Falcon 9 / Dragon

Discussion in 'Science' started by MoorKhan, Dec 8, 2010.

  1. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Elon on twitter this morning:

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/985654333860601856

    So presumably he's talking about using a ballute for hypersonic reentry, which is something a few researchers at UQ were looking into on our shock tunnels back in my engineering-student days. Interesting. I wonder how they're thinking they'll slow down once they're low-supersonic
     
  2. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Okay now I'm even more perplexed about orbital atk's newly-christened "OmegA", thanks to whichever marketing weenie thought that name was a good idea. They've chosen the RL-10c for the upper stage... which even ULA are trying to move away from in vulcan, cause it costs too damned much. As spacex have demonstrated, being able to 3d-print large swathes of your smaller engines makes a huge difference in terms of cost and performance, and that's going to be even more true for an expander-cycle engine like that, because of the enourmous cost involved in brazing all those LH2 channels, instead of just 3d-printing them in place...

    So they've got the most expensive kind of first stage, the most expensive kind of second stage, and now they're adding a less than cheap upper stage engine to all of that... and reusing nothing. Competing against not one but *three* competitors all of whom at the very least have *plans* to reuse something (ala the plan to bring the first-stage engines from vulcan back down)
     
  3. Sphinx2000

    Sphinx2000 Member

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    SpaceX just successfully launched NASA’s new Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) deployed into a highly elliptical orbit, plus performs the 24th successful Falcon 9 first stage landing down range on the sea barge “Of Course I Still Love You”

     
  4. RnR

    RnR Member

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    Reports are out that the Russians have given up competing with SpaceX.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/201...ndered-to-spacex-in-the-global-launch-market/
     
  5. Sphinx2000

    Sphinx2000 Member

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    The reduction in price from Spacex has been amazing. According to NASA the space shuttle was ~$450 million USD per launch, or $16,364 USD per kg to LEO.
    The Falcon 9 is now $62 million USD, or $2,719 USD per kg to LEO. The Falcon Heavy is $2,351 USD per kg when expendable or $1,411 USD when reused.

    The BFR is supposed to have 2.5x the payload for 8% of the cost so $46 USD per kilogram. Even fully expendable it's $2,233 USD per kg. That's better than space elevator money..
     
  6. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    As designed, the space shuttle was a great idea
    In practice, it was incredibly bad.

    @ $46/kg, I can get myself to space for $5K... Kickstarter anyone?
     
  7. Sphinx2000

    Sphinx2000 Member

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    Once the BFR achieves it's design plan, a new space station would be easier to build than a sea-lab.
    Setup production facilities / transfer station in LEO, access to space exploration and colonisation will be easy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
  8. Jacom

    Jacom Member

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    That's what I was thinking. With the cost per kg dropping so low, expand the current space station to be *much* bigger (can the liquid oxygen be stored indefinately in tanks up there? I know down here the normal outside temperature makes it boil off).

    Use the new launch capablities to make a moon base (where they can test vacuumn engiones on a solid surface and it's not *too* bad if it blows up (can't blow the moon out of orbit).

    Can use a moon base to trial out new building methods for outside earth (and for living off earth on other rocky bodies). I think there's water ice already up there and they might be able to do some moon mining for construction (much simpler than hauling it out of earths gravity well).

    Then you could even have a simple shuttle/ship that *only* goes back and forth from the moon to the station. Use falcon 9's (or BFR's) to go back and forth to the station from Earth with cargo, people and fuel. -> think a Shell Petrol tuck re-filling a petrol station for other cars.

    Is that a crazy idea?
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
  9. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    It still boils off, jacom, but it's significantly easier to keep, and also significantly easier to chill the boil-off back down. Or alternatively you could go with ULA's plan, and use the boiloff to run a lightweight generator and manouvering thrusters (they never released details on on how they were planning on doing the latter though)

    Next falcon launch is significant, in so far as it's the test flight of block 5. Tentatively scheduled for the 4th of may
     
  10. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    I havent watched it yet, but Gwynne Shotwell's done a TED interview, which should be interesting...
     
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  11. RnR

    RnR Member

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    Block 5 coming up... the last big revision to Falcon 9...

    https://arstechnica.com/science/201...ch-marks-the-end-of-the-beginning-for-spacex/
     
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  12. Quadbox

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    The new black interstage looks like it might be carbonfibre, I wonder if they're using it as a testbed for manufacturing techniques for BFR's tanks... (photo at www.spacenews.com for example, at risk of hotlinking)
     
  13. RnR

    RnR Member

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  14. Sphinx2000

    Sphinx2000 Member

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    Congrats to SpaceX and the Block 5 team for a successful launch, delivery & first stage recovery. Making access to space cheaper than ever for many nations.
     
  15. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    10 minutes, get it live :)
     
  16. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Lol, just as soon as I was starting to believe they were *actually going to make it* for a december manned launch, it turns out that block 5 launch last week doesnt count as one of the seven nasa require...

    EDIT - It could still happen by my count, but only if *every single launch* from the unmanned test onwards is of the new configuration, and no schedule slips happen, which, lets face it, isnt likely. So the launches that would have to have the new tanks would be SPX-DM01 (the unmanned test of dragon2), SAOCOM 1A, Spaceflight SSO-A, Iridium NEXT 66-75 (which incidentally is the last iridium next launch), the first GPS III launch for the airforce, RADARSAT constellation and then CRS-16, giving seven launches. It seems very unlikely the manned launch wont slip a couple of months to february or so
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2018 at 4:15 PM
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