General Aquarium Talk NO SELLING Swaps go in the Fish/Plant Swap Sticky

Discussion in 'Pets & Animals' started by Zoiks, May 9, 2008.

  1. Agg

    Agg Lord of the Pings

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    Full size sulo bin! 240L I think. For a ~600L tank plus 3x big canisters.
     
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  2. Sorrow

    Sorrow Member

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    Hi All!

    I'm a bit of a newbie to Aquariums but I've wanted one for a while.. given the pending lockdown I've been thinking about taking the plunge but I was hoping somebody might be able to answer a couple of basic questions for me.

    I was over at Annerley Aquarium last week to have a look at what sort of options I had available. Being a bit of a fishing nut, Marine is where I would like to go eventually but planning on starting with tropical freshwater so ideally a tank which would I could switch over in the future would be ideal. I quite liked the look of the Dymax GS DM636 which is 95x45x50(10mm) which I guess is on the pricier side of things, but it comes with the stand etc and I would like the look of it as a feature on my living room. Then looking to add live plants etc... get some moss growing on some driftwood and work out which fish I'd like to put in the tank.

    Now I guess the other question and maybe the most important is.. I live in Milton in a 1 bedroom flat which is mainly carpeted... is this a sensible decision to be making when it comes to cleaning water/tanks etc?

    Cheers,
     
  3. spit051261

    spit051261 Member

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    Back in the UK , snakeheads were my fav's , especially keeping them in a community tank.
    The only fish left were the ones that were too big for them to eat.
    They got very big too.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2020
  4. Digit

    Digit Member

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    Toughie, I'd say give it a go and get good at not spilling anything while doing your water changes lol. I haven't mastered it but I also don't give a shit because it's in the garage so... I don't spill much on my mini betta tank which is inside so it's possible.

    That's a nice sized tank though. You could do some smaller american cichlids like my setup (Electric blue acara, Geophagus Red Head Tapajos), or angels or dwarf cichlids like apistogramma/rams with schooling tetra's. These are probably the most popular options outside guppies etc, and shows you the personality they're capable of.

    I don't really have any experience with saltwater so I can't say what's involved with the maintenance or changing it over.
     
  5. herzeg

    herzeg Iron Photographer

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    Pardon me piggy-backing onto this, but I'm half considering getting into it also. Appreciate some advice on the complexity of maintenance of tropical vs cold setup - is tropical "much" more difficult to maintain? Temp should be pretty straight forward, but pH has me uncertain... Also is frequency of changing water, cleaning different between the two? Cheers
     
  6. Digit

    Digit Member

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    I honestly haven't found tropical to be harder to maintain at all. Goldfish are seen as being easier because they're very hardy, however they get big and generate soo much waste, so you need a larger tank and still need to perform regular water changes. You can also get very hardy tropical fish, and there is such a huge variety that you can choose smaller fish, which require a smaller tank, and are less effort to maintain (maybe a bucket or two a week depending on tank size and what you put in there).

    pH is the least of your worries for most species, some are a bit more picky like discus or wild type Apistogramma, but I'd recommend not jumping into the deep end for your first tank. Your best of having a chat to your LFS about your local water parameters, researching which fish do well in those conditions, and going with those. You'll have to throw less chemicals into the water when you do water changes.

    best of luck herzeg, any more questions I'd be happy to help, it really is a very cool hobby.
     
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  7. herzeg

    herzeg Iron Photographer

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    Cheers, mate.
     
  8. .Radiant

    .Radiant Member

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    trop vs cold is the same same, difference is just temps really. There's certain chemical interactions that occur quicker and are potentially more deadly to your fish at colder temps but honestly as long as you're not excessively messing with your setup e.g. throwing all sorts of additives in or changing temps all the time, you'll be fine. Consistency really is key across both (and marine!) and if change is needed, make sure it is gradual.
     
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  9. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    herzeg - what these guys ^^ have said
    i've got a number of fish over 15yrs old and one is probably well past 25yr, no ph adjustments or other water parameter adjustments here.
    tapwater with high quality water ager/de-chlorinater (seachem prime) and lots of filtration.
    staying on top of weekly water changes is super important too.
     
  10. herzeg

    herzeg Iron Photographer

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    Thanks, guys. Thinking of a 130L setup; currently thinking cold with some tendanus catfish and zebra danios - am I better of setting it up and getting the environment going for a while before putting the fish in? Are live plants easy to look after? Also, are there "better" filters that minimise the need to clean the tank (waste off gravel, etc)?
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  11. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    am I better of setting it up and getting the environment going for a while before putting the fish in?
    absolutely, read up on the nitrogen cycle. it is critical to any life in your tank

    Are live plants easy to look after?
    I've never had any luck, but my fish think digging up plants, real or plastic, is an absolute fantastic game
    i swear they know i get pissed off and do it as a wind up

    Also, are there "better" filters that minimise the need to clean the tank (waste off gravel, etc)?
    do not under estimate the maintenance involved in aquariums. there is a lot and it's a fixed weekly task. you cant skip a week too many times without poor outcomes :)
    better filters are better as they are quieter, more reliable, have better media included.
    naturally the china knockoffs are right up there these days, so its likely only reliability that is questionable
     
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  12. herzeg

    herzeg Iron Photographer

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    Thanks, mate. Speaking of Chinese knockoffs, I have a Biopro reseller in the area; aquariums seem like good value, may check them out next week.
     
  13. Digit

    Digit Member

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    My understanding is the Tandanus catfish can become HUGE, like 60cm+ huge, too large for a 130L, and they will definitely eat your zebra danio's once they're large enough.

    Live plants, I've not had a HEAP of luck with, but I'm really just starting to research it more now, you need a decent light, and nutrients for them, like a planted tank substrate. This can be done on the cheap using organic potting soil capped with sand, or just use sand (pool filter sand from bunnings cheap and good, just wash it) and adding fertiliser balls like Seachem Flourish Tabs. Or if you have the money ADA Amazonia.

    As far as filtration goes, this will sound weird, but everyone over filters, because the ramifications of underfiltering can kill your fish. Simple sponge filters are super cheap and effective, but are ugly in the tank, then your hang on back/canister filters have less in the tank, and you can add more media to them or carbon etc.

    As mentioned above, the nitrogen cycle is critical, fish produce waste as ammonia, which is toxic, so you need bacteria to convert it to something less harmful (nitrate), which you remove through regular water changes. You can't skip them. Filters do not remove nitrates.



    I am experimenting with low maintenance techniques at the moment, but with the lockdown I can't get the hardscape I want so... I can't tell you how it's going, but there are some cool videos online where people try the Walstad method, which uses plants to remve nitrates, which should reduce the amount of water changes. Lookup Foo the Flowerhorn on Youtube or try this playlist; or this video
     
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  14. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    i've often thought a small desktop tank, no external filter and a couple of CRS would be nice ... low maintenance would be a nice change too
     
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  15. herzeg

    herzeg Iron Photographer

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    Just watched the whole series of the second video; amazing...
     
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  16. .Radiant

    .Radiant Member

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    Foo the flowerhorn has some great content :thumbup:

    Live plants can be easy, it just depends on what you get. Most stores sell the easy to grow plants but a lot also sell non aquatics for some reason - look up the dragon flame plant or the aluminium plant, sold as aquatic plants but slowly die off. Easy place to start is definitely Vallisneria, common Cryptocornes, common Anubias and Java ferns. All manage under low light and need little to no care. If you've got a bit more light, you can venture out into the easy to manage stem plants like hornwort, cabomba and bacopa. You don't *need* to fertlise or have soil/clay substrates to grow plants, your fish produce plenty of waste which can be taken up by the plants but having another source of nutrients definitely helps.
     
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  17. Digit

    Digit Member

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  18. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    good link :thumbup:
    but,
    hard tube between four tanks !!
    wow, that guy is asking for nightmares come cleaning day :D
     
  19. Andres

    Andres Motor Admin

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    We've had a 1200mm x 600mm x 450mm (LxHxW) tank in storage for about 10 years (interstate move) and am entertaining the idea of eventually setting it up. It's never had water in it as after we had it made we didn't have faith in the floorboards in our previous house.

    I've got an old Eheim 2217 (which I think may be a little undercooked for this tank). 1000L/h.

    I'm going to price up a few odds and ends to get it up and running. Are there any recommended online stores for lights, filter, etc?

    IMG_20200224_183553.jpg

    It's either 'set it up' or 'sell it off' as it's temporarily sitting in the carport at the moment.
    Would go tropical, not saltwater to keep costs down.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2020
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  20. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    my goto shop has recently closed, so i cant help with the where to get stuff right now.
    I use sefmarpetcare on ebay for my 1L of 'prime'. but i havent looked at anything else they have yet

    just looking at that pic, you'll definately need more foam under the glass
    also, a single 2213 will be too small. I used to run 2 of them on a 5x2x2 and it was close, but in the end i bought a FX5 and havent looked back
     

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