Consolidated Soldering and Rework thread

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by trackhappy, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. OmmO

    OmmO (Banned or Deleted)

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    I've been using AOYUE 2702A+ for around 5 years now, and have a few other stations over $100, and have similarly used cheap irons too.

    In all honesty, it's worth the investment in getting a decent soldering station if you solder a lot. they'll last you for a LONG time, and if you buy a common one, tips should be no issue at all.



     
  2. GTR27

    GTR27 Member

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    Yes, I've done a fair bit of soldering with it now, all the little jobs fixing stuff that I put off. It's so much easier with a proper solder iron/station. It's a joy to use!
     
  3. zeropluszero

    zeropluszero Member

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    Can anyone recommend a cheap, high powered (80w+) iron that I can easily replace tips on?
    I have a relatively complex soldering job I'd like to perform - http://kingpincooling.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2290

    I currently use two Jaycar models -
    http://www.jaycar.com.au/Tools-&-So...Electric/80-Watt-240V-Soldering-Iron/p/TS1485 and a http://www.jaycar.com.au/Tools-&-So...erature-Controlled-Soldering-Station/p/TS1620

    If I use this guide, the tip on the 80w model is closest to the top right
    [​IMG]

    I believe for removing the chokes, I'm best off with something with a chisel type tip.
    Not looking to spend a lot on this, I'm not likely to be doing a lot of this sort of work, but if there's something that's a good strong iron with easily replaced tips, i'm all ears.
     
  4. terrabyte

    terrabyte Member

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    I use a basic Hakko temperature controlled soldering iron now. It came in around $150 so not exactly budget, but not super expensive either.

    It absolutely flogged my DSE and jaycar soldering irons that I'd used before (I've had both those jaycar ones you listed above before). It was like night and day, soldering became enjoyable instead of a chore! I've replaced tips on it once and you can pickup a large variety of them from a couple of online electronics stores.
     
  5. zeropluszero

    zeropluszero Member

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    Thanks.
    Was hoping to spend less than $50 if possible. Will definitely keep it in mind though.
     
  6. dakiller

    dakiller (Oscillating & Impeding)

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    Wow, that is quite the soldering task there.

    Here's the thing with soldering large things like this is, power and thermal recovery are key, and you really get what you pay for with this end of the spectrum.

    skip to 20:18 to start to see the difference a cheap iron does v's a good one, with regard to soldering big things


    I can only say that if you really want to do that job, that you spend for at least a FX-888D or other equivalent class iron. Anything less and you are bound to get frustrated and break your video card, because it will do a shit job.
     
  7. zeropluszero

    zeropluszero Member

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  8. millers

    millers Member

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    I have the Atten version of this station. It has been good for my needs for the last 2-3 years (only doing small hobby stuff), especially for the price.

    As above though, for the job you're doing you'd probably want to spend a bit more money to get better quality
     
  9. Azrael

    Azrael Member

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    What is the current hotness in lead-free solders? My last roll of leaded solder is soon to run out, and im going to need more (and havent bought any since about 2003).
     
  10. aXis

    aXis Member

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    God I hate the lead free solder I'm using now, requires a lot more heat than the leaded version and my temp controlled station end up being on the max temp all the time.

    It also and ends up in dry joints very easily if I'm not careful and if I rework it for too long it starts to crystallize. Im super tempted to go back to a leaded version.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2015
  11. Azrael

    Azrael Member

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  12. Mjollnir

    Mjollnir Member

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    Get 63/37 if you can, otherwise 60/40 Sn/Pb lead solder.
     
  13. Azrael

    Azrael Member

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    Ah, so it seems it is just Jaycar that has stopped selling leaded solder, Altronics seems to still sell 60/40. Problem solved.
     
  14. dakiller

    dakiller (Oscillating & Impeding)

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    http://www.oritech.com.au/productDe...N63PB37_275-No-Clean-Solder-Wire-0.64mm-454gm

    This is what I use at home and at work. I've yet to come close to finishing either roll. Doing a lot of mostly SMD work now days, you use it very sparingly there.

    I've yet to touch lead free, only if it is repairing a board that happens to be, and in that case the first thing I'll do is flood the part to remove/rework in lead solder to make it easier to work.
     
  15. KDog

    KDog Member

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    You have to make sure your soldering iron has enough power for lead free solder, it requires a higher tmeperature to work than older pb/sn solder. Cheap soldering irons won't be able to handle it (as will cheap tips not designed for it).

    You should also have seperate tips for lead free and leaded solder, never mix them up and use them for both.

    For SMD only use fresh paste (it does go out of date quickly and if you buy from hobby shops will probably be expired when you buy it).

    I have OKI (Metcal) soldering stations which are fantastic (I also use one at home) but they may be out of budget for a lot of people.
     
  16. kjparker

    kjparker Member

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  17. dakiller

    dakiller (Oscillating & Impeding)

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    Is there any other reason, than just contamination of lead into lead-free that you should do this? I see it mentioned often, but without any justification. As a hobbyist and a small time repairer, I don't care at all about the ROHS standards and being ecological.
     
  18. aXis

    aXis Member

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    I cant find the label on mine but pretty sure it was the Jaycar lead free solder. It's farking horrible.
     
  19. Azrael

    Azrael Member

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    Yeah, the Goot and Hako stations will handle the temps fine, but i still prefer leaded.

    Annoying, i went into the Melb CBD store yesterday and they were saying they didnt sell it anymore, OHS etc.

    Will hit up Altronics today when i head down to KegKing.
     
  20. Bravs

    Bravs Member

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    For leaded solder we usually use Multicore / AIM water soluble or no clean.
    PB-Free we use SN100C.

    Have some shitty solder we received from a supplier its a Alpha Cleanline 7000 no-clean, have a few rolls if anyone is interested.
     

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