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GNU Linux on Asus Netbook?

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by CoHmodderSolo, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    Im bringing back life to an old netbook I have. Its an Asus Eee PC 1000H.

    Problem is what OS should I install. I know that Windows XP (which laptop came with) is no longer supported so I dont want that then I saw GNU Linux on the specs page.

    is that a custom built Linux suited for my model netbooks?
     
  2. SoulFire-Z

    SoulFire-Z Member

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    Nah, no specialised distribution necessary (GNU is just GNU's Not Unix).

    If you haven't had much linux experience, I'd give ubuntu a go. There is a lot of online support in their forum area. Maybe look at a few distros, make live bootable usbs and just give them a go :)

    Edit: If you're feeling adventurous, there is always the android-x86 project. This isn't too hard to install either, but driver support could be lacking (depending on your hardware) :)
     
  3. Joe Public

    Joe Public Member

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  4. lazjen

    lazjen Member

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    I've done Gentoo and a Hackintosh on a similar netbook, so go for it. :)
     
  5. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    thanks guys..

    Id like to avoid android, my experience on the Asus Transformer wasnt that pleasant.

    Ubuntu is looking like the way to go.

    Manjaro? never heard of it.
     
  6. zero_velocity

    zero_velocity Member

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    Ubuntu will quite frankly, run like shit on a netbook.

    As stated before, if you really wanna go there, go lubuntu or xubuntu (much less resource intensive DE) but you lose your 'pretty' with these DE's as they are cut down for performance.

    I'm actually going to give Manjaro a go on my netbook, currently running lubuntu and thats OK, but would prefer something a little snappier

    Edit: OP i actually have the exact same netbook :p
     
  7. Lem0n

    Lem0n Member

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    I also was trying to bring back to life an eMachines EM350 and tried a few different Linux distros; CrunchBang, Mint and now Lubuntu.

    Lubuntu has been the best for me so far, small and lightweight, but still easy to use as a Linux noob, however there's still lag using the netbook and limited by the Atom processor.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    they were pretty good back in the day. :lol:

    Considering getting a cheap windows 8 key too.
     
  9. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Specs page for that laptop say Atom CPU, 1GB RAM. I wouldn't use the default Ubuntu, but instead it's lightweight little brother Lubuntu.

    http://lubuntu.net/
     
  10. @kernelhack

    @kernelhack Member

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    I have one of those machines and I run it with Xubuntu. Runs excellent.
     
  11. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    How is XFCE and Xubuntu going these days? I was a big fan of it for ages, but noticed it was starting to get bloated and resource hungry for a while there. Have they trimmed it down again, and returned to the projects original design goals of a fast DE?

    I don't really like LXDE (desktop for Lubuntu) nearly as much, but it seems to the the only desktop environment of late that does what I want it to do, and not consume enormous amounts of RAM.
     
  12. Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    Lubuntu 14.04 for sure! I have it on an older netbook and it runs great. I have a custom image as well which can be installed in a few minutes I will upload shortly if you'd like a copy.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    What's all these different versions? How many are there?

    Smoking whale whats the advantage of a custom image?
     
  14. Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    It's basically optimised for user friendliness with a number of tweaks and workarounds for some common bugs out there. I made a thread a while ago saying I was going to upload it, just been a little lazy uploading it.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    Yes please! Polished things are always preferable. :D
     
  16. @kernelhack

    @kernelhack Member

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    I know what you mean, but you should revisit it, as it has dramatically been reduced in size and is now exactly what it should be.

    I have installed Xubuntu on desktops and servers.
     
  17. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    See my Linux 101 thread stickied at the top of this subforum. It answers all your questions.

    In short, there is no "Linux Inc" who make "Linux". It's an open source project with contributors from all over the world, including some of the world's biggest companies right down to individual developers.

    Linux provides tonnes of choice. There are many different bits of software out there that make it up, and often many projects that aim to do the same thing. On the desktop there are a variety of different environments you can choose from. Unlike Windows or Mac where you get told what the desktop will look like and how it will work, Linux offers you quite literally dozens of desktop environments depending on your needs (because everyone's needs are different, so why should everyone be forced to use the same thing?).

    A "Linux Distribution" is a collection of tools and applications bundled up for easy use. Ubuntu is a very popular distribution aimed at being user-friendly for desktop users. By default, Ubuntu uses the "Unity" desktop, which is a fully featured desktop aimed at modern systems. Other people build Ubuntu-based distributions with different desktops. Kubuntu uses the KDE Desktop, which is also aimed at modern computers.

    If instead you have an old system and either Unity or KDE are too heavy for your old clunker, then other desktop environments like XFCE (rolled up into Xubuntu) or LXDE (rolled up into Lubuntu) are there to try.

    Choice is good. Yes, it can be confusing at first, but having choice is a good thing. What I need and what you need out of a computer are very different, so why should we be forced to use the same thing?
     
  18. OP
    OP
    CoHmodderSolo

    CoHmodderSolo Member

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    Ive always admired the open source-ness of linux.. hear lots about tweaks and mods to the OS in conversations and articles.. but one thing that's holding me back is video games support. If only Linux could run as many games as windows I would make the change instantly. That's why Im looking forward to steam OS. Another concern for me is also security. Being open source, is it (to put simply) safe?
     
  19. DistoProto

    DistoProto Member

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    Generally Linux would be considered far safer than Windows.

    Security through obscurity is a fairly flawed concept. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_through_obscurity
     
  20. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    This is changing. I only use Linux, and have a growing Steam library. Although to be fair, I generally hate FPS and RTS games, which means I can live with console games as my primary source of entertainment

    Generally speaking the average time to patch open source vulnerabilities (particularly critical ones) is same-day. (Companies like RedHat release their stats publicly, and you can see these in action thanks to the open source community and 100% transparent nature of developing out in the open).

    Compare and contrast to Microsoft, who currently are struggling to meet their 90-day commitment to security patching. Google are pressuring Microsoft to speed this up, and reduce the window to 60 days. An idea which Microsoft is highly critical of.

    In short, if security was your genuine concern, Microsoft would be the platform that should give you more worry. :)
     

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