Experiments with sous-vide cooking

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Amfibius, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. damo2002

    damo2002 Member

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    Ordered Saturday, this just arrived!

    Keen as mustard to try the thing out. My absolute first venture into anything sous vide.

    Thinking of trying out some pork chops this arvo. Their app recommends 60 degrees for an hour.
    This was exactly the sort of information I was looking for before I bought it - couldn't find it anywhere! :thumbup: They don't really seem to mention the sort of quantities you can do, or the capacity container it can happily work with.
     
  2. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    The first thing you do, the first thing everyone does.... an egg.

    62.8c for 60 minutes...

    As you go larger in containers it is a good idea to:
    Pre-heat your water
    let your meat come to room temp
    use an insulated container (I have a 20 litre esky)
     
  3. cuahtemoc

    cuahtemoc Member

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    You're welcome. This http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/12/sous-vide-circulator-review-sansaire-nomiku-anova.html says maximum reccomended capacity for the 800w Bluetooth anova is 22l, so I'd assume 25-ish for the Wifi, but you could probably smash that if the container was insulated (less heat loss). I normally have a loosely fitting lid covering the polycarb tub because otherwise the evaporation makes it difficult to maintain high termperatures (75+).

    Try and find a restaurant supply shop for your polycarb tub. I think mine is a Polycarbonate 2/1 200mm depth but unless you're cooking for a family and friends all the time it's total overkill. Most people could get away with a 1/1 or 1/2 easily. My mammoth one was about $35 with a lid which was a lot better than online.

    Edit: This is the one I've got: http://www.ecotel.asia/product/polycarbonate-21-gn-200mm
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2016
  4. damo2002

    damo2002 Member

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    Well, if you insist that everyone does it... :Pirate:

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    I did preheat the water a little because I wasn't sure how long it'd take to get there - very quick from the 30ish degrees I heated from. I probably wouldn't have thought of bringing meat to room temp for larger quantities, I can see how it would easily drop the water temperature.

    There's a few places around local to me with those sort of supplies, so I'll suss them out. Would a container + matching lid with a hole for the Anova to stick out of work well you think?
     
  5. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    I bought a 15L container from Spotlight for $7 on special, and used a heat gun/stanley knife to cut a semi circle in the edge of the lid. Works perfect. Oh and make sure you put something under the waterbath if you're sitting it on a benchtop like a cutting board and a tea-towell - the first long cook I did I ended up with white heat marks on the benchtop.
     
  6. cuahtemoc

    cuahtemoc Member

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    Absolutely. Apparently a hole saw works amazingly to get a perfect cut, I used scissors to cut the worlds most dog eared rectangle out of the edge of my lid but it still works fine. The lid doesn't need to fit super tightly either, I think I grabbed a slightly warped lid when I got mine so it doesn't sit tight but it still does the job just fine.

    Egg looks great, congrats :)
     
  7. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    That egg looks like it came up spot on.
    How good are they? and the whites never feel as slimy as they look...

    If you want to tidy up the hole you put into the lid, or make it look a little more finished..
    Glue one of these suckers into it, perfect fit.
     
  8. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Giving pork char siu on the weekend,

    I marinated the meat a couple of weeks ago and ended up having to freeze it. I’m just using chopped up pork chops.
    It’s been in the freezer for a while now and I’ve decided I’m going to sous vide it. Ended up dropping it into a vac bag.

    Found a recipe that uses fairly thick cut pork chops and calls for 60 degrees for 8 hours. These are relatively thin so I’m thinking just 4 hours.

    Once cooked I’ll reduce the sauce and char the meat over some heat beads. Add some sauce at the end and serve on some rice.

    4 hours and 60 degrees sound okay? They’re relatively thin so the charring process at the end will probably cook them more anyway.

    ~~

    Didn't get any pics. Ended up doing about 5 hours at 60. Damn nice, will do it again for sure.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2016
  9. yanman

    yanman Member

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  10. scon

    scon Member

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    Well my Joule shipped today. Hope to be able to contribute to this thread more.
     
  11. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    That I am looking forward to... I know you'll come up with some interesting stuff.

    Keen to get some insights into the Joule too ..
     
  12. avexdevil

    avexdevil Member

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    hey guys entering the sou vide foray myself. not a cook myself, i've tried and failed several times, but precision and science is where i'm at.

    ordered an anova and intending to stock up on a few things in preparation:
    1. zip loc bags
    2. proper vacuum seal bags from aldi for longer cooks
    3. will probably use a small 3-5L eski for the container
    4. cling wrap to help with maintaining temp
    6. lotsa bulldog clips to hold bags to side of container
    5. blow torch to sear, any recommendations?

    I would prefer to avoid the kitchen altogether if I could, i.e. not having to panfry and use crockery lol. Happy to marinade meats before.
    Anything else I should consider getting?
     
  13. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    What is your budget for the torch and what’s kind of convenience level are you looking at?

    MAPP torches from Bunnings are high heat and pretty good, approx 80 dollars. Pencil shaped flame doesn’t get amazing coverage but works well.

    You can look at getting the Searzall attachment on a torch, I think they’re around 80 dollars as well (?) but spread the heat, clean the flame up so no unburnt fuel taste etc.

    Alternatively you can get a mini gas cooker, handy for camping or power outages, and they’re generally around 20-30 dollars. And a solid cast iron pan. Cast iron and the gas cooker you could do outside because it’d create a bucketload of smoke.

    Alternative #2. A pile of heatbeads, either in a chimney starter (approx. 30 dollars) + the heat beads themselves. They get very hot and do a lot of surface area. Con is though that they take 15 minutes or so to get up to temperature and lit. If you have a weber or a bbq that requires fuel this helps you out in both areas though.

    If it were me, and money wasn’t an issue. I’d probably get the torch and the searzall.
    I’m currently using the heatbead/chimney starter combo with okay results.

    Apart from that everything else you have looks fine.
    I’d get pretty sick of using cling film over the esky for heat/evap reasons. I’d nearly get lazy and just cut a hole that fits the anova into the lid.
     
  14. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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  15. scon

    scon Member

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    Those lamb Shanks look great! My Joule arrived today, I'll put up a few impressions shortly.

    avexdevil - will bulldog clips attach to the side of an esky? Wouldn't it be too wide? Also, will the anova? I'm not sure what its clip is like.

    Also there's a good video on best ways to sear after cooking here:


     
  16. avexdevil

    avexdevil Member

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    Appreciate the quick response fellas. Being the quintessential single male with no cooking aptitude or inclination to clean up too much after a meal, I would likely go for the more expensive option and reap the benefits later.

    I’ve narrowed it down to a couple of propane torches ranging from $50-$90 on Bunnings, but the searzall attachment isn’t cheap at all, search came up with a couple shipped from the US for $150. Is there a local distributor?

    I have an assorted range of bulldog clips here in my workplace, might just give them all a go, or purchase one of those kitchen plastic tubs from aldi/kitchenwarehouse if the eski walls are too thick.

    Also I’ve seen that video, seems like the chimney is the way to go, perhaps I’ll sort a DIY rig up for gatherings, but certainly the torch option for the daily 2-3 pieces of steak.
     
  17. scon

    scon Member

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    Alright so I received my Joule - took a few pics... cooked an egg. So far so good.


    Outer Packaging
    [​IMG]

    Inner Packaging
    [​IMG]
    You can use it in a small container. This is probably only in about 1L of water.
    [​IMG]
    And this is a 75C egg cooked for 15 minutes. Came out pretty much perfect!
    [​IMG]

    So my initial thoughts are that I absolutely love the size - it's about the size of stab mixer I guess, even a little bit thinner and shorter, great, easy to fit into a drawer. It also can stand up on its own without having to be clipped on to anything, love that as well. Being able to cook in small vessel is awesome too. Not 100% on having to use an app but the app is decent, has a full manual mode which of course is good - haven't used any of the recipes yet. The app is a little overly friendly - same sort of personality as the Chefsteps website I guess which is personal preference but I find it a little grating. Oh and it can connect via both wifi or bluetooth.

    Keen to give it a bit more of a test. Might do salmon tonight and something like brisket/shortribs/pork belly or even a steak sometime later in the week.
     
  18. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Didn't you give them anything to eat in the 48 hours the lamb was cooking? :lol: They look like ravenous beasties. :lol:
     
  19. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    I swear it is the cherry popper for everyone who enters the realm of sous vide... and with good reason, so easy and such an eye opener to what is possible with this as a cooking process.

    That looks a little bit like "mummies bedside table toy" :lol:

    Now that is a feature I am liking already.... Excellent if you are only knocking over a few eggs or a piece of salmon for one etc..


    They do like their lamb... actually.. food in general. The thought of those two during their teenage years is terrifying, they will probably send me broke.

    The younger one (blonde) is really scary... you give him something like a shank, a chicken leg etc and it comes back totally clean... no meat, no skin, no cartridge, no gristle of any kind.. if he can chew it off the bone it goes down the gullet.

    I should mention a downside to cooking the lamb like that... the smell when you crack open the bags was horrendous, it was really unpleasant right up until it was seared off in a hot skillet with some butter to encourage a crust..
    This horrible, overly gamey, meaty smell... tasted freaking awesome though and soooooo tender.
     
  20. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Get them trained up in cooking and send them to the markets... :lol:
     

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