First Vintage Restoration :)

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by @rt, Jan 12, 2014.

  1. @rt

    @rt Member

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    Last edited: Jan 12, 2014
  2. Jim G

    Jim G Member

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    Very impressive! Finished job looks beautiful.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    @rt

    @rt Member

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    Thanks :) That's the look I was going for this time ;)

    Still a few little things.. those bakelite knobs polished up well with wax,
    and I'm still on the hunt for what the original looks like.. might want some stain on the light areas.
     
  4. C0V3R

    C0V3R Member

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    Looks really good. How did you preserve the wood detailing?
     
  5. g@z

    g@z Member

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    That is EPIC! Really!

    Is that a keeper or you selling it off?

    Regards,
    g@z.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    @rt

    @rt Member

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    I don't think I can top this one too easily for a console g@z...
    I'll be happy to give it up when I'm no longer able to maintain it :)

    The detail on the timber, easy, the aftermarket stain/varnish job was old
    and dodgy enough to be removed with half a dozen rolls of duct tape.
    From there I have only sanded flat surfaces, sharp edges, and rounded bevels.
    The fine detail is just rubbed down with turps, and treated the same after that.

    It's really only in a period of waiting to see some originals for comparison.
    I am meeting with the right people so that is very likely to happen.
     
  7. g@z

    g@z Member

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    Got any more details on the model ? Airzone were an Aussie company and there seems to be quite a bit of info out there, although no images of that model.

    Regards,
    g@z.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    @rt

    @rt Member

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    I have service info, and company info, Just seen no pictures.
    It's not all that hard though, there will be comparable models even on eBay to look at.
    I know the chassis type is 602, and I think cabinet is 625.
    Not sure about the latter, as the same chassis went into multiple cabinets,
    and 625 is just one compatible cabinet type that I also have no images of.

    I'm happy just to keep an eye out, I'm only just getting started socially with groups.
    There are a lot of collectors out there.
     
  9. aznpsuazn

    aznpsuazn Member

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    That looks great! Sorta thing you walked past every day and still get a smile :lol:
     
  10. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    Looks fantastic apart from the blonde wood, pretty certain that's not authentic.

    Over the years I've thought of doing vintage radio restorations but more from the perspective of the cabinets. Probably a good thing I never got around to it as I'd never resist the temptation to replace the electronics with something modern.

    What happens to all these vintage AM radios when AM gets shut down?

    As for the Bakelite knobs and maybe you know this already. It would not be insanely difficult to make new ones out of Bakelite.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    @rt

    @rt Member

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    I think it's either meant to be black or dark stain.
    It's for real. On the bottom part that's where the fretwork is done.
    I think the columns in the middle might also be dark or black, but still only guessing.

    I understand the modify bug, but it depends on the unit for me I suppose.
    For this one it's even difficult to address business that needs addressing :D
    [​IMG]

    The bakelite isn't a problem, just one of those things I didn't get to:
    [​IMG]

    but I think these are (were) produced at very high pressure.
    I remember making it in high school science,
    but don't know if/how we handled the filler and surface components.
     
  12. paulvk

    paulvk Member

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    The wood would have been covered in this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shellac that is what I see in your pics it gets darker as it gets older and cracks flakes if not maitained.
     
  13. Myst

    Myst Member

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    That's super cool!
     

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