cooling below ambient why not invert the mobo

Discussion in 'Extreme and Water Cooling' started by xc351, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. xc351

    xc351 Member

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    Just wondering if you are cooling below ambient why dont you just invert the mobo so water would not drip onto the pc? Sure it may require a fan or 2 on power delivery.ram just to keep air moving and avoid heat soak.

    Should mention im not considering this ect but i do have a 2hp water chiller here hahaha
     
  2. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    Condensation doesn't only form on the bottom. You don't need drips to make something wet.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    xc351

    xc351 Member

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    No but water wouldn’t bead off and get arround the socket. So in theory you would just use a grease on the socket and be done with it rather then packing arround socket with putty and absorbent towel
     
  4. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    I used to park my whole rig outside in -3° when I was overclocking, at 3am in Melbourne :lol: with the whole case opened up and a 200mm fan pointed at the (vertical) mobo, and never had an issue, but in the middle of winter at 3am in Melbourne the humidity is low and the dew point correspondingly so. I had the entire (custom water) rig outside though, so the delta between ambient and sub ambient was not existent - in fact the loop was warmer than ambient, so the opposite situation to sub-ambient. I just had a power cable and a HDMI cable coming inside so I didn't have to freeze my nuts off while overclocking.

    Running sub-ambient in a warmer environment I imagine would be more problematic. Not even going to try thinking about the physics that might apply, I'd just be inclined to say that if it worked, everyone who uses sub-ambient would do it. Sounds like a cool idea in theory, but I suspect the practice might be completely different.
     
  5. Sunder

    Sunder Member

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    Condensation forms on both sides of the motherboard. So even if the CPU side dripped away from the motherboard, the back of the motherboard would still get condensation and have nowhere to go, eventually beading/pooling and shorting something.
     
  6. Sunder

    Sunder Member

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    No? I will :p

    [​IMG]

    Every day is different, but let's use averages. Average for Melb in Feb apparently is 26*C, average year round is 68% relative humidity. (Yeah, sorry, I'm not spending that much time on this).

    Do some rounding, let's call it 27*C today, 70% RH. Look up the table where those two meet, and anything that is under 21*C will form condensation. That's not really going to give you a lot of overclocking headroom.

    By definition, on a day that there is 100% humidity, condensation will form on anything not actively heated.

    I had considered programming this chart into Arduino, and making it control a peltier that would bring the water down to 1-2*C above dew point (The temperature in the middle of the chart), but it really doesn't help for day to day overclocking. Let's just say it's a 24*C day. On the 100% humidity days, the water can't be chilled below 24*C, which means I can't do much overclocking. When RH goes down to say 20%, I can chill the water almost to freezing, but unless I manually change the overclock from the 24*C days, my computer won't overclock itself...

    So you can see why people use the expanda-foam, silicone, anything else method, rather than just orienting it one way or another.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
    DanglingPointer, Deeb0 and Ratzz like this.

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