Fresh chillies from the garden

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Quan-Time, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    Many of you know (and most probably dont) i grow chilli's. Somewhere about 15 or so varieties. Every time im talking to someone about gardening, and i mention i grow chillis i get the old story which goes something like this:

    "oh, i can take hot food. I know a guy who grows HOT chillis, hotter than yours i bet.. oh ? you grow hot ones ? his will be hotter.."

    Please meet my Naga plants. They are like this for about 3 days max before they go full orange, and another few days to get red. You can leave them to ripen longer if you wish, but they are still rocket fuel. You can eat them green too.

    Naga

    Click to view full size!


    Click to view full size!


    These are Rainbow Thai chillis. They grow vertically and i have a bunch of these as they look really nice in full growing bloom. The leaves are nice and dark, and they have 3 unique colours. The heat factor isnt high, think of a nice "thai green curry". They are "hot" but nothing special. Its more ornamental than anything. Very attractive plant imo.

    Rainbow Thai

    Click to view full size!


    Heres a crop i just picked which was ripe. Few varieties. Peter peppers, Purple tiger (purple thai, etc), tabasco and a few others. No habanaros currently, they hate this cold weather. Once it warms up, they should be all go. I have some white ones im interested in seeing grow, along with red, greens and mustards (yellow).

    Anyway.. Ill probably make some sauces up with these and cook a few nice dishes. They are currently sitting in the freezer until i need them. During summer, i should (hopefully) be getting bulk chillis grow and may be able to send some seeds out at a later date.. Wait and see.

    Selection

    Click to view full size!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2017
  2. Azrael

    Azrael Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    9,009
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Yeah, the Habernaros really arnt liking this cold weather at the moment. On the other hand my Jalapenos and Birds eyes are going nutso.

    My Naga is still quite young and only fruited for the first time in March, so will be seeing what comes of that.

    Im interested in those Thai chilis you have, as ive been looking for more climbers to obscure the ugly tank in the back yard, where did you get the plant from? Or did you grow from seed?
     
  3. vec

    vec (Taking a Break)

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2002
    Messages:
    1,478
    Nice one Quan-Time.

    My habanaros have pretty much finished fruiting for this season. I've got a single plant (2 years old) which yielded about 100 units this season, they are sitting in the freezer ready to be made into my home made tabasco-ish sauce (perfect burito sauce!).

    I quite like those ornamental thai chillis you have, are they low maintenance to grow?
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    rainbow thai are not really climbers. They are more "Shrub / bush" style. They require virtually no maint, other than watering.

    I give my plants some food every so often, mostly in full fruit season. I use some pure-carp stuff. Works great.. The rainbow thais dont really need it. Sure it helps, but they dont really have huge difference like some of the others.

    All my stuff cept rainbow thai and purple tigers were from seeds. Saying that, ive got about 8 rainbow thai clones now. I gave a few away as i had WAY too many of em, and can quite easily seed some more and pass em on.

    My current ones are now dwarfs, as they sat in (and still are in) seedling trays for WAY too long. They are about 15cm tall and seem "mature" to some extent. 2 even are fruiting.
    With some care they could quite easily recover, but ive got so many of them planted, im not hugely fussed about those anymore.
    Remind me later and ill send some seeds out, else grow some more clones when i do my next planting (fathers day is best day of the year to do it).

    Ill prepare some clones / extras and we can strike a deal since your in Radelaide.
     
  5. edge

    edge Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2001
    Messages:
    367
    Location:
    NSW
    I put down 5 naga seeds 2 months ago and only got one sprouted.
    what's the rough time they take to mature sufficiently to fruit?
     
  6. pugsley

    pugsley Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    7,602
    Location:
    North of Brisvegas!
    Whens the time to plant Chili? Recently got into growing herbs and just started veggies. Keen on trying some Chili when the time is right.
     
  7. thebranded

    thebranded Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,232
    Location:
    Sydney
    the two questions i was going to are posted above!

    3 of 6 of my Nagas have sprouted.

    and i have these chillies that look like the rainbow thai's you posted too, leaves dont go as dark though, but they taste great!
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    one thing ive learnt with nagas is they can be a bit different, even per branch. A REALLY healthy one has 5 "fingers". Much like a bunch of bananas. Mine have 3, and one spot had 4. For its first batch it only had 1 or 2.

    I guess it depends on plant maturity.

    Planting,, start germinating your seeds a few weeks before fathers day, and try to have them sprout around that time so you can plant em.

    The hotter the chilli the LONGER the germination time. One of mine took over 8 weeks to actually sprout. I was sooo close to throwing it out.

    Most take 2weeks, some 3 on the outside. Either try cotton wool routine, or some of those "jiffy growing disk" things from bunnings.
    I always use 3 seeds per attempt. Sometimes i have all 3 take, but i always get one out of the 3, so its a good balance ive learnt.
     
  9. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2001
    Messages:
    13,209
    Location:
    Perth
    My dad is the same. He grow chilli plants as a hobby. There're a couple of jolokias out back too hehe. He's got such a large variety and so much of it we can't possible consume it all. They give away a lot of them. As for heat factor, well after a certain level of heat, it really doesn't matter anymore lol. We have a number of plants that are "original" species. Sometimes he find them growing in a corner from fruits that has fallen and then he replant them into pots and grow them. And the plant will grow totally unknown chilly varieties lol. :lol:
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    cross breeds are surprisingly common. Almost all the "chocolate" or brown varieties are a mongrel.

    When you grow, they self-pollinate readily, and if you have a similar strain (theres 3 mains, look em up), if they are touching leaves or within close proximity, they will cross VERY easily.
    When they do cross, they will loose heat. The hottest will go to the "softest", and the softest will stay steady, it WONT get hotter. So you can ruin whole crops if your chasing heat.
    Not a huge deal when you know about it, but it can trap many new players.
     
  11. pugsley

    pugsley Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    7,602
    Location:
    North of Brisvegas!
    Cheers for the info QT, will certainly give them a go this year.
     
  12. Dopefish

    Dopefish Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2001
    Messages:
    2,851
    Location:
    State of confusion
    I'm Curious if it's possible to grow any chilli's through winter.
    If so, what kind of seeds would I be looking at, and where can I grab some?
     
  13. OP
    OP
    Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    chillis can grow all year round. They just dont like it. They are totally intolerant to frost, and morning dew is also equally as bad.

    One day you have a healthy plant, the next its withering and all the leaves fall off.
    A well established plant will be ok in winter, just dont expect much fruiting.

    The hotter the weather, the hotter the chilli, as a guideline. But remember that will require bulk watering / food to get the best results. They can use quite a bit of water to get healthy big fruits. They can take direct sunlight without issue providing you have a good watering method.

    If you have a shaded area, they will also grow great, and it helps cut the watering requirements as the soil doesnt dry out as quick.
     
  14. Dopefish

    Dopefish Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2001
    Messages:
    2,851
    Location:
    State of confusion
  15. OP
    OP
    Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Bhut-Jolokia-Sc...emQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item45f14d8d0c

    Thats the ones im after. This dude has HEAPS of stock.

    It all depends what you want in a chilli.. I have Hungarian Wax, they are nice, reasonably hot for most people. Make nice "neutral" sauces.

    What you after ? a cooking chilli or something you can eat raw / add to dishes without making your bum bleed ?

    Weird as it sounds, go get some cheap "bunnings" chilli seeds. They are generally some sort of clone. But they are red, look like a chilli, and reasonably resistant to most environments, and still taste quite good. Tend to have more a.. err.. not sure how you would describe food, but "raw capsicum skin" flavour. Nothing really "interesting". If anything it has a stingy after taste rather than a mellow building heat.

    Hungarian wax has a mushy stingy flavour. Much like a dish with WAY too much pepper on it, a weird sort of bite. Its quite a fast "heat in mouth" chilli, where some tend to build up over a min or 2. Its all now, and dies off. Hot ones tend to build up and get worse and worse as time goes on. Those are great for cooking with. As you dont burn the hell out of your mouth but you still get quite a strong heat rating.

    Any one of the Thai chilli family would be "easy" to start growing. They are fairly hardy, have great red colour and in some cases will fruit all year. Not huge batches, but its consistant which is nice.
    Birds eye are quite common, Peri Peri (basically same thing, depending who you ask), or the common as dirt Tabasco, which would be your "bunnings / florist shop / generic seeds in a packet" deal.
     
  16. Dopefish

    Dopefish Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2001
    Messages:
    2,851
    Location:
    State of confusion
    Well what I was looking at, was just growing some chilli to put into curry dishes, or even into sauces, tacos, etc.

    I am a fan of spicy food and I love something with a good kick to it.

    Of course I want to be able to eat it without choking to death, so I don't need 'the worlds hottest chilli' but something decently hot.
     
  17. OP
    OP
    Quan-Time

    Quan-Time Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,664
    Location:
    Radelaide.
    as i said, try some thai variety. They will give you a good indication, and the heat will be plenty.
     
  18. Dopefish

    Dopefish Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2001
    Messages:
    2,851
    Location:
    State of confusion
    OK i got some generic looking ones.
    I'm gonna visit my indian friend and try and get a few other random chillis and see if he's got any other cool herbs / plants that I can grow as well.
     
  19. jamieyn

    jamieyn Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    438
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Those rainbow thai look great - wonder where I can get some in Perth?
     
  20. shawns_maggot

    shawns_maggot Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2007
    Messages:
    363
    Location:
    Mudgee - 2850
    Those Bhut Jolokia's look like the way to go :thumbup:

    I might grow some next season. They'd go well in a nice curry :lol:
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: