Dell launches $700 Ubuntu Linux netbook onto Australian market

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by -=N0N@ME420=-, May 20, 2009.

  1. -=N0N@ME420=-

    -=N0N@ME420=- Member

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    http://apcmag.com/Content.aspx?id=3919

    If you like Dell’s netbooks but aren’t so keen on the company’s choice of OS (you can have Windows XP or, err, Windows XP) then the Latitude 2100 could find its way onto your shopping list.

    Standard to all models is the almost mandatory Intel Atom N270 processor, a VGA port, memory card reader, 802.11b/g wireless and Gigabit Ethernet. In common with other models in the commercial Latitude family as opposed to the consumer Inspiron line, the Latitude 2100 also comes with next business day on-site service rather than return-to-dealer service.


    woooooooooooooooooooooot
     
  2. cleary

    cleary Mental in the Face

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    Great - we've been trialling netbooks running with ro-root filesystems with our sales staff, so far the AAO has been the pick of the bunch due to
    a) linux preinstalled (if you want the product to ship with linux, you have to create demand)
    b) larger keyboard than average 8.9" netbooks
    c) hardware is supported out of the box with free drivers

    If dell can nail those three items, plus provide the NBDOS support then they will be be far ahead of the pack for my consideration...

    ps I know it's a 10.1" not an 8.9", but that's an even better size for these staff imo, it's just that I was struggling for 10.1"-ers that met the above criteria.

    pps I see it even has Function keys! No mention of bluetooth though ...

    ppps they are coming up on the dell site now: http://www1.ap.dell.com/content/pro...aptop-latitude-2100?c=au&l=en&s=bsd&cs=aubsd1 - it does include bluetooth, and apparently has a touchscreen option too
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2009
  3. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Awesome save me buying a Dell Mini 10 and paying the MS Tax.
     
  4. Oblong Cheese

    Oblong Cheese Member

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    That's awesome!

    Now if I ever find a use for a "netbook", I'll know I can buy a Dell. :D
     
  5. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Hooray! Finally Dell Australia catches up with the rest of the world.

    It was a long time coming, but I'm glad we finally get the choice.
     
  6. Crinos

    Crinos Member

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    Any word on a price? I don't personally have a Dell premier login... I could find out from Procurement, but if someone has a price handy, I wouldn't need to ;)

    Interesting that it's in the business line-up only. I'll be really impressed when they start pushing it on the consumer niche(e.g. Inspiron) models.

    EDIT: Note to self: read the thread title you clown... can this price be confirmed?
     
  7. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Is essentially the same as a Mini 9" but with a 10" screen, the biggest plus is that Mini 9 is the model that they bundle with a mini pci 3G card with Vodaphone and Optus making it perfect for commute web browsing. Since i do most of my work with a CLI its a perfect size for mobile support of customers.

    +++ if like me you use Vi/M for your coding IDE then you will also have an awesome mobile development system so poo poo to GUI based IDE's, so any long commute can be productive, or you could just spam these forums on the way to work.

    My C710TU is a 15.4" and on a crowded train is no good, so I lose 30mins of my 1hr travel because of space, the other 30mins I can work with a 3G USB Modem, but a compact built in system was my next upgrade.
     
  8. shtonkalot

    shtonkalot Member

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    I like so much of this netbook but it seems like I still cannot find one yet that meets my wants.
    The immediate problems with this one are the screen resolution (576 vert pixels is not enough!) and I think the memory is upgradeable but not replaceable.. It sounds (from Dell's product page) like this netbook has 1GB soldered on and then a slot for adding more RAM. Why not just make 2 slots?

    I have issue with the description of the display too, "LED Display" I take it means LCD Display with LED backlights or are Dell suggesting this has an OLED screen (I don't think so)?

    Come on Dell you nearly had me with the mini 10 and then this looked so close too.

    But this has some redeeming features too, I like the look. I think the rubber coating is pretty cool. Sounds tough enough for a netbook too.
    I don't care about the OS it comes with as I'll wrangle my choice on whatever but I do greatly approve of not having to pay for a Windows licence I won't use.

    So some nice differences and a lot of OK sames as the other netbooks. Unfortunately for me it still has a few negatives that make it a no buy for me.
    Higher res 10" screens is what I'd like to see become the norm, 768 pixels high would do.
     
  9. Oblong Cheese

    Oblong Cheese Member

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    Sounds like you have found an excellent use for it - but like I said, I don't have one. My train trips are only 20 minutes and I typically spend that time reading.

    If it came with all the things you wanted it would be more expensive. Unfortunately that would place it in the near $1000 range and be within competition of the myriad cheap 15.4" fullsize laptops on the market (which admittedly, don't have a much better screen resolution despite the larger screen size) -- anyway, Dell wants to sell these netbooks to "normal people", and normal people don't pay $1000 for a 10" netbook when they could just as easily pay $1000 for a 15.4" laptop. It's still a niche market.
     
  10. shtonkalot

    shtonkalot Member

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    It has an option for touch screen and I don't want that...
    All I wanted is a higher res screen and that needn't cost much more, I think they will become more the norm in the future anyway so I'll just wait...
    The only other real problem I have is the RAM configuration which I'm not sure is even the case. I don't think it would cost a lot to add 2 slots for RAM and use one instead of soldering onboard. Yes it would add to the manufacturing cost but not much.
    I don't think for those two additions you would need to add $300 to the sales price.
     
  11. Deanodriver

    Deanodriver Member

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    Nice, but ugly.

    I'd definitely be interested in a Linux version of the Mini 9, though.
     
  12. Afurotsu

    Afurotsu Member

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    This, to me, is the best looking netbook out there. "Attractively utilitarian" is how I'd describe it :lol:.

    Now if it had a 6-cell battery and a 600+ pixel high screen, I'd snap it up in an instant.
     
  13. stmok

    stmok Member

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    I'll be honest here, I'm not fond of netbooks.

    Its seems more like a price overcharge for size and under-performance. (I'm a fan for bang per buck.)

    Maybe Intel's upcoming Consumer Ultra Low Voltage (CULV) platform is a better choice?

    If all else fails, a refurbished 14inch ThinkPad T-series will do me!
    ($700 to $800 can get you a Core Duo one!)
     
  14. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    ARM is where it's at. That family of CPUs is king of low power performance, and has far superior instant-sleep/instant-resume support. If you're not convinced, play a Nintendo DS, shut the lid mid-game, open it back up and keep playing to see how well ARM handles that.

    The current market prediction is that we'll start to see $250-$300 netbooks (not glorified PDAs or smartphones, but full blown general-purpose mini laptops) sporting ARM processors hitting the consumer market by the end of the year. Folks like Acer, Asus, MSI and others are all working furiously on their own versions. They realise there's a big market gap between $0 and $700, and that browsing the web on a mobile phone stinks.

    I make my living as a sysadmin, and for me they're looking like a fantastic little unit. I crave instant-on, low-power, long-life battery units that are easily portable between sites. I need a proper qwerty keyboard and both wired and wireless networking (and perhaps even 3G, but USB plugin can suffice there in a pinch). Current x86 offerings don't cut the mustard, as they chew way too much battery.

    I'm currently holding off on all netbook purchases until ARM units start appearing on the market. Then I'll definitely be grabbing two (one for my work, and one for the wife around the house).
     
  15. Oblong Cheese

    Oblong Cheese Member

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    Intel owns this market place at the moment. AMD and VIA have nothing to compete with the Atom (yet?).
     
  16. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I think the stat I read was that for every x86 CPU sold by any manufacturer, 10 ARM CPUs are sold.

    No, they're not generally in PC-style computers yet. But I'm hoping that will change soon. There's a massive market for low-power PCs for basic tasks. With distributions like Ubuntu already actively working on ARM ports, the home PC is about to take a massive nose-dive in price.

    I'm also keen to see what that can do for education, and where that leaves Microsoft and their very bloated OSes in the future. :)
     
  17. stmok

    stmok Member

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    I didn't know about the instant sleep/resume ability.

    I've only seen the ARM-based Cortex A8 in action (in the form of OMAP3530 at 600Mhz) on the BeagleBoard. => http://beagleboard.org/

    I'm holding out for an OMAP4xxx based solution. (Dual-core, 1Ghz, etc).
     
  18. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    The ARM A8 and A9 can both scale quite easily to around 1.2GHz. The OpenPandora (based on the Beagleboard) allows scaling from 400Mhz to 1.2GHz via standard controls presented to the end user. Battery life suffers at higher clockspeeds of course, but the option is there and the CPU supports it natively (unlike x86 CPUs which by and large are sold at restricted speeds for marketing reasons).

    The other notable feature of ARM is that there are many inherent security flaws with x86 at a hardware level that lead to some of the more common attacks on operating systems running on x86 hardware. ARM hardware misses out on a lot of this, and from a security perspective certainly is a more tempting platform (which makes them a nice choice especially for things like routers and firewalls).

    I certainly don't want to come across as anti-x86. x86_64 provides for a nice mid-range and accessible platform for a lot of things. But the mid-range is not suited to tasks where high calculation rates or low power usage are the target requirement. For those reasons, I'm far more excited about GPGPU and Cell style processors at the high end, and ARM for the low-power end of the market. Horses for courses, and all that.

    [edit]
    Oh, and the other thing I like about ARM is the variety of vendors who ship it. Licensing is easily acquired, and many different vendors ship ARM architecture. The obvious ones are ARM Holdings themselves and Texas Instruments, but people like Connexant, Marvell, Intel (XScale is ARM arch), Nvidia and ATI all make ARM processors. It's a massively successful market for all vendors, despite the large amount of competition. That in turn means it's great for consumers too.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2009
  19. pipsqeek

    pipsqeek Member

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    I think it's great that they have finally arrived in Australia. Now we just need a full laptop option with it and a desktop option with it that any consumer can easily access on their website, buy it, take delivery and enjoy a good linux experience that Dell made possible thanks to providing their own driver development.

    I'll be buying one, if for any reason to show my support.

    Cheers
    pip
     
  20. cleary

    cleary Mental in the Face

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    Last edited: Jun 11, 2009

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