Farm Water Cooling (Water tank used as res).

Discussion in 'Extreme and Water Cooling' started by Madengineer, Jul 14, 2015.

  1. Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Hey guys,

    I'm a little bored sitting at my folks place. It's freezing outside, and we currently have a corrugated water tank that is overflowing and it's not being used.

    We also have an old spare pump, and I've got an old prescott sitting around.

    So I thought, why not hook it up to the tank with 5,000 litres of water.

    How well would that work if I set it up with a block and used a household pump to pump the water through?

    Would that move the water too quick for heat transference?

    I'm only thinking about it cause I'm bored, and I wanna see how high I can clock it (and how many volts). haha

    Currently, the tank is sitting at -3 overnight and gets to about 5-8 degrees during the day (with the ambient temp sitting at about 7 degrees usually).

    The tank has an inlet/outlet. Outlet is an inch, inlet is 1/2 inch originally designed as a gravity fed tank.

    Could I get away with not using a pump?

    Could it move enough water without requiring a pump?

    What is the largest inlet/outlet you can get on a CPU block?

    I'm also considering boring a hole through a massive block of steel and threading an inlet/outlet so that I could have water pass straight through. But again, was concerned with the heat transference.

    I've got practically everything except a block. Got plenty of piping etc.

    I wouldn't need a radiator, as it'd feed straight from the tank then straight back in (pulling from the bottom expelling at the top).

    Hosing would be less than 2 metres one way.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. desertstalker

    desertstalker Member

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    You need a pump, water will not circulate otherwise (except by convection, way too slow).

    Water flow rate will not impact cooling, but a large high pressure pump may well blow up blocks etc.

    Pretty sure this has been done before, try google for how they went.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Yeah, that's why I was just thinking of using a solid piece of steel thats been drilled and threaded.

    So you think gravity feed will be too slow?

    Just took a look at PCCG and they have cheap enough pumps for $30 a piece. Which I'm OK with.

    But yeah, I've got a few different clumps of steel (ranging from 10mmX10mm to 50mmX50mm.

    Chuck a 1/2 or 1inch hole through that so the water can pass through.

    EDIT: Right, so I just did a bit of reading about the gravity feed, and I understand why it wouldn't work now. While it'd have enough pressure to come down, it's not going to have enough pressure to rise up the remaining 2 metre tube.

    So yeah, I'll need to use/get a pump to return the water.


    EDIT 2: Would it be more effective to a right angle in the steel block? So inlets at the top and outlet at the side?

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  4. Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

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    You don't need a pump if you set it up as a total loss system. Flow in one side and out the other onto the garden. Not a very enviro-friendly option, but it you're just doing an experiment it would work fine. How long would it take to drain 5000L through a thin hose? :)
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Couple of hours.

    Problem is draining that water from the area (ground) considering how wet (RE snow) it's been here recently.

    We don't want/need water sitting around on the ground. lol

    But, it may give me the motivation to empty that tank into one of the other tanks.

    How well though will any (either cheap or decent) PC water pump cope with that amount of water? Even for only a couple of hours?

    Talking a total of 4-5 metres worth of hose, with a diameter of at least 1/2 inch.

    According to Google, with 40psi (Hose supply pressure) and a 1/4 inch 40ft hose, it'd push 1.4lts a second.

    That is a lot of water per second. With a 100ft hose, that'd be reduced to about 300mls per second.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  6. EotL-STALKER

    EotL-STALKER Member

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    That wouldn't take long to empty. It sounds a lot but it isn't really.
    You could gravity feed from the tank at the bottom 50,000l is a lot of weight... Enough to push it through a 2m hose at force and a pump to push it back up to dump it back in at the top of the tank (you would also have the momentum of the down-force to help the pumps flow back up)...

    Be careful if it leaks but!!! you don't want to fill your house with water if it leaks...
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  7. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Lol. Won't be in the house. It'll be in the mancave. :Paranoid:

    But nah, using that tank isn't an option. The bigger tanks are hooked up to an intricate system supplying water to stock/the house. Emptying into them is easy. Making a loop using them is new Ron impossible.

    Tomorrow I'm going to test how much water per second would be required to pass through. So I'm going to run 4 meters of hose going down then back up into the tank. If it reaches 200ml per second, that's enough (according to google/whirlpool).

    From what I read, if I use the 1 inch to begin with, then reduce to 1/2 inch before the block, it'll have the pressure of the change, as well as the gravity feed, to push it back up.
     
  8. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    you will also need a filter otherwise your block will clog

    ghetto cooling requires a ghetto 240V pond pump placed outside where the noise isn't a problem - you will have a fair bit of head height for the return hose
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    I didn't even think of a pond pump!

    Not concerned with a filter. The water is filtered through the tank. And it won't be kept on very long. I literally only want to see how high I can increase the volts and see what the clock will end on.

    I've got a 775 Prescott ready. Also got an older p3 system to play with if I want. Haha.

    But man. I'll take a look at the pond pump option, cause that'd help for testing.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    So, today I tested the water flow. Tank is absolutely full. Through 5 metres of hosing, going down then up, through a 1/4 inch garden hose, I managed to get about 200ml per second through it. So I'm thinking that'll be enough.

    The water was sitting at a lovely - 2.4 degrees this morning in the tank (in comparison I also did the well, and it was reading at - 7ish at 30 feet below ground level. Lol

    This is going to be fun!
     
  11. EotL-STALKER

    EotL-STALKER Member

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    Was that reading through a waterblock inline ?
     
  12. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    I had an idea for a ghetto block.

    [​IMG]

    Just drill 3 Holes most of the way through a block of Metal, Tap all 3 and put a bolt into one of them. Almost 3 times more travel so to speak.

    I'm sure you could think up even more complex options using the same idea.
     
  13. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    that won't cool effectively

    you want a good combination of surface area and flow restriction

    EDIT: which for a ghetto block means finding an old copper CPU heatsink and sealing the sides with your preferred choice of PVC square tubing and silicone goop
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2015
  14. Paulie_AU

    Paulie_AU Member

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    I have come late to this discussion so I will add that a tap will control flow from your pump. If outlet of pipe is back into the tank then the depth of water above the pc will be static pressure and all other pressure will be a function of flow and resistance.

    If you have too big a pump that you do not want to dead head then use a tee and another tap and bleed most of the flow straight to the tank.

    It you can be bothered I would drill across the lump of steel a heap of times and then down from the face into opposite quadrants. I dont know how well it would remove heat though but aluminum or copper would be better. If you have thinner steel welding or brazing a little box would be a better option. Then add some little directing ridges etc to create turbulent flow and see how it goes.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    Nope. But considering my idea of a water block is only going to have a hunk of metal with a straight through hole (as in it'll just be like another piece of hose) it won't matter.
     
  16. Shepete

    Shepete Member

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    You do realise that water turns to ice at 0Degs C, don't you?:confused:
     
  17. HeXa

    HeXa Member

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    is Cooma

    thermodynamics is too scared to cross the town limits :p
     
  18. OP
    OP
    Madengineer

    Madengineer Member

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    There probably was ice in there, but given how much water there was. I know the hose was frozen when I first tried this morning, so had to take it off and replace it. But yeah, I dunno. I may have to use a different thermometer. Also I may have been reading the wrong guages. It's hard whe there's one for each tank and outside temp.

    And no, not cooma. Think colder.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2015
  19. havabeer

    havabeer Member

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    isn't that dependent on flow and pressure?
     
  20. Shepete

    Shepete Member

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    Possibly, water purity plays a part as well.
    I am not aware of any appreciable flow or pressure in either a water tank or a well!
     

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