cornered myself into getting a dog

Discussion in 'Pets & Animals' started by warrenr, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. warrenr

    warrenr Member

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    Been promising the kids that "Eventually" we would get a dog. I've had dogs myself before so I know exactly how much work is required and costs etc hence my eventually statement.

    Thing is - and to this day - I still don't know why - I agreed to go to the petshop and the missus actually got the kids to hold one......... ie I think the line has been crossed now.

    In my opinion we shouldn't have done this as its massively cruel to the kids (11 and 13 YO so they are old enough) but now we're stuck. They've been begging for a dog for literally years so its not going to away (especially now they've crossed a milestone).

    We've decided on one of these for a couple of reasons. kids are not allergic, dog is relatively small (will be an inside dog), doesn't seem to moult too much, this breed seemed no where near as hyper as the others in the store.

    http://upmarketpets.com/pets/in-store-now/puppies/article.html?ID=8993

    The bad thing is cost$$$$$$$, I don't want a 12 wo puppy, and I know the kids will eventually lose interest once they get one. (I'll end up doing all the work - Ive accepted this but I'd rather avoid it!)

    We've been to the RSPCA, but given my criteria its a long shot that I'll find anything. Kids are checking their website literally hourly which is only fueling their excitement:(

    Anyone going on holidays for a couple of months which fits the criteria that needs their dog looked after???? I'd like to at least give them a "taste" of the work required.
     
  2. power

    power Member

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    I had a dog and horse at that age, what work!?

    Teaches responsibility IMO.
     
  3. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I have a westie. I can stick her on a plane if you like.... :lol:

    Why don't you apply to be a foster family for a dog rescue?
     
  4. mareke

    mareke Member

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    Your kids might tire of a dog but you can't assume that this will happen. You could make it a condition of getting a dog that the kids feed it every day and clean up any mess that the dog makes in the backyard with consequences if they don't do what they agreed to do.

    I had cats when I was a child and one dog and they were all positive experiences. Pets have taught me respect for animals and given back in kind the affection I've given them. Now in my 60s I've the same cat for close on 11 years and cleaning out his litter tray and giving him his daily medication to control his thyroid condition are minor irritations compared to the companionship my cat has provided. I've spent thousands of dollars on food, vet fees etc on my cat and I consider it money well spent.
     
  5. vladtepes

    vladtepes Member

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    Don't limit yourself to RSPCA there are a lot of animal adoption places out there, and they take it seriously.


    Many will send someone out to see if your yard etc is suitable for a dog (i.e. no Kelpies in a unit, that kind of thing).
    This is a protection for both the animal and you :)

    You can volunteer as a foster carer for such organisations, or find a dog there.

    You can also sign up to 'adopt a puppy' (temporary care) for Guide Dogs and care dog organisations.


    Not sure where you are located, but as the pet shop site you linked shows Melbourne, that's what I assume. CLICK HERE
     
  6. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Kids will lose interest. If you can't do the responsibility/commitment then don't get the dog, the kids will cry a bit at first but will get over it.

    There could be unintended consequences of loaning a dog to teach them a lesson, and that is they get attached to the loan dog....and then when it goes back you are in an even further mess, plus being back to square one.
     
  7. danyell

    danyell Member

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    brocolli's fostering suggestion is awesome and will provide a good taster
     
  8. power

    power Member

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    where's the discipline?

    I was made to be responsible, then I understood that when I was told that this action equals these consequences the consequences were real, not just until I got bored.

    Kind of along the lines of you will bloody well eat your dinner not turn your nose up at it - you get that, or nothing.

    If you don't have the stomach to enforce the consequences back the fuck out now and don't let an innocent animal get in the way - do yourself a favour, if you get a pup - take it to obedience training - this should not be optional. It helps the kids form a bond with the animal and teaches them a bit of discipline too.

    Every kid will say "yes please" to a puppy, it's up to parents to enforce looking after it not just fold up in a corner and take over.

    mumble mumble, kids these days #getoffmylawn
     
  9. vladtepes

    vladtepes Member

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    100% on that power.



    Also Obedience training is more about the owners than about the dogs.
    It teaches people how to teach their dogs. It's not as if you drop them off to dog school and they come home educated !

    This is about puppies. Don't foster some broccoli, the kids will hate you. :D
     
  10. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    +1 to what Power says. They'll lose interest but they need that responsibility.

    Look after the dog or lose PC/Game etc etc privileges until you start looking after it again.

    And really if you're getting a small breed dog they won't need much.
     
  11. Ohmigosh

    Ohmigosh Member

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    Made me giggle.

    OP - Consider the foster thing. :thumbup:
     
  12. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    Definitely consider adopting a rescue. Getting a new puppy is great, but is a lot of work and the kids will lose interest.

    Getting a rescue means you avoid a lot of the puppy issues, is cheaper, and you're providing a loving home to a dog that needs it.
     
  13. Johnbu

    Johnbu Member

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    Whatever you do, don't buy one from the local shopping centre places as it may be from a puppy farm.

    Either directly from the breeder or from an animal rescue place.
     
  14. 3stars

    3stars Member

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    just say no get them used to disappointment
     
  15. kaspa_lee

    kaspa_lee Member

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    Get a cat.
     
  16. Sico Music

    Sico Music Member

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    Get a rescue dog, or just hold onto one. I currently have one, all food and vet bills are paid for, just got to put up with it until you can teach it not to piss inside then it generally gets adopted lol.
     
  17. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    You don't know that, and the thing with dogs is they don't really let you lose interest because they pester you to play with them. Unlike small animals (rabbits, guinea pigs) that can be ignored in a hutch, a dog will seek you out and make you take interest by sitting on you.

    I have a young girl come and help me clean out my animal enclosures. She's got dogs at her house and she has a cat, and she is still interested in my dog, always wants to bring her in the car or take her to the park. It depends on the kids.

    Fostering an adult dog is a better way to suss out their determination to have a dog (a dog, not just a cute playful puppy). If you foster somebody and like him/her, you can keep it, you don't HAVE to give it back, they are all up for adoption, otherwise it'll get a forever home somewhere else.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    warrenr

    warrenr Member

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    The foster idea looks pretty good actually and could solve all my problems.......but as mentioned the kids do tend to itch when around "some" of our friends dogs - so I guess it "may" depend on the breed. sounds like a great way to trial the whole thing and give a dog a chance as well


    PS I'm definately not interested in a puppy - more like a dog that 6 - 12 months old.

    I doubt the kids will lose interest - they'll play with it forever - they just wont do the hard yards :p (They had a rabbit when younger and loved it. we were all heartbroken when a fox got to it and to this day they still talk about it and want another one. I had to do the move the cage thing, clean its bedding etc - but yeah the kids would always play with it. little critter ended up living in the house during the day just following everyone around).
     
  19. WJR

    WJR (Banned or Deleted)

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    And yet so many winners get a dog then when the novelty wears off it's left in the back yard bored shitless, barking at the sky and annoying everyone within a kilometer radius. Not saying the OP will do this but it seems to be pretty common in my area.
     
  20. cbb1935

    cbb1935 Guest

    A few things to note re Spitz cross breeds:
    1. Spitz aren't a hyperallergic breed.
    2. They are a high energy dog despite their size.
    3. They can bark.. A LOT!!
    4. The can be nippy.
    5. They shed hair.. A LOT!!

    In regards to getting a dog, if you were in Sydney Monikas Doggie Rescue allow people to take their adoption dogs for walks.

    Rescue dogs are great, but I have heard of a few tales before about dogs starting to turn in personality shortly after rehoming, and requiring to be returned. With kids involved, I'd err on side of caution.

    Breeders are a good source of great personality and stable dogs. If you can find one with a retiring breed bitch that is worth looking into. Most will be a few years old, in excellent health, have all relevant DNA tests done for degenerative diseases, and can often be bought on a no breed policy without papers for much cheaper.

    www.dogzonline.com.au is a great resource for such things.

    Given a potential allergy (I'm not allergic to dogs but every so often get hives from our one)... I'd stick with Poodles or poodle crossbreeds (groodle/labradoodle/mini labradoodle/cavoodle/etc). They rarely shed, they are pretty quiet dogs, and well suited to inside life.

    Food for thought there anyway..

    Another thing .. don't undervalue the potential health and psychological benefits of a dog. Remember a dogs love is unconditional..... even when your having the shittiest day, they can cheer you up.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2016

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