Experiments with sous-vide cooking

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Amfibius, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    yeah i thought of that, but was hoping to have some bones/wings in there (I like picking at the bones :lol:)
     
  2. caspian

    caspian Member

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    what is everyone using for a separator rack in a large stockpot? I like the look of the Lipavi racks but damn nature, you expensive.
     
  3. caspian

    caspian Member

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    OK, so after the first night's adventures, floating vegetables are a PITA.

    I was going to get my machinist mate to turn me up some dead weight bars out of 316 stainless, but ended up buying some silicone covered magnets via Amazon instead.

    carrots needed longer, but sous vide broccolini was very nice, lovely intense flavour without water washing everything away.
     
  4. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    Time and temp?

    As for floatage.. I normally just throw a cup or plate on top. Sometime I clip a piece of cutlery to the bottom of the bag.

    I do tend to be careful with what metals I put in the bath though... made the mistake of putting a cooling rack in the esky during a loong (50 hour) cook once.. corrosion /rust issues. Stained my Anova.. almost like electrolysis
     
  5. caspian

    caspian Member

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    the weights would go inside the bag, but I see your point. I found a number of posts around the net about just putting a butter knife in the bag but I'd rather something with less edges.

    I had carrots in at 85°C so the broccolini went in at the same temp for 30 mins. next time I'll try a little less and try and get some bite back into the stems, but the flavour was very fragrant with just a little olive oil and salt.
     
  6. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    I have read a few reports that even good quality stainless steel had imparted a flavour into the bag contents.. I have my doubts but I wouldn't risk a $40 steak on it for instance. Maybe seal the metal weight into one end of a bag separated from the food ?

    I often joke that that I use old lead sinkers... apart from the involuntary twitching and the occasional bouts of blindness I haven't notice any adverse affects.
     
  7. caspian

    caspian Member

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    :lol: I get much the same thing with my home brew...

    I did find a range of silicone covered weights, but only from US sellers, and the shipping would make baby Jesus cry. https://www.amazon.com.au/SO-VIDA-W...d=1533013934&sr=8-3&keywords=sous+vide+weight

    ended up with these, if they're not heavy enough on their own or the vessel is not ferromagnetic, whack another one on the outside too. https://www.amazon.com.au/Sous-Vide...d=1533014028&sr=8-1&keywords=sous+vide+magnet

    hopefully they will be here for some experiments next weekend.
     
  8. scon

    scon Member

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  9. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    http://www.themeatcase.com/blog/equilibrium-brine-sous-vide-and-the-worlds-best-roast-beef

    Who here has done ‘roast beef’ lunch meat. I just bought a cheap topside roast and plan on following this guide. Except for the bone marrow/tallow/onions etc in the bag. And I’ll let it cool completely before blasting it over some coals.

    Anybody done something similar with pork, roast pork lunch meat, or chicken breasts? I’ve got a friend from works controller for another week and I’m trying to do as much as I can before I revert back to my old method of the slow cooker and a temp controller.
     
  10. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    I've done sous vide corned beef. Didn't even bother searing it afterward. Came out perfect like lunch meat.
     
  11. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Wasn't too salty? Did you soak in water prior?

    I'm going to do a pastrami in the smoking thread another day. But the last time I cooked a corned meat without the buffer of a tonne of water/vinegar/sugar it ended up way too salty for my tastes.
     
  12. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    I'd have to look back at some posts, but it definitely wasn't dry or salty. It looked dry from the outside, bit after slicing was perfect
     
  13. pugsley

    pugsley Member

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    So it's Christmas pudding time. And i'm thinking i could do a sous vide water bath to cook it? Or would that just be suitable for reheating it on the day?
     
  14. Oosh

    Oosh Member

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    To what end? I'm not sure how it'd benefit from the technique like a steak does.
     
  15. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    I was curious so I had a quick google about it. First link said 71 degrees as overcooking starts to take away some of the subtle flavours. That being said I think you could stick with traditional steaming and just drop a probe in the centre and wait for it to hit target.

    I got told this morning that I'm doing xmas day lunch for 20+ people. So I'm going to start prep pretty soon.
    But I'm also thinking I'll precook a lot of my veges sous-vide and then do a quick smashing into an oven to crisp up the edges. May even reheat a couple of cooked chooks in bags as well for convenience.
     
  16. scon

    scon Member

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    Porchetta is a great one to do for Christmas - great for sous vide too.
     
  17. Oosh

    Oosh Member

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    In past years I've sous vide a turkey roll, deep fried it to crisp the skin one year, oven fried seperately and served as skin 'chips' the other which was far easier.
    Vegetables often have to cooked at pretty high-temp, so I'd stick with boil/steam first, and finish of with a high-heat roast.
     
  18. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    36 hour pork belly on @62c.

    Coated in cinnamon, salt, apple and red onion (which i'll use to make an apple sauce on saturday).

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Revenge

    Revenge Member

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    How did that work out?

    I would have thought 62c would be too low to do much with the onions / apples?
     
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  20. hsvguy

    hsvguy Member

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    It was great, onions and apples were soft but not disintegrating.
     

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