder kinda works at 270, but nothing lower. Is there anything better? the keyboard designer shows his technique for soldering to the rear of the LEDs, but not for the underglow LEDs.

    also going to get a new tip or two, have a pointed tip, i hear flat ones are better all round, and concave ones can help with smd reflow work.
     
  7. _zak

    _zak Member

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    Do you have flux and solder braid/wick? I find both absolutely essential for SMD work. The type of flux is a matter of preference, although I prefer gel flux as it can hold components in place while you're working.

    When it comes to removing pin headers, they can be a real pain. If destroying the header (and then replacing it) is an option, the technique in this video can be handy.

    SMD LEDs are generally much more sensitive to heat than other components. My technique is to flow solder onto one pad, then heat it to melting, and push the LED into position with tweezers. It'll 'stick' to the molten solder by surface tension, and then you can quickly (2-3 s) position it make sure it's straight. After that, put flux on all the pads (including the one you started with) and work your way around each of the remaining pads before reflowing the first one.
     
  8. SpaceFrog

    SpaceFrog Member

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    Bought flux for this project. Don't have braid. Haven't had much success with it in the past. This is the first time using flux and I'm liking it. Does the braid work better with flux?
     
  9. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    Adding flux never hurts. Braid is usually impregnated with some flux or rosin. When using braid, it can help to 'wet' the braid with some solder first. It seems counter intuitive to add solder when you're trying to remove it, but it helps the 'wetting' process, to get the solder flowing.
     
  10. Andrew_Wong

    Andrew_Wong Member

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    Flux is the magic goo.. everything flows so much better.. and rework is so much easier..
     
  11. Mjollnir

    Mjollnir Member

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    MG Chemical 835 and Amtech tacky flux are must haves.
     
  12. whatdoesthisdo

    whatdoesthisdo Member

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    I have been doing some led setups around the house and it finally came time to solder. I have never really done it before but I couldn't put it off any longer. I grabbed an old soldering iron in the tool box and attempted to solder some wire to the end of the leds. The iron was too big for intricate work and I didn't even know what flux was. What a shit fight!

    After watching a few YT vids I thought, like any good tradesman, its must be the tools fault. So I headed down to jaycar to grab a new cheapy but once I got there I was taken by a ~$89 Li-Ion iron and after some debate I grabbed it as well as some flux (DUH!).

    Holy shit! It turned me into an absolute pro, beautiful solders every time without any effort. Highly recommended for beginners. :thumbup:
     
  13. unifern

    unifern Member

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    gday after recommendations on soldering/desolding/rework station setup?
    got a bunch of 80s/90s pcs that need fixing (commodores,amigas,sinclairs,5150,486,p1/2s etc) some 90s arcade machine boards, just hoarded a bunch of non working gear over lockdowns before getting the hardware needed to repair it lol.
    also eager to get into modular synthesizer diy and hopefully someday learn enough to fix up/mod CRTs without frying myself.

    after reading here/youtubing I'm stuck trying to choose between:
    hakko 888d or ts100 though most ts kits are bundled with seemingly craptastic psus?
    Weller WE1010 also looks good, as does the Yescom 853D with its 0-15v dc psu seems like a handy feature
    any essential/recommended extras? silicone mat, fume extractor? since ital be in a bedroom as the garage is chock full thanks to aforementioned non functional aracdes lol
     
  14. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    Fume extractor with activated charcoal filter is a definite must-buy if you're working on a large amount of gear in an enclosed space without specialised ventilation arrangements.
    Would also highly recommend a dedicated work surface e.g. cutting mat to catch any drips of solder or rework flux etc.
    Can't go wrong with Hakko/Weller really, or Yihua via the usual suspects is about 75% as good for 50% of the price.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2021
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  15. unifern

    unifern Member

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    thanks mate, any suggestions for desoldering gear/solder sucker? or could i get away with just the iron for now?
     
  16. Andrew_Wong

    Andrew_Wong Member

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    For fume extraction, if you can .. it's easier to duct the air outside. I can't imagine soldering for even 2 minutes
    without it, let alone the 3-4 hour stints I end up doing from time to time.

    I use a 6" duct and a 240v extractor fan.. no problem sucking all fumes away from my work bench.

    With de-soldering.. I tried the handheld suckers.. and someone gave me some really good advice and I got a Hakko 474 unit.. it's really effective and easy to clean/use - even with lead free solder.. Save up for it.

    I still use wick for small re-work, so I'd suggest you start with that unless you're doing lots of thru-hole stuff then the Hakko is worth it.

    Hot air is really useful.. I use it far more than I initially thought.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2021
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  17. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    As per Andrew_Wong , you could probably kick off with just the iron and a supply of solder wick + handheld solder sucker....
    But if you've got a fair amount of stuff to work through then you might consider a hot air rework station and dedicated vacuum wand for solder removal.
    All depending on your budget and how much stuff you have to get through. :)
     
    unifern likes this.
  18. unifern

    unifern Member

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    Andrew_Wong
    from a quick search seems most are well over a grand, apologies for not mentioning a budget beforehand but was aiming at maxing out around $600 for a complete setup, Maybe for now ill stick with a fan and an open window (which is gonna suck with the current weather lol) then diy something up once I've moved on from quick simple kits/repairs to the larger multi hours projects

    looks like most synth projects and aftermarket retro pcb related diagrams/kits have lots of thru-hole stuff so ill deffo save up for a 474

    BlueRaven
    definitely have no shortage of gear to work through haha but yeah its making more sense now to start simple and work up towards proper fume extractors and rework stations when my bank acc can withstand it.

    on a semi related note i can't avoid the hakko colour scheme reminding me of the hotwheels pc :lol:
     
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  19. brokenback

    brokenback Member

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    Get the Hakko...then a good antistatic mat and wrist straps etc (ensure its earthed)....then other things.
     
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  20. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    For fume extraction, even something like this is better than nothing, and the charcoal filter means you don't have to leave a bloody window open in the middle of winter!
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/284384187329?hash=item42369e53c1:g:EEcAAOSwowZg~OQ6&frcectupt=true
    (You can definitely get these cheaper than AU$60 by shopping around, this is just the first result I found).

    The Yihua stuff is not up to quality of Weller/Hakko (even though you've got to spend a fair bit of money on those or other "proper" brands to get something really nice and long-term reliable in a heavy-use application).
    But it would be a pretty cheap way to get into reworking a lot of gear, and personal experiences with it in a commercial repair/manufacturing setting was fine (although I'd have preferred something a bit more flash! :D ).
    A basic station will run you about $100pp (probably less if you shop around a bit): https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/224329769606?hash=item343b18a286:g:NbcAAOSwKdVfWHuX
    So you could get going with pretty much everything you need for around $150 + consumables.
    Pretty sure they also make a station with hot air and vac in the same unit, for a considerably higher cost of course.
    Maybe worth considering until you can afford more professional gear?
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2021

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