Game Server - 1U - Home

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by BelowAverageIQ, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. BelowAverageIQ

    BelowAverageIQ Member

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    G'Day Crew,

    Firstly, my apologies if this is in the wrong section.

    Have a 9RU cabinet which currently has a 1U Switch and 1U Router, plus power board and patch panel.

    Soon to have rack mounted UPS.

    Want to do a small project for the kids. Game server. Probably DayZ, Minecraft, CS-GO etc.

    The cabinet is only 450mm deep. So server chassis is limited. Cabinet is located in garage which is insulated and very cool in the summer. Noise it not really a problem.

    Purchased this chassis due to 1U requirement and depth:

    https://www.mwave.com.au/product/tg...erver-chassis-case-400mm-depth-no-psu-ac14228

    It supports ATX motherboards.

    Purchased a power supply as well.

    I do have a MSI Z170 gaming board and 6700K CPU which will mean underclocking and probably removing the heatsink shrouds etc.

    Was thinking this CPU cooler:

    https://www.mwave.com.au/product/noctua-nhl9i-low-profile-intel-cpu-cooler-aa16736

    Only rated to 65W TDP though.......

    Have SSD's and M.2 drive for OS.

    Will need some memory and OS.

    I understand that Windows Server is way too expensive. A linux OS would be an option? Never used linux before. In fact as you can probably tell never built or managed an own server before.

    Ideally I would like to use the above to keep the cost relatively cheap. Simple so the kids can manage.

    Thoughts and suggestions welcome. Anyone else built similar within the above constraints?

    Cheers

    BIQ
     
  2. PsydFX

    PsydFX Member

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    Nice little project!

    I am a little worried about the fit. Even with the low profile cooling option you’ve linked, I don’t think you’ll quite squeeze it in - and you’ll also run into airflow issues as a server chassis is generally designed to move air from the front, exhausting out of the back, rather than out of the top.

    Something like the Thermaltake Engine 27 is probably what you’re after, but you’ll need to make sure that the internal fans can provide enough airflow.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
  3. OP
    OP
    BelowAverageIQ

    BelowAverageIQ Member

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    I was thinking that it would be a tight fit, as the motherboard sits on standoffs. It would be close.

    The reviews of the Thermaltake were pretty bad. Worse of all the coolers tested. I assume that most 1U servers only have a passive heatsink and rely on the fans at the front to provide airflow?

    Edit*

    Found this:

    https://www.logic-case.com/products...-115x-all-copper-heatsink-fan-sc-hsf-1u-115x/

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA2W08AM7519&Description=1u heatsink&cm_re=1u_heatsink-_-35-114-150-_-Product

    https://www.coolerguys.com/products/dynatron-cpu-socket-lga1151-lga1155-lga1156-w-pwm-fan
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
  4. PsydFX

    PsydFX Member

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    I read similar reviews. While the Engine 27 was coming consistently last in most tests, it was still adequately cooling the CPU.

    Those Dynatron coolers look alright. Not a lot of details on then, but I suspect they’ll be loud.
     
  5. ex4n

    ex4n Member

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    If I were you, I would be looking at a cheap R610 or something which can be had for about $350-500 with dual X5650/5670 and 48-96GB of ECC RAM, dual PSU, Raid card/HBA, quad 1GB NIC, rails etc. It would be too deep for your rack, but it would be a lot cheaper than building something yourself. I have a couple of similar servers in my garage, they just sit on a shelf out of the way with my switches and router. The R310 is the shallow depth version, should just fit in your rack, but it's usually a low lower spec.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
  6. hairy

    hairy Member

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    disable h.t and undervolt the 6700k to drop temps and enable all the power saving options.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    BelowAverageIQ

    BelowAverageIQ Member

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    G'Day Crew,

    Decided to go with a 2RU chassis, 650mm deep. Installed the MSI Z170A motherboard, 6700K and have the power supply, M.2, HDD. Memory coming tomorrow! (16GB for now).

    Went with the Dynatron K199 CPU cooler which fits perfectly. Post some pics soon. Now to try and install Ubuntu???
     
  8. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Download the Ubuntu ISO, use a tool like Rufus to write it to a spare USB stick, boot off the USB stick and install away.

    I recommend that you create separate partitions for / (root), /var, /srv and /home.

    The / (root) filesystem is the OS itself and all major configuration files (under /etc). When you install new packages and the like, they will go here. Allocate nothing less than 8-10GB so you have room to breathe. The swap file will go here too, but with 16GB RAM you really don't need it. If possible, put the root filesystem on its own dedicated boot drive (such as a cheap 128GB SSD - allocate the entire drive) and put everything else on a second/third drive.

    /var contains system logs and MySQL databases (by default) and you don't want them getting so big that they prevent the system from working properly because they've consumed everything. I usually do about 8-10GB here as a minimum so I can keep lots of logs long term, but it depends on your personal needs.

    /home should be deliberately kept small on a server - you're not going to use it other than the occasional download for something. I usually make mine no bigger than 2-4GB, again to ensure that I don't inadvertently download crap that I don't need to keep and take space away from the root filesystem. If you don't create a separate filesystem for this, it will become part of the / (root) filesystem (as a normal sub-folder /home).

    /srv (or /opt) is where you will generally install things like Minecraft Server, VM's, store other user data like video files, etc. Maximise disk allocation here - whatever is left over after allocating the other filesystems should be given to /srv and this is also a candidate for its own dedicated drive too. By default, /srv (and /opt) is empty, ready for all your user-generated data.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    BelowAverageIQ

    BelowAverageIQ Member

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    G'Day HyRax1,

    Thank you for the awesome reply in both threads. I really appreciate it. I have a 256GB M.2 drive for the OS and the files for the games etc will be going on a 1TB HDD (7200rpm and 128Mb buffer). Will download and Ubuntu onto my spare USB.

    Thanks again. Will be an interesting "little" exercise.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    BelowAverageIQ

    BelowAverageIQ Member

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    Hey Mate,

    Having trouble installing Ubuntu Server on the actual hardware server. The screen shot, was from the Virtual Box install.

    With the hardware, I get an error "no such device" "grub rescue".

    I did have Ubuntu Desktop on the hardware.

    When the system installs and reboots, I have to remove the USB drive (install .iso with rufus), otherwise it reboots and starts the install process again............

    Sorry to be a pain.

    Cheers

    Rob
     
  11. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Disable UEFI, or make sure Legacy support is enabled in the BIOS and boot from the Legacy menu (purple colour) instead of the UEFI menu (black menu) on the Ubuntu boot stick.
     
  12. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    Can you run ESXi on it? Or another hyper-visor? Becomes a little more versatile then.
     

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