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Extinct frog hops back into the gene pool

Discussion in 'Science' started by luxtin, Mar 16, 2013.

  1. luxtin

    luxtin Member

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    I thought this was pretty awesome. Especially at the forecast rate of extinction expected.



    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/a...e-gene-pool-20130315-2g68x.html#ixzz2NenmL8ja
     
  2. lithos

    lithos Member

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    And then...

    [​IMG]
     
  3. gcflora

    gcflora Member

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    It's exciting and interesting progress for sure. The only problem I can think of is that they (apparently) only have one genome :( For a species such as this to recover they'd need to clone lots of different frogs so that sexual reproduction could work properly. Nevertheless it's an exciting development!
     
  4. CAPT-Irrelevant

    CAPT-Irrelevant Member

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    Apparently the idea of bringing back dinosaurs has been debunked because it's reported fossilised DNA becomes unusable after 1 million years.

    At least that's the word going around...
     
  5. Phido

    Phido Member

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    But you can switch genes on and off in say a chicken and turn it into the shared ancestor of birds and dinosaurs.

    But I think we can definitely bring back frogs and birds that were recently extinct. I think there is a good chance that you could bring back a mammoth in the next 50 years.

    T-rex is still highly unlikely, however, never say never. Its certainly a lot harder than we through when Jurassic park was first written. We can't do it that way for sure.
     
  6. ddk

    ddk (Banned or Deleted)

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  7. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

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    Clever girl!
     
  8. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    For what reason did they become extinct in the first place?
     
  9. ddk

    ddk (Banned or Deleted)

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    Frogs absorb water and oxygen through their skin. Last I read scientists thought that they were suffering because of all the toxins we release into the environment. Plus there's some sort of fungal infection wiping them out as well.
     
  10. ke70

    ke70 Member

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    They should clone the mammoth using elephants.
     
  11. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    maybe they tasted good

    mmmm.... field chicken
     
  12. CAPT-Irrelevant

    CAPT-Irrelevant Member

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  13. Phido

    Phido Member

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    Neolithic Park! Bringing a mammoth back is certainly possible and I am 90% sure it will happen in our lifetime.

    PS they are re-releasing Jurassic Park in 3D in cinemas soon!
     
  14. DarkStyle

    DarkStyle Member

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    A more comprehensive article on this was published on National Geographic, which states that scientists weren't sure why this species became extinct but suspect it was related to lethal chytrid fungus.

    SMH is merely reprinting watered down shit from more reputable sources. Additionally, the national geographic article states that:
    .

    Not even close to repopulating this species. Considering the amount of genetic material that would have been stored, its unlikely that this frog species would be able to reproduce without the available genetic material breeding huge amounts of recessive traits (which in turn would lead to compromised immunological responses, making them more, not less susceptible to diseases).

    If genuinely interested in providing an informed, well structured post, it pays to ensure the integrity of the material being posted. Don't inflate your post counts with useless dribble and strive to increase the quality not quantity of information available on the forums.
     

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