Encouraging new Linux users to keep using Windows in a VM? Right or wrong.

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by foxmulder881, Oct 2, 2010.

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Encouraging new Linux users to keep using Windows in a virtual machine

  1. Yes. Using Windows in a VM is a good safety net.

    37 vote(s)
    53.6%
  2. No. They should be trying to migrate everything to Linux.

    18 vote(s)
    26.1%
  3. Undecided.

    14 vote(s)
    20.3%
  1. foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    Is encouraging a new Linux user to keep using Windows in a virtual machine the right thing to do?

    I see this a lot in other forums. Users coming into Linux from a Windows environment. And as a safety net, fellow Linux users to tell them to keep using Windows in a virtual machine.

    I disagree with this recommendation and wonder how other people feel about it.
     
  2. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    I think that pushing them to move completely to Linux will just be too much effort. A few will stick with Linux, but most will give up and go back to Windows.

    If they run Windows in a VM, they'll probably eventually move to Linux completely. Does it actually matter how long it takes them to complete the transition?
     
  3. cleary

    cleary Mental in the Face

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    There is no black and white to this, no matter how it polls.

    Some people will not need win applications, and all linux is the best choice
    Some will need win apps and they will work in wine
    Some will need win apps and they will work in a VM
    Some will need win apps and windows will be the best choice

    Treat it on a case by case basis.

    PS I'm not excluding OSX here for any reason other than it wasn't in the initial discussion, but it makes the possibilities even more colourful.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  4. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    My philosophy for all technology.

    Technology is there to meet the needs of people. No two people are alike. Therefore, no two technology solutions will be alike.
     
  5. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    lol - "right or wrong"? That's a very simplistic generalisation and almost borders on a religious opinion ("kill the unbelievers!").

    Elvis' view is spot on - Linux does not do everything perfectly, and neither does Windows. At the end of the day, use the tools that do your job best. I, for one use both environments, but I do tend to use Linux far more heavily overall.

    In my experience, long time users of Windows converting to Linux are better off being weaned of slowly rather than thrown in the deep end, so by all means - give them a VM. Think of it as a nicotine patch. ;)
     
  6. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Heh. Best analogy for Windows ever. :)
     
  7. flinchy

    flinchy Member

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    i think it's pretty much covered so far

    though i do it the other way around, linux in vm's to learn and mess around
     
  8. OP
    OP
    foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    My post may have come across a bit like a dictatorship. I guess I should clear that up as it was not my intention.

    I can only speak for my own experience I guess. I was reliant on dual-booting for a long time. Years in fact. And it was only recently I made the final decision to ditch Windows for good. And it was only after sitting down and really think about why I was still dual-booting in the first place. And to be honest, apart from gaming, there really was no other reason. So I made the hard decision to finally give up gaming for good and focus not only more on my work, but more on getting Linux fully operational and in a position to take care of all my work and desktop needs. And it easily fulfills everything I do.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that if you let yourself be reliant on Windows, whether it be dual-booting or VM's, the harder it is to eventually make to complete migration to Linux. If that's what the user wants of course and if that assuming there is no any real requirement for using Windows.

    Don't even get me started on OSX... :mad:

    That's correct. And that's why I bring this issue up though. If there is no real need to be still running Windows, why let it lurk around like the bad smell that it is?

    Yeah sorry, that's not how I meant to it sound. :lol:

    I have to completely disagree with you here.

    I firmly believe that regardless of which operating system a user is er... using, that very user can easily adapt to their desktop environment. Assuming we are talking about standard and default desktops environments here. It might be a different story if you throw a Windows veteran into something like AwesomeWM, Openbox etc.
    It's not a drug. Habits can change in the wink of an eye if the user allows it to.
    Of course if you have a corporate environment and the boss wants to change all the office PC's over to Linux, I'm not advocating that you rip all the Windows based PC's out overnight and replace them with Linux based PC's. Then you're going to have a situation where the staff are up in arms and in limbo because they have no idea what's going on.
    If a corporate boss did propose such a radical migration, then it could easily be solved by some basic fundamental training in Linux several weeks before the migration so that the staff won't be so shocked when they come to work the next day to find a shiny new CentOS based system on their desk.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2010
  9. BIPyjamas

    BIPyjamas Member

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    I'm half/half about it. If you want to go Linux, then go for it since it's never been easier - although to me real Linux is booting into a CLI because you like getting a text login and manually running startx.

    With regards to the VM, it shouldn't be used so much to ween people off, but rather to provide access to Windows-only applications that you can't substitute. At work, I have a Windows VM only because I can't escape needing to open/create/edit MS Office documents and don't want to FUBAR corporate documents with OpenOffice :lol:

    Just a random thought, but wouldn't it be cool if we could X forward remote Windows applications to a Linux X server. Perhaps an extension to Cygwin that intercepts windowing calls...
     
  10. manicpyro

    manicpyro Member

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    Interestingly enough there's a new open source D3D 10/11 state tracker available for linux so this should be interesting in aiding porting applications across :)
     
  11. Austenite.

    Austenite. (Banned or Deleted)

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    I want my games to work in linux then i'd go completely over to linux, but for now i'm using windows 7 ult. 64
     
  12. Dezza Bot

    Dezza Bot Member

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    My job needs me to use a proprietary VPN client that only runs on Windows XP 32 bit. I can't get in to run in a virtual machine in 7x64, XP mode, or linux. Please tell me how I can boot Linux everyday and still do my job.

    Additional: Why should I change to a different OS when I already know how use this one and it does everything I need?

    These are the questions you are likley to receive from my clients.
     
  13. BIPyjamas

    BIPyjamas Member

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    Surprisingly, the answer to these two questions is probably "don't boot Linux".
     
  14. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Canonical need to drop some green on Gabe and convince him to port Steam officially. :)

    I reckon that alone would boost Linux desktop usage heavily.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2010
  15. Sipheren

    Sipheren Member

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    Its not LINUX but similar type of thing, 2 of our staff recently wanted to move to using Mac's and OSX, I installed VMware for them with Windows.

    Without it, they would be lost, they tend to open Windows a lot to get old Outlook emails and run programs not built for Mac.

    I think having a Windows environment available is a must if you want a smooth transition to the new OS.
     
  16. oohms

    oohms Member

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    I wouldn't 'port' anyone over to linux unless they were a pretty savvy user, and/or i was willing to provide them with support all the time.
     
  17. OP
    OP
    foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    Yeah this can be a slight issue. I could easily migrate my Fathers PC over to Linux tomorrow if I wanted to. But it's the very reason that I'd have to be prepared to support him all the way. Because without it, he wouldn't have a clue what was going on half the time.
     
  18. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I think there's a third category you can add there: the ultra low-end user.

    People who just turn a PC on, do the same 3 tasks every day and shut down again are perfect candidates for Linux.

    I find generally Linux suits the ultra high end and ultra low end of computing users very well (and I speak from many years of experience rolling out Linux to all sorts of individuals, organisations and businesses). It's the middle ground that struggle the most with it (or anything non-Windows, for that matter, and generally by force of habit more than usability or anything else).
     
  19. phonik

    phonik Member

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    I haven't tried to use a linux distro in ages as my main os, and trying to get packages to install and use was a major pain in the arse, in the end I gave up and went back to windows, then ubuntu came out gave it a whirl yeh was nice stuff worked but I still haven't changed from windows and thats probably due to past experiences and I know stuff just works.

    If I were to try again, after many years since my previous trials, I would dual boot or atleast have a vm for windows, and if anyone I knew asked and really wanted to I'd advise them to do the same, it just may make the transition easier.
     
  20. IamDan

    IamDan Member

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    If itunes and gaming was possible i think ALOT of people would convert. Untill some major players start developing for linux i see no reason for an average joe to change over.
     

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