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Cooking pizza dough all the way through and stopping pizza getting soggy.

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Foliage, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    So sometimes I make pizzas or calzones in the oven but now and then they get burnt on the bottom and soggy and the dough not completely cooked yet the outside is really nice.

    Same goes for the calzone, tastes delicious but to get it 100% cooked through the outside gets too crunchy.

    I was told to set the oven about 250 for a calzone, but mine maxes out at 230c, is it because it isn't hot enough? Or is it too hot and longer at a cooler temperature would be more effective?

    I've got a stone which I use now and then which puffs the base up really nice but I have the same issue, burnt bottom, slightly soggy pizza. It isn't bad, they still taste delicious, but I'd love to make them perfect.

    Any suggestions would be great! :)
     
  2. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    don't put so much topping on.

    if your oven has a bake/grill option, try using that as well.
     
  3. Grom Hellscream

    Grom Hellscream Member

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    Fan forced oven? Non fan ovens can do that because 75% of the heat is concentrated underneath the pizza when the element is on.
     
  4. caspian

    caspian Member

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  5. OP
    OP
    Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    It is fan forced, maybe it is just too much topping, however how are you meant to do a calzone, they are thick as?
     
  6. plasticbastard

    plasticbastard Member

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    I guess it comes down to several things:

    How thick the base is, what sort of moisture content you're mixing your dough too (eg, 65%, 50% hydration, etc) & how much topping you're putting on top, especially with regards to sauce.

    If you've got a super hydrated dough, try reducing the hydration & use a different flour.

    If you're making your dough base really thick, thin it down.

    If you're using a million litres of sauce, reduce it so that when you spread the sauce out, you can still see the base beneath - the sauce should be only thick enough to be just able to see the base beneath. You want to get as much heat into the top as the bottom, and by completely covering the top, the amount of heat you can get there is reduced.

    You're using a pizza stone, so keep using that, you can also try pre-heating the oven for a hour or so, then switching over to grill - this will only work if you've got an oven that has the grill in it rather than a separate grill.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    Yeah thought about switching to the grill, might try that next time.
     
  8. PostModern

    PostModern Angry Brewer

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    Part-bake the base before putting the toppings on!
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    Brilliant idea!
     
  10. PostModern

    PostModern Angry Brewer

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    Works a treat for me. Recently had a pizza cook-up and even the pizzas with runny sauce and tons of "wet" toppings came out yummo. Lots of yeast in the dough, so the bases rose a bit on the first bake. Once they just, just started to brown, we pulled them out and topped them. Delicious :)
     
  11. mrs dan77

    mrs dan77 Member

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    For a calzone, can you flip it halfway through?

    And yeah, don't overload your pizza!

    I don't have a grill in my oven. I place my pizza stone in the oven to heat up on max for about 1/2 hour. I prepare my pizza while this is happening on some baking paper. I can then transfer it across still on the paper, without loosing any heat from my stone.
    Also, below the base on top of the paper I sprinkle a layer of semolina. You won't notice it once cooked, but it helps stop the base from burning.

    Sunday night is pizza night at my place!! :weirdo:
     
  12. hdkhang

    hdkhang Member

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    Maybe let the pizza stone heat up at oven's max heat for half an hour before cooking. Once you pop the pizza in, lower the heat down to 200.
     
  13. aXis

    aXis Member

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    I sometimes part-bake the bases too because I find it way to hard to transfer a fully loaded raw base across to the stone. Afterwards, grilling would then work better than baking as long as the rest of the oven is hot.

    Alternatively, I usually prepare the pizza on the pizza stone directly when it is cold. It will take the stone a bit ot time to heat up and that prevents overcooking the base.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2011
  14. SenorGrande

    SenorGrande Member

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    Has anyone tried those pizza dishes which have a perforated bottom? I'm wondering if they actually help because the holes, in theory, should allow some better penetration of the heat...
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Foliage

    Foliage Member

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    Metal/stone is a better conductor of heat than air, usually why the bottom burns and the top is soggy.

    At the same time you need the heat to make the dough puff up though.
     
  16. SenorGrande

    SenorGrande Member

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    I have used a stone and I also sometimes just use foil but with either I found that the bottom tended to be very soggy but the top was not. I use a shitty non-fan forced gas oven as well which possibly does not help.
     
  17. The King

    The King Member

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