E-Reading - where to start?

Discussion in 'Portable & Small Form Factor' started by CoHmodderSolo, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    Hey guys,

    Im thinking about converting my whole library of printed books, magazines, comics, dictionary's, etc to digital format that I can carry around with me anytime, anywhere. I was just wondering, how best to start? I thought of sourcing a 2nd hand Ereader like a Kindle to give it a go first, then if all is good Id sell my printed books and replace them with digital ones.

    Do you guys reckon E-reading is worth it? How did you start your digital library?
     
  2. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    1. No, I don't like reading a screen, I like printed pages. 2. My Kobo came with 100 classic books on it. I am half-way through a story, but I never get around to reading it unless I go to the doctor's when I take it with me if it's charged up (it usually isn't....) You don't have to charge up a normal book.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    True, tho I see the practicality side of it. Having the ability to flick a device on while lying in bed or waiting at the airport and have your entire library there is quite cool I thought.

    Where did you source your Kobo from? Is the 100 classic books deal factory standard or a seller's deal?
     
  4. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I bought my kobo from angus and robertson before they shut down, so I've had it a while. The 100 books was standard on them at the time, but you can download heaps of books which are out of copyright from Project Gutenberg. Getting them all on the unit was good for me because it saved having to download anything to get going with it and it was like buying a real book that you can read, rather than "just another device".

    It sounds convenient to have it all there and it would be if you like the format, I just don't, and I never remember to charge it so I can never just pick it up.
     
  5. BigDave

    BigDave Member

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    My wife reads all her books on her laptop at home, now she wants to try reading them on my tablet while on her lunch break :D

    Personally I tried reading books on night shift but found movies better :wired:
     
  6. Boneman

    Boneman Member

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    I read everything on my phone with the Kindle app. Doesn't feel as good as a real book but the story is the same, and its more economical for me.
     
  7. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    Personally I would say e-reader are only good for travelling, as I prefer reading paper, plus they still work when there is no power.

    I have an old kindle (3G non touch model). Not bad, but my eyes dont like it after a few hours. There is software out there to convert ebooks to other formats, Calibre.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    I also considered using my Galaxy Note 2 as an Ereader. I might give that app a go.

    I downloaded an app to decrease screen brightness pass what the OS lets you so that helps with night reading. I have to admit tho printed books are better than digital format. Maybe in the future when 3D holograms are possible everything would change.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  9. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    I much prefer hard copies. I used an ereader for travel, which is about all its good for, but still much prefer the feel of a good hard book.
     
  10. shredder

    shredder Member

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    The partner and I can't go past tablet reading, for home use. Been doing it the past few years (after a few decades of reading printed books).

    Despite purist scorn from various angles, we wouldn't change to anything else. I even got her a proper Kindle for Xmas one year but it never got used - it just couldn't match the features and tech extras that reading on a proper computing device puts (literally) at the fingertips.

    We found that the various arguments against doing so, simply amounted to nothing in our real world usage, and were far outweighed by the benefits of doing so.

    Of course, this is coming from a pair of geeks who already voluntarily spend several hours per day at a screen. So perhaps this way suits us better than it would others.
     
  11. power

    power Member

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    tablet or phone is pretty amazing for reading, I particularly like putting a bit of music on in the background as well. Mind you I've been reading on mobile devices long before it was cool (used .lits on my WinMo and Microsoft Reader years back and used to read on the bus).

    I use the awesome Moon+ Reader now on Android, and for mags Zinio store - cheaper than Google Mags and others.

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.flyersoft.moonreader&hl=en

    Use it so much I went to the pro from the basic one.

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.flyersoft.moonreaderp&hl=en
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  12. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    I've pretty much converted to using a Kindle for reading. I've done something like 10,000 (printed) pages on it so far.

    Advantages:
    • Small and light - easy to take travelling. Also much easier to read in bed, since you don't have to support a huge book.
    • All books in one place; no need to go looking for the next one in the series
    • Backlight helps when reading in dimly-lit areas.
    • More damage-resistant than a book (a few drops of rain or oily fingers won't damage it).
    • Just closing it and having it remember where you were is pretty nice.
    • Easy to share books. You can have a relative in another country but still have access to the same books.

    Disadvantages:
    • Substantially harder to just flick back and forward. I find that with a book I can say "ah, that'd be about half a centimetre back" whereas with a Kindle I can't do that. Similarly, if you want to go to a whole new book and start at a specific spot, it's much harder.
    • Related to the previous point, the Kindle still doesn't have a way to easily check how many pages are left in the chapter. With a book, I just stick a bookmark in at the next chapter break so it's easy to keep track of how far there is to go.
    • Obviously battery life is an issue, although if you charge it once every few weeks then you never come close to going flat.
    • Pictures are not good. I've managed to crash it with a picture-heavy book. Fine detail on maps is very hard to read, and obviously there's no colour support. For books with pictures that you may actually want to look at in detail, paper (or possibly tablet) wins every time.
     
  13. Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    I love reading off my Nexus 7 or Galaxy S4. Real books irritate me as I like to read at night and moving around a bit and the lighting can be a bit all over the place. Since they run Android they're massively flexible to do just about anything as well.
     
  14. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    My Kobo forgot a couple of times. I don't know why.
    I hate that. I'm always thinking "who's this person?" and need to go back and remind myself. You don't get that same sense of the book as a book, just as pages of text (and the pages are heaps smaller than the page of a book, so you are "turning pages" all the time).
     
  15. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    With the Kindle, I've been wondering; whats the backlighting business? Is it actually a strip of light on the rear outer edge of the case to ease your eyes when reading or something else?

    And crashing with picture heavy books? Really? Some of the books I want to load on to an ereader are those 800 paged aircraft guides or similar with at least 1 detailed picture on every page. So that's not really an interesting feature of the Kindle... is it specifically Kindle related due to its hardware or general problem with ereaders?
     
  16. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    My kobo is an "older" model, but it's awfully slow. There's no way I'd be wanting to look at technical manuals on it. I couldn't imagine how awful that would be and the pages are tiny, you would have to be scrolling about to see anything. The only way I'd want to read that stuff electronically (if I had to) would be on a proper computer monitor.
     
  17. Andres

    Andres Motor Admin

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    eBooks rock. I read every day for >1hr, haven't touched a hardcopy in 3-4 years.

    1) No 'clutter' from books on shelves. Minimalism FTW.
    2) Allows you to fall asleep much more naturally than looking at a tablet.
    3) Much easier to hold than a 'Game of Thrones' paperback monster. Particularly laying on your back, can hold with one hand easy.
    4) Can take on a plane without taking up much space.
    5) Surprising robust. Mine has a few hairline cracks hear and there but still going strong.
    6) If you happen to forget your Kindle, you can at least continue reading the book on your phone/tablet/laptop.
    7)Built in dictionary - seriously is awesome. In the past I'd just deduce what the word means, but now I can actually confirm in about 5 seconds.

    Downsides
    1) Have to charge it once a week (but uses same charger as phone)
    2) Up until recent months, had to shut-down on take-off/landing in planes
    3) Don't have the 'satisfaction' of a shelf full of books to show-off
    4) You don't technically own the books. Rather they are on indefinite loan from Amazon.
    5) Probably spend more on books. It's so easy to buy, and it stops you from buying second hand or lending mates books.

    and the biggest thing as Slatye said:
    Substantially harder to just flick back and forward. I find that with a book I can say "ah, that'd be about half a centimetre back" whereas with a Kindle I can't do that.

    Get a second-hand kinda to get your feet wet.
     
  18. shredder

    shredder Member

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    • These two points, while probably applicable to the popular "Amazon Kindle" line of products, are arguably irrelevant with tablet reading.

      The first because, on the Android reading apps I've used, an overall progress bar (accessible with a tap) allows seeking through the book simply by moving a slider. If you don't have any problems with seeking through a video file then you shouldn't have any with seeking through a book in exactly the same way, using such a system.

      Likewise, app settings allow certain customisations, for example my up/down volume buttons on the tablet are configured for "10 pages forward/10 pages back".

      The second point is generally irrelevant in my experience of tablet reading, as the progress bar also shows divisions in chapters (for ebooks with embedded chaptering, which is most quality ebooks). It's in fact far better than printed reading in that function, in that you can see the entire chapter "chronology" laid out right in front of you. You can see at a glance not just how long till the end of 'this' chapter, but also how long the next chapter will be, how many chapters left to go in the book, etc.

      Switching between Day Mode and Night Mode (with applicable foreground/background colours, and brightnesses) is a big feature of tablet reading.

      The built-in backlighting inherent with tablets goes without saying, and this is a big advantage for indoor and night-time readers (not so for outdoor or highly-sunny-area readers - this is where an E-ink reader does well).

      Other clever little features of Android reading, such as the "skim your finger up/down the left edge to adjust brightness while you read" etc are also cool and practical features of tablet reading.

      The biggest point of contention with tablet reading is the active screen. Some people simply can't get over the idea that reading from a backlit computer screen is bad. This is the whole premise of the "Kindle" and other E-ink reader products. Ironically, on this forum at least, many such people voluntarily spend hours per day at a computer screen doing all sorts of reading and have nary a complaint. I personally (and my partner too) found this to be a complete non-issue, and one entirely overwhelmed by the many advantages.

      I read the entire bloody Wheel of Time on my tablet. :p
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2014
  19. power

    power Member

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    I can safely tell you the ONLY thing I miss is physically being able to tell how much more book I have.

    Even now I just don't get a good idea of how far in I am, and it is the ooonly thing I miss.
     
  20. shredder

    shredder Member

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    You don't have a progress bar in your app? That would seem to be a bit of an omission.
     

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