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Eleven year old photography

Discussion in 'The Gallery' started by Fortigurn, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. Fortigurn

    Fortigurn Member

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    This weekend I was up in a mountain village about three hours from Taipei, where I go regularly for volunteer work (it's an aboriginal village with a lot of issues and has plenty of use for volunteers). On the Sunday I lent one of my cameras to Chen Jia Rou (陳嘉媃), whom I've known since September last year. She's only 11 years old, and she's one of the sweetest, brightest, and most emotionally balanced kids up there. I trusted her to be responsible, and gave her full reign to do as she pleased. I had already noted she had a good eye for photography, and wanted to encourage her.

    I was so impressed with some of the photos she took on Sunday (just looking at them on the tiny camera screen), that I told her mum that when she's older I'll buy her a small camera. Tonight I went through the photos Jia Rou had taken, and had to scrape my jaw off the floor. Call me biased, but I think the girl has raw talent. Nearly every shot was a stunner, for an eleven year old. I would be very happy with a number of these shots.

    She was using my D90 with an 85mm f1.8 lens, and I had turned off the SB 800 to see what she could do with natural light. Ok sure, the camera was on auto (typically shooting at ISO 1250 between f1.8 and f2.8), but the composition is all hers; some of the composition might have been accidentally brilliant, but certainly much of it is her own design. Despite the fact that the camera was on continuous shooting mode, she did not simply blaze away at anything and everything, and typically only took one or two shots of a scene.

    In Lightroom I touched the exposure, contrast, and colour temperature very lightly, just enough to give a little extra emphasis, but nothing to change what she had captured herself. Check these out (first shot is one I took of her with my D7000, 18-200mm and SB800), bearing in mind she's only eleven.

    I think this was one of her best shots, despite the fact that she very likely composed it by accident, aiming for her cousin in the background.

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    She had her cousin pose for these.

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    I watched her set this shot up with care, telling Gao Yun Ru (高韻茹), exactly how she wanted her to pose; she took just two shots, and they were both great.

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    This one she took of me was unposed; I wasn't aware of it.

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    This was another candid shot.

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    I loved this shot she took of the fire.

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  2. adam

    adam Member

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    do you wear a go pro 100% of the time?
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Fortigurn

    Fortigurn Member

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    No, just 100% of the time when I'm shooting in the village. I take photos and video for two volunteer associations, which require footage for reporting and promotional purposes.
     
  4. adam

    adam Member

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    interesting!

    nice shots & a lovely story, thanks for sharing!
     
  5. OP
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    Fortigurn

    Fortigurn Member

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    I used to take a handycam, but it was such a pain swapping between taking video and taking stills (and I'm really not a videographer),that I decided that the GoPro would be much better. It has proved to be an excellent choice; I just turn it on and let it shoot. I have three batteries and a couple of 32GB cards, and typically take several hours of 720p @ 60fps, 170 degrees wide angle. The footage is useable right out of the camera, I don't even bother editing, just slap it up on Youtube.

    Thanks mate. The best part is that a local Taiwanese photographer and videographer I know who visits the village frequently (he takes photos and video to promote the elementary school and its choir), shared my album on Facebook and wrote about it.

    My rough translation.

    This prompted others to comment, and the result was that the photographer suggested a photography camp for the kids be held next year, and one of the teachers at the school said they want to talk about putting photography classes into the school's curriculum. :)
     
  6. DarkYendor

    DarkYendor Member

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    Wow, that's impressive - especially for someone so young without any training. The leading lines and DoF in those shots are brilliant.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Fortigurn

    Fortigurn Member

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    Yep, I was really stunned. She was not simply waving the thing about and hammering the shutter button. There's genuinely good composition here, and I really like the way she frames her subject.

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  8. led_blind

    led_blind Member

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    Quite impressive....

    Perhaps the perspective helps, aka closer to the ground! :)
     
  9. OP
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    Fortigurn

    Fortigurn Member

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    Could be. What really interested me was the fact that she did so well with a prime. When I handed her the camera she tried zooming, so I had to explain this was not a zoom lens. But it's clear she adapted very quickly to the challenge of composing her shots within the limitation of an 85mm full frame lens on a DX camera.
     

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