Furi, Global or Wusthof?

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by user5124, Jun 28, 2004.

  1. user5124

    user5124 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    741
    Out of these three, what is everyones top recommendation?
    Here's what I've heard/read/found from talking to people in shops, reading boards, etc.

    Furi: slightly cheaper than globals, better handle (?) good steel.
    Global: expensive, well reputed, good steel, good handle.
    Wusthof: Best steel, most expensive, oldschool handle design.

    I've noted that the globals have a very thin piece of metal at the base of the blade would scrape against your forefinger if you push the knife into something. Does this happen?

    Are the wusthofs worth paying $40 or more per knife?

    Does a lighter, sharper knife lead to being able to more rapidly slice vegetables?

    I'm all about speed. I'm also a total, complete and utter kitchen newbie, but I am coordinated and want to make cooking as *efficient* as possible.

    Also, do you people always buy sets, or just get paring/chef/cleaver knives individually and ignore the rest?

    You'd think knife shopping would be easier.
     
  2. Huynhie

    Huynhie Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    Sydney
    It appears that you have decided on either one of the three brands listed. All of those guys are good and should last you a lifetime. Ultimately the best way to decide is to go to a shop and try them out. Here are some more site that will also help you

    Choice Magazine


    Hospitality Oz

    I eventually decided that the Wusthof was the best knife for me after checking out everything on the internet as well as finally trying each one out. These guys are expensive but at least I wont need to replace them any time soon. They also come with a lifetime guarantee.

    As for buying them individually or in a set, that all depends on whether you are going to use all of them or not. For me I found that purchasing them individually was best for me as the set itself did not contain everything that I wanted so I would have had to purchase more item on top of purchasing the set.
     
  3. Shalmanese

    Shalmanese Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,160
    Location:
    Seattle
    In terms of blade:

    Wustof > Global > Furi

    In terms of comfort

    Furi > Wustof > Global

    In terms of price

    Wustof > Global > Furi

    It's really about priority. IMHO, I instantly stopped considering the global because there is no way I could imagine using that for 1/2 an hour without my hand cramping. I dunno, maybe you can grow into it but I'm not going to waste $90 to find out if that's true or not. Of the other two, I chose the Furi simple because I didn't feel the extra money was worth it at the stage that I am at. If I were to be cooking every night, preparing intricate dishes, I would have probably shelled out for the Wustof. Have you also considered Henckels? They are about the same in terms of blade with the Wustofs but I still prefer the handles of the Wustof.
     
  4. gbh

    gbh Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2001
    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Sydney
    Current knives of choice in the pro world are Kasumi.
    They are incredible. And just as expensive.
     
  5. Shalmanese

    Shalmanese Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,160
    Location:
    Seattle
    Ooh, Damascus steel. I was wondering, when they cracked the secret to that about 5 years ago how long it would take for it to start appearing in commerical applications.

    Basically, Damascus steel was a type of steel which, due to the specific chemical properties of the iron and the special cooling procedures, produced a steel that had ripples of strong/brittle metal and soft/flexible metal running through it. This gave it the intricate structure visible on the blades and also made them amazingly hard and durable. Unfortunately, the steel from that specific mine in india was mined out and replaced with steel from another mine and the voodoo was lost and the technique died with it. Some guys from... UCLA I think... managed to reverse engineer one of the blades and they now know how it was done.
     
  6. gbh

    gbh Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2001
    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Sydney
    Yes.
    There is quite a bit of info out on the web re the technique and method of manufacture.
    Interesting stuff.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    user5124

    user5124 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    741
    I'm going into peters of kensington this Sat. I've narrowed it down to Global and Wusthof, as I haven't really seen any other knives getting such a widespread mention.

    It's going to be really tough to pick between the two.

    Those damascus steel ones are probably great blades, but too hard to find, and too expensive!

    Oh, and I did look at henckeles... Their steel didn't seem to be quite as reputable as global and wusthof. I wonder how they manage to be so consistant.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2004
  8. gbh

    gbh Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2001
    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Sydney
  9. OP
    OP
    user5124

    user5124 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    741
    In the end I used the good advice here, especially the mention of the choice magazine link. That was very helpful.

    Settled on six knives. All up half a K.

    Global 20cm cook knife.
    Global 14cm vegetable knife.
    Global 8cm paring knife.
    Wusthof Culinar 20cm cook knife.
    Wusthof Culinar 14cm utility knife.
    Wusthof Culinar 9cm paring knife.

    All I need now is that magnetic holder, and a decent steel....and some basic cooking knowledge. Right now my idea of competent cooking is putting something in the microwave, or pouring water in.
     
  10. gbh

    gbh Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2001
    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Sydney
    re cooking knowledge:

    Good starting point is with the basics.

    Have a look for some books such as:

    Le Repetoire de la Cuisine by Saulnier (I think)

    Larousse Gastronomique

    Practical Professional Cookery - Cracknell and Kauffman

    The Escoffier Cookbook
     
  11. jobaby

    jobaby Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2002
    Messages:
    475
    Location:
    Carlisle
    If you are after Furi's, Myer have 25% off their Furi Max Block set, which is a good starter set - it just needs the two large East-West knives to make it a good collection. It's $150 with the 25% off, so it's a pretty good place to start.
     
  12. gbh

    gbh Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2001
    Messages:
    2,175
    Location:
    Sydney
    or this audio book I have for sale!

    http://forums.overclockers.com.au/showthread.php?s=&threadid=292139
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2004
  13. KyocEr@~*

    KyocEr@~* Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    3,954
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Excellent choice... although I'd have gone for the Henckels over the Wusthoff personally - based on comments in my expensive knives thread (at the bottom of this forum on the first page at time of writing).
     
  14. woodstock

    woodstock Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Messages:
    225
    Location:
    Hobart
    I thought of this too cause I already had the 23cm east west knife but it won't fit in the set that myer had on special (which i don't think was the max set in Tassie)
     
  15. woodstock

    woodstock Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Messages:
    225
    Location:
    Hobart
    Just curious but why did you get 2 of each knife in different brands?
     
  16. Wylf

    Wylf Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Messages:
    972
    Location:
    Canberra
    I'd vote for the Whustof knives. Bloody brilliant as far as I'm concerned. Never used the others though. I'd recommend against getting the knife blocks though - much better to get single knives as you need them.
     
  17. OP
    OP
    user5124

    user5124 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Messages:
    741
    When I went into the store and held each of them in my hand, I wasn't able to make an immediate decision on which of the two brands made the better knife.

    I felt I'd done my research well enough to know that I wouldn't be dissapointed with either brand, but I winded up getting two of each for a few reasons.

    1. I couldn't easily pick one brand over the other.
    2. I want two pairs of each main knife (cook/util/paring) so that when one pair becomes blunt, I can use the other whilst I find time to sharpen the first.
    3. The wusthof culinar cooks knife cost as much as all of the global knives put together, and so the globals didn't really break the bank as an extra purchase.
    4. As the wusthof and global knives are of such different paradigms, I figure that this will be my learning stage for what's best for me, and I can pursue the winner brand in any future purchases.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2004
  18. PobodY

    PobodY Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2001
    Messages:
    479
    Location:
    Crewe (UK)
    I have the global knives... I figure one-peice construction means there are no nooks and cranies for bacteria to hide in... the steel is quite soft, so blunts relatively easily, but sharpens just as easily (you must use a diamond or ceramic sharpener on these, NOT tungsten or carborundem).

    My hands never cramp, becuase I never have to push hard with them. However, I do have small hands for a man, so the handles are a good size for me. No, they don't slip even when wet and oily...

    Most of all, I like the feeling of that folded japanese steel! Just like a kitchen samurai :D
     
  19. kasar

    kasar Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Messages:
    3,509
    Location:
    Pyrmont, Sydney
    The main problem with Global knives is that most of them don't have any protection near the edge of the blade where you hold your hand. Also, the bolster/finger guard is usually quite weighty making it easier to cut food. Also, I find that the steel handles aren't as easy to grip as others. I find they get too slippery if your hands are even slightly wet.

    ie. [​IMG]
    Click to view full-sized image!
    Hosted by UGBox Image Store

    A normal knife with a bolster looks like this -
    [​IMG]
    Click to view full-sized image!
    Hosted by UGBox Image Store

    Wusthof knives are the best i've ever used but they are too bloody expensive. Henkels aren't too bad, but I don't really like the handles.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2004
  20. itang

    itang Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2002
    Messages:
    136
    Not to nickpick, but the Kasumi knives aren't really damascus steel if they are forged according to japanese swordmaking techniques. Its only 32 layers, and as far as I know the real damascus steels have several 100s to 1000s of layers ?

    Its description also fits that of jap swordsmithing, a softer steel core sandwiched between 2 layers of harder steel, giving the best of both worlds - Edges that retain the sharpness and flexibility along the blade.

    Heh, does anyone really need a mini katana in his/her kitchen ? :lol:

    Oh very good book on Jap swords - The craft of the japanese sword by Leon and Jiroko Kapp/Yoshindo Yoshihara, reccomended
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: