Does anyone have NBN - what's it like?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by antipody, Apr 9, 2013.

  1. nwatts

    nwatts Member

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    Would FTTH be much faster than my ~110mbps Telstra cable? I know the uploads would be way faster, just haven't heard from many people on whether it can top cable for downloads.

    Wifi is the bottleneck for me... average around 70mbps unless I am sitting on top of the router, which defeats the purpose of wifi to begin with....
     
  2. -=Ac3=-

    -=Ac3=- Member

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    Same here with the ftth plan and not the nbn. Still can't work out the difference? My guess is because its in a relatively new estate?
     
  3. boris_

    boris_ Member

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    FTTH would be faster in most cases, unless you were the only cable user in your area (cable bandwidth is shared per street or something like that).
    Plus, FTTH is limited to 100MBit only by choice of switch at the Exchange end (I'm assuming). If NBN wanted they could roll out 1GBit, 10GBit or 40GBit speeds, providing there was a demand (business may drive this).
     
  4. Primüs

    Primüs Member

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    NBN is FTTH (currently), however NBN is the network owner/builder in this instance.

    Any number of customers could build FTTH in different areas, but they would be owned by different people.

    Ultimately, your FTTH (or the other posters) is simply a FTTH network another company built.

    The main difference between the 2 will ultimately be nothing, if not price. NBN is meant to be 'regulated' and all access seekers get the same price, no bulk discounts for the bigger players.

    A more full private owned (and smaller) network can realistically set whatever price they want as long as they find it profitable. That could mean they charge a lot, because they know it will take a long time for NBN to build out there considering the neighbourhood is already FTTH, or they could charge very little, to try and undercut the NBN and retain customer base.

    Edit: forgot to multi quote:

    Ultimately yes, FTTH appears to be artificially limited to 100mbit. Im sure cable is too I think it can technically achieve faster then 110mbit.

    Upload speed makes a big difference to browsing experience, to an extent, also Fibre Optic should be a lot smaller response time in the leg between you and your providers edge routers, which also can give a great feeling of snappyness in responses and processing. There is a big difference browsning on a 5ms connection to a 30+ms connection
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 15, 2013
  5. dean_is_not

    dean_is_not Member

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    You're an outlier though. Not everone can get speeds like that, if at all. That's what the NBN is meant to fix.
     
  6. iinsom

    iinsom Member

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    Isnt NBN and FTTH the same thing? (Just ones done all through node and their nbn service is done through nbnco lines?) Or am i totally wrong.
     
  7. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    NBN fibre is FTTH, however not all FTTH is NBN.

    it basically comes down to who owns the fibre.

    in the past few years some new housing estates have been built with FTTH provided by a third party provider.
    the third party provider is usually the only provider you can choose as the fibre is not open access.

    at some point i imagine NBN will either integrate that fibre into their network (buying it from the current owner) or they will just overbuild it with their own fibre.
     
  8. iinsom

    iinsom Member

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    But basically, the service is the same (as in same fibre connections, so an Internode FTTH service would be the same ul/dl as nbnco fibre connection? assuming internode use their own fibre in the first place?)

    Im just trying to compare for when it finally hits my area (hopefully)
     
  9. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    NBNCo is the 'last mile' carrier; there will only be one.

    You don't choose NBNCo, you choose an ISP that buys services from NBNCo. The quality of your service (ie throughput, latency, jitter, reliability etc) are a result of that ISP's investment in their network, and is more difficult to measure and certainly prone to the usual "I'm with DODO and my service IS FINE" junk.

    As for which ISP to choose, that's up to you. Whingepool is the standard barometer for ISP customer satisfaction.
     
  10. shadowman

    shadowman Member

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    Not specifically. NBN is usually referred to the FTTH installed by NBN Co, a GPON install. FTTH through other sellers is usually estate fibre or some other form of fibre installed by a third party (that may or may not be bought out by NBN down the track). Those installs could be anything from GPON, PON or AON, depending on how installed it and for what reasons.
     
  11. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    NBN is unlikely to be worse than any current FTTH deployments.

    the biggest difference is likely to be upload speeds.
     
  12. miicah

    miicah Member

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    I want the fucking NBN. That is what my first post was about.
     
  13. iinsom

    iinsom Member

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    Sorry, i realise NBNCo are just the carrier, just as Telstra are the major carrier for the phone lines in my area. I'll be going with Internode for my fibre connection (if it comes) because the last adsl connection i had with them, their service was amazing (i changed to cable for the download speed, cause i was so far from the exchange)

    I was more talking about the FTTH vs NBN Fibre speeds, considering theyre basically the same fibres, just installed by 2 different companies (I've worded just about everything ive said in the past 2-3 posts horrible haha)

    But they're basically the same fibres with theoretical max speeds?

    Which is basically all i want the NBN for. Streaming goodness (Does internode charge for uploads on their ftth/nbn services?)

    Damn they do :(
     
  14. mrturkey

    mrturkey Member

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    You can only choose from what ISP's are available at the location. As I understand it, the ISP still has to install equipment in the NBN exchange facility.

    Lucky me, I get to choose between Telstra and Activ8me. :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

    My NBN equipment was installed yesterday and I have my appointment tomorrow for the ISP I went with to supply and install their router.
     
  15. shadowman

    shadowman Member

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    Not necessarily. You can get single or multimode fibre and to varying qualities (we haven't yet reached a point in technology that we will know if fibre deteriorates over time). If Internode's fibres are multimode, they won't be suitable for single mode.

    You also have to take into account the equipment on the end of the fibres, PON/GPON are fairly simple, GPON has an optical splitter at the 'node', splitting into 32 individual fibres (which in the NBN will be shared to 16 premises). AON is more complex and involves equipment in the node (batteries, boards, etc) as opposed to an optical splitter (which is fairly simple and resistant to weather, etc).

    All of those sorts of networks are FTTH, with varying degrees of complexity, redundancy, sustainability and bandwidth. They may be easily converted to NBN or not.

    Basically, in the end you want acces to some sort of fibre (for potential upgradeability down the track) and the option of at least 100Mbps speeds.
     
  16. caspian

    caspian Member

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    fine, so why are you complaining about how DSL was engineered?

    you best be voting Labor, and encouraging everyone you know to do the same if you want fibre any time in the foreseeable future.
     
  17. martino

    martino Member

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    This service is likely provided via the Opticomm FTTH network. They've been building fibre broadband networks in greenfields housing estates for a number of years now but are a niche player.

    NBN aren't the only ones doing this - along with Opticomm, Telstra and TransACT (now iiNet) also have similar pockets of fibre to the home around the place also.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  18. evilasdeath

    evilasdeath Member

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    All street fibre is singlemode (well 99.999999% of it some stupid corporate people have probably tried)

    There has been fibre in the ground for probably 20 years now and its still being used. I think when they initially laid much of it they said 15 years, but they keep on extending that figure. The optical fibre and all the protective tubes/coverings is pretty solid i honestly don't see it degrading much in 100 years.

    Once you strip the outer sheath thou it becomes a different story thou, the individual fibres become brittle and can be difficult to work with, and difficult to get a clean cleave if you need to re-splice it. However if you build it and don't touch it then its fine. This all happens within a splice enclosure anyway. If things become to bad then chop it strip back some fresh fibre and then you are all good again.

    But even thou it gets like that we have less problems with the fibre itself and more problems with the older Splice enclosures of which some of the early ones were poorly designed and are falling apart.


    As for the maximum speed on optical fibre i tried to think about it awhile ago and the number is massive.

    Think about early Galileo early attempts to measure the speed of light standing on 2 hills with 2 lanterns.

    If you open and close a flap on a lantern you can send a message across a distance, what is the limit? It's how fast the person can flap the lantern and how fast the other person can decode it.

    Fibre turns a light on and off damn fast, and then the detector deciphers it. The bit in the middle is just attenuation, it's a little dimmer.

    So the maximum speed lies at the point where i can send the minimal amount of photons and lose them and still be able to detect it.

    And thats only one wavelength! Multiple wavelengths will multiply that again. Many systems already do 64 wavelengths easy.

    10G PON already exists so we already have an upgrade beyond what NBN is installing now, Tony Abbot can't fathom 100mbit let alone 1g/10g in the future.
     
  19. OldMate

    OldMate Member

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    saw an article that said Tokyo and some surrounding areas are installing infrastructure that will have 2gb down 1gb up.
    Now that's what I want.
     
  20. iinsom

    iinsom Member

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    I read that too (Japan from memory)

    Thanks for clarifying that, either way. Fibre is a massive step up from cable for streaming
     

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