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General Astronomy, Cosmology and Space Exploration Discussion

Discussion in 'Science' started by BlueRaven, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Awesome photo!

    One of the things I loved about Elite: Dangerous was the "to scale" (and reasonably accurate as far as we currently know - even predicting planets quite well that had not yet been discovered))simulation of the Milky Way. With a ship capable of jumping 35 light years, it took me something like 2 weeks to get tot he other side of the Galaxy from the Sol system. Even with 35 light years of jump range, there were still plenty of stars that could not be reached. My last long jump ship had a range of just short of 80 light years, and still there were plenty of places I was unable to reach.

    On top of that, within system, you basically have a "Supercruise" drive capable of propelling you up to 2000C, though the actual speed was determined by gravity fields of nearby stars and planets. There were systems where you literally point your ship at a dot, push the throttle to max, and walk away and make yourself something to eat for 10 or so minutes (sometimes more), and that was how you got tot he planet you were wanting to visit.

    Whilst, yes, it is still just a game, it really helped put in to perspective just how small we really are.


    Z...
     
  2. mrbean_phillip

    mrbean_phillip Member

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    Last edited: Apr 29, 2022
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  3. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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  4. Zee

    Zee Member

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  5. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2022
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  6. OP
    OP
    BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    Missed it by [this much]

    I mean, they didn't miss it at all of course so the concept is proven which is friggin' incredible quite frankly.
    I wonder where they go with it next? As in, was the stability issue caused by inadequencies in the platform itself (the chopper and its inherent aerodynamic qualities) or the capture mechanism and how it manages the transition of a dynamic load into a (semi-)static load hanging under the recovery aircraft.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2022
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  7. t8y

    t8y Member

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    I was impressed by the catch too. The idea is cool as hell and opens up a lot of new, cheaper recovery options while allowing for a less complex rocket or more fuel/payload for that stage.
    I'm glad they went with caution and dropped it. hopefully they should have the data they needed to improve it for next time.
    edit; not sure if posted but demoed here
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2022
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  8. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    Tiny:


    Short:


    Medium:


    Long:
     
  9. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    To summarise the videos from my above post;

    - Two black holes have now been imaged.
    - M87 - a crazy huge beast of a black hole in a distant galaxy Messier 87, that is so large that clearer images can be made out.
    - Sagittarius A* - The much, much smaller (in comparison to M87) blackhole at the centre of our Milkyway galaxy.

    Draw dropping moment - The astrophysicists and radiographers freakin' recorded M87.


    FluffyConcernedKronosaurus-size_restricted[1].gif
     
  10. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    This is a great lecture on how exactly they did what they've done, starts ~16 min mark.



    The scale of these things, absolutely incredible;

    upload_2022-5-17_18-56-56.png
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2022
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  11. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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  12. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    That's a concern. I am really hoping that it's actually someone who's simply fucked something up and they're using "meteorites" as a cover... cause the telescope hasn't really been exposed for very long, but to think it's already coping hits that risk damaging it... :Paranoid:

    Edit:


    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddar...-about-the-toughness-of-nasa-s-webb-telescope
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2022
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  13. OP
    OP
    BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    Corrects his own conspiracy theory with an edit. Top work pal. ;)

    Seriously though, that's really interesting because it highlights the wonders of the mylar/aluminium sunshield material and the resilience/adjustability of the mirror assembly.
    They designed the thing to get punched full of tiny (and possibly not-so-tiny) holes and be subject to micrometeoroids striking it at insane velocities, and she'll be right for the design lifetime mate.
    Everything I learn about this spacecraft astounds me more and more.

    Edit: corrected "micrometeorites" to the correct term; they only become meteorites once they enter the atmosphere.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2022
  14. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    https://www.abc.net.au/news/science...est-growing-past-nine-billion-years/101149598
    [​IMG]



    JSmith
     
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  15. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    It's hard to imagine the size of these things in many respects
     
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  16. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    Absolutely mate, it boggles the mind. Not just the size, but the immense forces involved.

    This is pretty cool;





    JSmith
     
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  17. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    Spaghetification sounds like a barrel of laughs :shock:
     
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  18. OP
    OP
    BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    I vaguely remember first hearing about this while watching Red Dwarf (or possibly reading Hitchhiker's Guide? can't remember).
    And then being surprised and thoroughly amused when I later discovered that it's actually a (somewhat) legit term for the theoretical effects. :)

    Regarding the sizes of things:
    The various systems and methods that human beings have invented to try and fit very very large or small numbers/things into an easily graspable "everyday" frame of reference are informative in an academic way.
    But what we've really ended up with is a variety of numerical units/systems of notation/common analogies which try very hard and do a passable job for the relatively small number of people who have been trained in their use.
    For "the rest of us"... they're still basically meaningless, whether you're talking about Astronomical Units or logarithmic notation or Light Years or Molar weights or whatever.

    Even some of those common analogies don't really help.
    "There are as many stars in the Milky Way as there are grains of sand on all the beaches on Earth, and that's just one galaxy, and we can see xxxxxx galaxies from our position in the observable universe..."
    Cool, thanks mate. Now I just need to figure out a way to properly grasp and visualise the scale of billions of tiny grains of sand on all the world's beaches, so I can compare that to billions of stars.
    The concept of a "light year" is utterly meaningless to a vast number of people, because those people don't know that photons actually have to move from their source to your eyes for you to "see" light.

    We're just not built to handle this cosmic (or atomic) stuff man.
    At least, I'm certainly not. Good thing that there's a few people who are. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2022
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  19. BurningFeetMan

    BurningFeetMan Member

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    I like to think that we're actually a black hole right now - where everything we can observe is accelerating to a central point that's so far away, the only effect we can observe is the Doppler effect on distant objects that look to be accelerating away. This thought hurts my brain.
     
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  20. MUTMAN

    MUTMAN Member

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    I pondered some of this early this morning.
    Are we seeing a modified event horizon from "the other side" ??
    Yer, space hurts my limited knowledge a lot :D
     

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