Experiments with sous-vide cooking

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Amfibius, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Bone in cutlets. Thick cut if I can get them. Simple salt brine and then a tiny bit of butter and thyme/garlic.
     
  2. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Well I’m back on the bandwagon.


    My first two attempts with steak and sous vide left a lot to be desired. It was cooked perfectly, it was tender, the char on the outside was adequate. But really it was lacking something that I couldn’t put my finger on.


    Mrs was away for the night so I decided I’d treat myself to a good steak. I asked a mate of mine if he was keen as well so I had a bit more of a reason to cook.


    2 x 500g black angus rib fillets were picked.

    Onion Powder/Garlic Powder, Salt and Pepper. No butter or oil added.

    57 degrees chosen as the temp.

    1 and a half hours cook time.

    Seared over natural lump which was so damn hot the stainless grates on my grill were glowing red.

    Served with onion rings and a basic salad. Diane sauce that my mate brought over and a glass of red.


    Easily the best steak I’ve had in a long time.


    https://imgur.com/a/pmHqn
     
  3. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    You know the only thing that can actually penetrate the meat is salt? Everything else you might as well leave till you pull it out of the bag...
    (especially raw garlic... that stuff is actually dangerous in a SV bag due to botulism risk)

    You got a good looking steak happening there though, nice crust and looks like it stayed super juicy...
    I love a sear that is so hot the metal glows, branding iron sear... seen some good set-up with a small grill over a charcoal chimney.
     
  4. vellanet

    vellanet Member

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    I can never get my cast iron pan hot enough on my stove, Can anyone suggest a burner that I could say hook up to my bbq propane tank to give me enough heat to get my pan hot enough in a few mins.
     
  5. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    The best heat source is charcoal... but it takes a while to get going.
    You could look at some of the big wok burners on FleaBay or at BBQs Galore etc. They will smash your gas bottle down pretty hard but.

    If I am only doing one or two I place a small cast iron grill (I think it is an old drain grille) over a charcoal chimney... it is glowing after about 15 mins.
     
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  6. neRok

    neRok Member

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    Must be a pretty poor stove then. My stove gets mine so hot, you cant hold it for more than a moment even when using an oven-mit and a tea-towel for protection. Perhaps you could pre-heat the pan in the oven, then use it on the stove, and hopefully it will have enough heat in it.

    You could get one of these: https://forums.overclockers.com.au/...k-maybe-a-flamethrower.1136582/#post-16233288 They are so intense though (I purchased and used one since that thread), and that means you can't use indoors, which gets a bit annoying going outside to cook things all the time. I would use it pretty much on the floor, and it would heat up my patio roof :lol:
     
  7. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Yeah, it's a bit like BBQ rubs when smoking though. None of that goes in, just gives you a nice crust on the outside.
    Not using raw garlic though, powder all the way. I'll definitely do it again I think it made a big difference.
     
  8. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    Steak is a waste of time in SV in my opinion. Secondary cuts, fish and poultry are much better. And SV mash potatoes are amazing!! No boiling the flavour out in water!
     
  9. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Absolutely agreed. Until last night, and I've changed my mind.

    I'm not sold on chicken yet though. I'm yet to find the texture that works for me there.
     
  10. 303-Acid

    303-Acid Member

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    I got an anova last december and love it. Steaks are great! I tried a brisket but had the zip lock bags fail due to the long cook time. So I've since got a vacuum sealer. Brisket was still OK.

    I also gave creme brulee a go and they turned out amazing! So smooth!
     
  11. splbound

    splbound Member

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    Yes I would agree if I was not doing bulk e.g. a couple of steaks.
    I actually like the different textures of doneness on something like a T-bone\Porterhouse\Ribeye and fat rendering done on the good old BBQ or hot skillet.
    Same goes for Roast pork belly, better done in a hot then slow oven. The fat renders so much better.

    When I have a very large cut or something special I don't want to chance screwing it up I head for SV.

    Sous Vide comes on its own when you have bulk to do and/or want to ensure everything is consistent.

    BBQ party, 20+ SV steaks all done exactly the same.. too easy.
    Camping and picnics, no problem. SV and chill the night before. Then at the site just quickly finish on the BBQ.
    Less time looking after stuff more time for fun.

    My last SV experiment was with confit duck legs, results fantastic without having to juggle a pot of duck\goose fat.
    Now have a supply in the freezer post SV vac sealed, ready for rillette or just straight pan fried.

    SVduck1.jpg

    SVduck2.jpg
     
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  12. bobfranklin

    bobfranklin Member

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    I'm the same, I've tried a bunch of different temps and times and it's always got that weird texture.
     
  13. darksilencer

    darksilencer Member

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    I'm still using zip loc bags, can anyone recommend a vac sealer and if they are worth the additional cost?

    Cheers
     
  14. 303-Acid

    303-Acid Member

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  15. splbound

    splbound Member

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    I would recommend one as well if you are doing a lot of long cooks. Last thing you want is a breach.
    Very useful as well when you want to chill and store in the freezer after the SV process to finish off later.

    The sealer is also useful for storing and transporting food and enables me to store a lot more in my freezer. It also helps prevent meat from getting freezer burn.

    Fantastic for meal portioning as well. I batch cook casseroles and portion them for freezing and eating later in the week.

    Just find a source for good sturdy vac seal bags and you are set, I go for the rolls.

    Would love a chamber sealer but no space for it.
     
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  16. Oosh

    Oosh Member

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    I got an ALDI one when it cropped up and have been happy.
     
  17. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Have been toying with the idea of doing a fake porchetta for a while. There's a link on foodwishes which gave me the inspiration.
    http://foodwishes.blogspot.com.au/2016/12/new-years-baby-porchetta-heres-to-being.html

    Didn't have any Fennel seeds which was a bit of a disappointment. And I also upped the temp to 67 degrees. I would have went rarer but I knew the Mrs would have murdered me if her dinner came out slightly pink - was still very tender and delicious though. Ended up being about a 3 hour cook time as we went out and didn't get home until late. Finished in a 240 degree oven for about 10-15 minutes to crisp up the bacon.

    [​IMG]

    Album
    https://imgur.com/a/3GKWt
     

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