Consolidated Soldering and Rework thread

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by trackhappy, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. CTMS

    CTMS Member

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    For lead free soldering Sn99/Cu0.7 is the most common lead free alloy available from your local hobbyist shop. This is because is the cheapest alloy to make. It has a melting point of 227°C

    The lead free alloy used in a lot of service and manufacturing companies is SN100C. This alloy is the closest appearance and flow wise to leaded solder. It contain Sn/Cu/Ni and has a melting point of 227°C. SN100C is a eutectic alloy and stays wetter longer to ensure the solder joint wets well. The 030 flux medium is also a very good flux that is used inside the SN100C solder and this helps the solder flow, doesn't stink and is no clean and leaves a clear residue.
    It's only available in 500g rolls but if you are looking to buy a roll of solder that will last you a while, might as well use one of the better lead free alloys on the market.

    In Qld the SN100C is sold through RMS Parts
    http://rmsparts.com.au/productsearch.ews?stocksearch.ewdsearchterm=sn100c

    In VIC SN100C is sold through Radio Parts
    http://www.radioparts.com.au/search-products?productsearch=sn100c

    In NSW SN100C is sold through Okay technologies
    http://www.okay.com.au/okay2009/ind...sCsid=tqrhuv708lltj28boe20ir6lc7#.VgP1nNzouP8

    For leaded soldering 63/37 is the alloy used to manufacture 95% of leaded electronics pcbs around the world.
    For touch up and rework 60/40 is commonly used as it is commonly available in shops and is slightly cheaper (but not much) to buy as it contains less Tin.
    Can 60/40 be mixed with 63/37?
    Sure, both alloys have a similar melting point 63/37 183°C and 60/40 183-188°C. The difference between the two is 63/37 is a true eutectic alloy and has an exact melting point. 60/40 has a ranging melting point and goes through a "cluggy" stage where it is not a liquid nor solid. It's in this stage where any vibration can result in poor solder joint quality.
    Will 60/40 work as well as 63/37? Very similar and you probably won't see the difference if your are soldering occasionally.
    But if 63/37 solder wire is available to you then that would be the alloy of choice.

    Mixing leaded and leaded free solders happens a lot in rework when people are not fans of lead free solder. The 63/37, SN100C etc are all alloys that have been tested to ensure they provide a reliable solder joint. 63/37 leaded solders melting point is 183°C and SN100C and Sn/Cu alloys has a melting point of 227°C

    Mixing a leaded and lead free alloys will provide you will a solder joint that will look to be okay, but you have now created an unknown alloy composition with a unknown melting point. Mixing of leaded and lead free solders happens all the time in the service industry. But if you are looking to repair/produce a reliable product, then mixing of leaded and lead free alloys is not recommend.
     
    schmoove likes this.
  2. aXis

    aXis Member

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    Awesome advice CTMS, I'll be getting some 63/37 and SN100C soon!
     
  3. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Looking at getting a soldering station (getting tired of these cheapo stick things), reading through here seems like most of you guys like the Hakko FX888D, any real reason for that or is it just cheap and good?

    Also wanted to ask about lead-free solder, is it worth changing to and how much harder is it to use than the lead stuff?

    I mostly do wiring stuff but slowly getting into building simple LED circuits and once I get my 3D printer up and running I may build more complicated stuff.

    Thanks :leet:.
     
  4. terrabyte

    terrabyte Member

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    Reliable, good price heaps of spares and accessories :thumbup:. I have the older 888 non-digital, doesn't get used too often, but it's easy just to pull out setup and get on with a job. I baulked at the price compared to my jaycar temp station when I first got it, but there really is no comparison. It turned soldering into something fun rather than a chore.

    I try to stay away from the lead free stuff, can't really remember why but I think it was pretty fiddly.
     
  5. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Cool, all good things :thumbup:, as long as its better than my cheapo 30/60w stick thing from Bunnings I'll be happy.

    Hmm ok, was just curious about it seeing it seems most industry's are going to it.
     
  6. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Question for you guys, is there anywhere in Aus to get decent 63/37 rosin solder around 0.30mm - 0.50mm?

    Preferably without having to spend $50+ (including shipping).

    Thanks :thumbup:.
     
  7. dakiller

    dakiller (Oscillating & Impeding)

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  8. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Thanks I'll have a look at them.

    Few more questions and then I should be good,

    I thought no clean flux was kind of a pain in the ass to work with and in some cases could be conductive, is that true?

    With no clean solder do you have to use no clean flux pens and wick or can you use rosin based?
     
  9. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    No Clean flux is exactly that, you don't have to do any cleaning after the soldering is done - makes the job nice 'n quick and supposedly environmentally friendly afterwards, if you're picky about your soldering and/or need to seriously examine your work results then you'd clean it off regardless. Rosin based usually means Time To Get The Cleaning Gear Out to get the sticky and sometimes slightly corrosive shit off the board.

    And soldering flux isn't conductive, it's simply there to clean any oxidation etc off the surfaces you're soldering to so the solder will bond properly.

    There is a noted "flaw" in No-Clean flux but only in certain circumstances though. As the acidic cleaning action is actually by heat the cleaning/corrosion-attacking action can be reactivated if the board temps get too high during normal device operation. But the temps required for that to occur are usually up towards the eutectic point of the solder anyway, so unless you're working with military-grade equipment you can ignore this... :)

    Where Rosin (and the associated messy dicking about afterwards) does win every time over No-Clean is the cleaning action in rosin-based fluxes is often 'way higher - if/when I'm working on gear that's got grotty shit on the surfaces (marine-based stuff that's been exposed to salt air for example) then I'll drag out the rosin-based solder and/or the nasty SMT flux paste I've got here and to hell with the ozone layer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  10. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Cool, thanks :D.

    Now to buy me a new soldering setup :leet:.
     
  11. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Ah ok, is the no clean stuff hard to clean?
     
  12. CTMS

    CTMS Member

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    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
  13. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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  14. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Nup. I usually use suitable isopropryl alcohol (BP grade if/when I can get it, and not rubbing alcohol) and a toothbrush.

    Messy as hell though, you also have make sure all the components/any plastics don't get attacked by the alcohol. And some board coatings don't like it either, last crowd I worked for up here used one that meant had to wash it all off then recoat.

    And fer God's sake make sure you do it in a well ventilated area - was at one small workshop where the aircon had shut down, idiot next to me dropped his jar of it and hadn't told anyone. Putting aside the potential fire/explosion hazard we ended up floating out of there zonked out on the fumes... :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2016
  15. Aussiejuggalo

    Aussiejuggalo Member

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    Thanks for the help guys, ended up getting this nice little setup.


    Click to view full size!


    Hakko FX888-D.
    Rubber cleaner for the FX888.
    T18-D16 1.6mm chisel tip.
    Multicore X39 60/40 0.56mm 250g No-Clean solder (they sold out of the 63/37 and the lead time was 6 weeks :thumbdn:).
    CircuitWorks No-Clean flux pen.
    Solder-wick 1.5mm x 5ft.
    C.K Ecotronic ESD flush cutters.

    All up it cost me $267.58 with free shipping from Mektronics, although it did take a week before they sent it.
     
  16. Menthu_Rae

    Menthu_Rae Member

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    I am looking for a soldering station for myself and my workplace. Was looking at the Thermaltronics TMT-9000S-2 but it seems to be discontinued? :( :thumbdn:

    I am after something relatively high-end, but it seems like the Metcal MX-500 that is like for like with the TMT-9000S is double the price.

    Does anyone have any recommendations? Soldering work usually consists of SMD parts, 0.4-0.65mm pitch, 0805/1206 at the moment - but looking to step down to 0603.
     
  17. dakiller

    dakiller (Oscillating & Impeding)

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    I had a Hakko 951 at my last job, was a pretty good bit of kit. Have a JBC CD-B now and I rate it better than the Hakko in heating speed and temperature control

    Got a hot air station yet?
     
  18. CTMS

    CTMS Member

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    Thermaltronics systems are now distributed Australia wide by Jaycar and they have the TMT-2000S-K model in every store for you to view. They will not have the TMT-9000S-2 in store but they do have them in their distribution warehouse

    https://www.jaycar.com.au/55w-470khz-esd-safe-pb-free-soldering-station/p/TS1584
     
  19. Matthew kane

    Matthew kane Member

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    For that money I'd rather get the Hakko FX888D or a better used/B stock Metcal soldering station. The Weller WD1003 station is great but not sure if you can get one through an Aussie distributor as I purchased mine from a UK distributor years back.

    I've used that exact station years back and it was a POS.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
  20. chip

    chip Member

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    So I've got an APC UPS network interface board with a physically broken component, it seems to be a little inductor of some sort. PCB label is L101


    Click to view full size!


    What's a good way to go about confirming its specs and sourcing a replacement? I have other working boards of the same type to compare it with.
     

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