Favourite Cookbooks

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by omghi, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. omghi

    omghi Member

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    Dinner time around my table has become a bit mundane and repetitive. I'm frustrated with internet recipe sites because they so often seem to be untested or just strange, so I want to invest in some good cookbooks for inspiration.

    My skill level probably lies somewhere in the middle. I'm certainly not looking for those four ingredients cook books but because I cook 6 or 7 nights a week, I'm also not really looking for The Fat Duck style recipes either but feel free to share those too if you love them (maybe with a disclaimer).

    I'd love any recommendations for your favourite cookbooks or books that you find yourself returning to again and again.

    A few friends have recommended Jamie's 30 minute meals but I'm not sure if I buy the Jamie hype.
     
  2. pugsley

    pugsley Member

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    Allow up to an hour for some of Jamies 30min meals. Sure 30min may be the cooking time he can do it in but he had a bunch of assistants making sure everything was ready and waiting for him. Plus he doesnt have to do any of the cleaning so he uses everything in the kitchen :p
    But there are some solid recipes in there.

    I'm not sure if i can help but I enjoy the river cottage series of books. Hugh's recipes are always flavourful. River cottage everyday is great for midweek meals.

    I also own Heston's book, Heston Blumenthal at Home. I open that book when i feel like spending a a bit of time by myself in the kitchen. He takes a look at every day meals and puts his own twist on them. Plus there is the recipe for triple cooked chips, which everyone should try, they're pretty amazing :p
     
  3. Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

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    There's one called "Small Food" which you can expand to make larger foods. :) But it's got a lot of recipes I've turned into my signature meals over the years.
     
  4. kerr34

    kerr34 Member

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    i recommend google.

    depending one what you cook there are always recipes for free on the net. i love finding ones in blogs written by people who are living in the country of the style of cooking you are going for.

    if you want to know some let me know.

    i have a couple of favourites including an anglo indian one (my fave style of indian) you will be blown away by the curries etc that they produce in comparison to other indian
     
  5. Rhinz

    Rhinz (Banned or Deleted)

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    I can add another recommendation for any of the River Cottage books, Everyday in particular.

    As also said above, Jamie's 30 Minute Meals take around an hr, sometimes a little bit more including prep time.
     
  6. looktall

    looktall Working Class Doughnut

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    rick stein's far eastern odyssey has some good recipes if you're into asian foods.
     
  7. Oppressa

    Oppressa Member

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    It's part of the Chunky Food books published my Murdoch. Fantastic collection of books.
     
  8. Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

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    Yup, I've got a couple of other ones in the series, but that Small Food one is the one I keep going back to. :) I bought it before I realised it was part of a series actually.
     
  9. Veefy

    Veefy Member

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    Is there really need for any cookbook other than this one? :lol: ;) :thumbup:
    [​IMG]
     
  10. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I bought Jamie Oliver's 30-minutes book after somebody recommended it. It does take longer for somebody new to the recipes (he says as much in the front of the book) but don't let that put you off. You can pull off really nice food (and I mean REALLY nice) that is easy. One of the things I never learnt (never really had to) was how to time a whole heap of different stuff to come out as dinner at the same time. That's what the 30-minute book does. It gives instructions for several things doing this, then that, so that you end up with different things to eat as a meal.

    I am not a big "eater" and I can't really be bothered with a lot of cookery, but I've made several things from Jamie's book and they were all really nice.

    Otherwise, I'd go with the Women's Weekly cookbook. It's got all the "normal" stuff in there. There's a reason it has been selling for 50 years (or whatever it is), it's all good stuff that people like to eat, easy to make, etc. Or, buy that Super Food Ideas. Stuff in that is easy.
     
  11. Rhinz

    Rhinz (Banned or Deleted)

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    Lol, both my wife and I had so many cakes from that book growing up! It's an institution!
     
  12. --B--

    --B-- Member

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    for internet recipes try pinterest. its great at helping you find things you like and save them for later. im addicted to it

    for recipe books i highly recommend jamie 15 min and 30 min. both are great despite it taking a little longer than he says

    im going to check out the river cottage books now because ive never heards of those

    you need to know what type of food you want to cook cuisine-wise before you can get any clearer recommendations., or else think of any celebrity chefs you like and check out their books

    ive had a flilck through adam liaws books and if you like asian food they look pretty good
     
  13. OP
    OP
    omghi

    omghi Member

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    Some great ideas coming. I'll grab one of Jamie's books next I think.

    I'll eat and cook pretty much anything. At the moment our weekly meals are home made pizza, home made pasta, stir fries, pulled pork, the occasional steak and veg and pot roasts when it is cooler.

    The problem is that I have a few dishes that I know well and so don't use a recipe for and cook all the time. They aren't bad, just getting a bit boring. We are not huge meat eaters either but I'm much more likely to cook meat when I'm following a recipe.

    I do have one of Adam Liaws books that I should pull out and cook from. I found it difficult to find a lot of the ingredients before but I live near a great market now so it should be easier.
     
  14. mopiko

    mopiko Member

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    Any by Yottam Ottenlenghi. Plenty and his self titled one are both quite interesting and inspiring even if you don't follow his recipes to the full.

    Second the River Cottage books, and I'm a fan or Jamie's earlier works. I'm a huge fan of Jamie. While his 15/30 minute books probably take longer than advertised, I think they're good for inspiration, ideas for short cuts and the like. Which more or less the way I cook anyway rather than strictly following a recipe.

    There's also Stephanie Alexander's Cooks Companion which is a great book
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2013
  15. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I can recommend the meatball sandwich with the coleslaw, and the swedish fish cakes....

    There are some good recipes on OCAU. Thingummy's curry was very good and thingummy's chilli con carne really good. I've yet to make Retard's indian but that looks pretty good, too. I've previously posted links to some recipes that I've made that I thought were good, so have a trawl through some of the cooking threads and you might find something you want to try without having to get a book first.

    (sorry for vagueness, I have trouble remembering details, it'll come back to be later if you are interested)
     
  16. Pbx_Jnr

    Pbx_Jnr Member

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    My wife has 7 of the Symply Too Good To Be True cookbooks. They have been great for her as even she admits to not being a great cook. The recipes are very easy to follow with easy to acquire ingredients. The big bonus for me is that they all list their dietary information and most of the meals are diabetic friendly, which is perfect for me being a Type 2 diabetic :)
     
  17. pugsley

    pugsley Member

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    foodgawker

    You're welcome :p
     
  18. pogue_mahone

    pogue_mahone Member

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    For something different also try googling Reverse Recipes...

    These are great, you put in the stuff you have at home and it tells you what you can make with that and how many other things you need to get to make it....

    Comes up with some pretty cool stuff with ingredients you already have.

    Other than that, my main other recipe book (if you can call it that) is Larousse Gastronomique.

    More of a food encyclopedia than a straight recipe book. But it is amazing. You want to cook a particular type of food, chicken, lamb, fish - loot it up and there is massive amounts of info about the food and different styles and options and of course recipes to try.
     
  19. tanboy

    tanboy Member

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    :thumbup: I second on these two authors. My wife and I have both "Ottenlenghi" and "Plenty". Plenty is targeted towards the vegetarians but still fantastic. Having tried about a third of the recipes, he really picks up on ingredients that might be total opposites from a western sense but blend extremely well together. Some ingredients might be difficult to come by or are named differently, as Ottenlenghi is Europe/Middle East based.

    Stephanie Alexander's Cooks Companion gives you fundamentals in cooking with ingredients you have but aren't sure what to do or combine it with. She goes beyond recipes and tries to give a background about the ingredients and her own experiences. It's like an Australian encyclopedia for home grown foods.
     
  20. ricky60

    ricky60 Member

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