Golden age of PC Gaming

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade' started by Sphinx2000, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    Despite being ruled out, I'll offer my limited insights. The games I played growing up framed my expectations which weren't met every time a new release came to market from developers, so I slowly moved away from the big firms whose initial success I supported.

    Namely and in no particular order; dumbing down of problem solution, changing how titles were played (CoH 1vs 2, Rome Total War 1 vs 2, etc.) focus on graphics over gameplay, poor netcode, micro transactions and the people I enjoyed playing with all seemed to fade away at the same time as grown up responsibilities took over their lives.
     
  2. Arctic_Silver08

    Arctic_Silver08 Member

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    Exactly the same for me, it's like 90's bands and cars - sure I'd love to re-live those memories, but would it be the same today? No

    In fact for me sometimes even re-living old memories can ruin the nostalgia and fondness that I had in my memory.



    World of Warcraft is probably the newest game I'll be forever fond of - it's up there with my 90/00's classics like Golden Eye, Smash Bros, Twisted Metal, Pokemon, Mario
     
  3. melatonin

    melatonin Member

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    I kinda see it this was, take the example below.

    Make a really short story - easy
    Make a short story- easy to medium
    Make a long funny story - hard

    Putting constraints on things can make things easier and more interesting. Take terminator 2 or predator for example. CG was used only when it had to be. You barely see the predator and its awesome.

    A limitation can be a good thing but we don't have limits anymore. Not necessarily a bad thing but like you said seems creativity seems to have dropped with the rise in engines unreal unity ect.

    All the interesting stuff comes from the indie scene, I came across this a little while ago https://store.steampowered.com/app/204240/The_Bridge/
     
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  4. jimbogimp

    jimbogimp Member

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    funny comment
    The OP picture brought me back to the days when I first got a job and all my money was funnelled into my PC. My room at that time looked like an extremely messy version of the above but witout the game boxes and probably less natural light.

    But for me, the golden era of gaming was Battlefield BC2 ~ 2010. Windows 7 made the networking easy, ADSL, Graphics were looking impressive and games were still fun. Oh, and no kids :)
    Had a bunch of lans with my mates around that time and heaps of online play inbetween. Good times indeed.
     
  5. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    I miss C64 load screens and most of all the SID music. :D

    Today's games are awesome, but can sometimes be a bit like fly by wire vs direct surface control in aircraft... sometimes it just doesn't feel like you have direct control.


    JSmith
     
  6. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

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    Yes this is a big part of the nostalgia for me. I have fond memories of saving up money for ages for that game I wanted, going to the shop and buying it, then reading through the manual in the car on the way home. I had to work hard to afford a game so I made sure I got my money's worth out of it.

    Now my steam library is filled with stuff I bought on sale and never played :\


    Having said that...

    I've played through all my boxed games at least once in the last decade and some of them just haven't aged well at all. I start them up and play for maybe half an hour to get that nostalgia hit and then don't go back to them. Some of them are buggy or have annoying flaws that I would have overlooked in my youth, but now I am less patient and more discerning of my use of free time. I remember being enthralled by many of these games yet struggle to recapture that feeling again.
     
  7. Vanne

    Vanne Member

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    Someone mentioned a analogy to cars, which i don't really believe in, but got me thinking...
    Cars todays are stupidized/dumb downed version of the same things we had 20 years ago, and they are produced for the masses.. , nice and safe.. Gaming used to be a niche, now its the same as people that go buy your average piece of crap car, just to get you from A to B, politically correct and all the crap that goes with that. Its mediocre. I do feel games now days are very similar, just punched out for the masses as its just big business now. Not only that, but how many software houses are left? 3? 4? no wonder most of the stuff being pushed to us is all the same crap.
     
  8. okclock123

    okclock123 Member

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    Echoing what some posters said before: for me current situation is that the neverending barrage of media kills the interest for me. Can we have fewer entertainment options please?

    I remember waiting for deus ex for a couple years then finished it in 3 days. Now its the other way round - you wait 3 days for new games and you never finish them because they drag for eternity.
     
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  9. Utetopia

    Utetopia Member

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    RTS gaming died for me in 1997. Total Annihilation was the absolute peak of it, despite the ugly voxel graphics. And they never succeeded it. 22 years and nothing. Fk Supcom.
     
  10. melatonin

    melatonin Member

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    *starcraft has entered the chat*
     
  11. callan

    callan Member

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    And Blizzard just announced that the next version has been canned.

    My take on things has several different contributing factors.
    Then every next game is leaps ahead of the previous one: it kept the gaming experience fresh. Whole new genres had to be invented: The FPS, Interactive movie, RTS, MMORG, graphic and clicky adventure games, the puzzles a'la Myst.. All those had to be invented, and they were in Elvis and my "golden gaming age".
    Before then you basically had platformers (screen based and scrollers) and basic arcade games and ports. (Oh, and text adventures).
    There games like Kings Quest, Wolfenstein then Doom and Quake. Myst, Unreal, Wing Commander. The Seventh Guest, Phantasmagoria, and Under a Killing Moon. Day of the Tentacle and the Monkey Island series. Half Life. Diablo. Dune and Dune 2. Warcraft1 and Starcraft. All of them defined whole genres.

    Then there's the age thing. I've become very much the grumpy curmugeon Elvis alludes to: responsibilities have chiseled a cynicism, nay impatience in me and somehow, despite being retired I have even less time to game than I used to. Hell, I don't even have a single game on my mobile phone!!!!)

    There's a bit of the "seen it all before" - sure, and while my 50+ year eyes may look back with a distinct rose-tint, I look to today's world in a harsh, surgical stark white - tinted with blue :(. Sometimes I think I should get myself a pair of those peril-sensitive glasses Zaphod wore...

    I still come across games that rekindle the magic, though - games almost exclusively indie publications.
    Ghost of a tale is an enchanting, delightful and enthralling adventure game. A MUST PLAY. (just remember to move the barrels of explosive to the mound on the spit by the sea, or you're in for a hard time come the denouement!!)
    Syberia 3 captures the magic of the original Syberia: a game my wife and I both played and never wanted to end.
    Mechanarium, and Samarost (particularly Samarost 3). Just magic: bewitching characters, worlds, Clever puzzles that challenge and extend without being silly hard, and amazing soundtracks by Floex.
    Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice. Crawls inside your mind and messes with it like no other game I've ever played, and breathtakingly well done.
    And of course, Tex Murphy: Tesla Effect brings to a conclusion one of the greatest FMV game series of all time. (read the book by Aaron Connor, too!).
    And I've become rather partial to the cynically named "walking simulation"genre - games like "What Remains of Edith Finch". I did find "Dear Esther" rather droll, but at least the sound track is ok.

    So they're out there. Imaginative games are out there, new genres and ideas are still being explored, and the magic can still be found.
    Just steer away from the big labels is a pretty safe bet.

    Callan
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
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  12. Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    Well.. I've just finished space quest 1 + 2 (ega) with my 5 year old son, he enjoyed both of them. 3 is next... cheap on gog.. and still as entertaining as ever imo.
     
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  13. callan

    callan Member

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    Brilliant soundtrack on SQ3 btw. Random fact: it was composed by Bob Siebenberg, of Supertramp fame!!! (Drummer)

    Callan
     
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  14. Bold Eagle

    Bold Eagle Member

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    In short the vast majority of content that is coming out is a re-hash of something that has already been done. In a vast majority of cases it has been done poorly.

    Your comparing to the era of the 'Dawn of Creation' as far as PC gaming was concerned. Playing 'Pong' on the home console on the little B&W portable sized TV, developing 'hand eye co-ordination' for those that were to poor or physically awkward suddenly became a reality. Then we had the the Space Invaders *boom chuck-a-la-lah* were now defending Earth from Alien invaders. Galaga takes it higher, Pac-Man, Defender, Joust>>Atari and then along comes this little fat Italian with a mustache and hat called 'Mario'............the NES and the home entertainment console goes utterly ballistic. Amiga 500 and Dungeon Quest...........and then out the dark and murky Abyss we got Doom for the really atmospheric - woops did I just poop my pants, then.....WTF why is my heart beating so rapidly......fuck.fuck...fuccckkkkk............ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

    In all of those cases they were 'new', mind blowing and original in so many aspects.

    In most cases now, most things have been done before, many parts of the brain have already had stimuli sent (in some cases vast amounts) creating roadways that are now very clearly mapped and some have become highways that are tending towards being boring! This is the critical point if the stimuli is just a repeat of old and previous stimuli then the amount needed to create a buzz becomes ever greater. If we drive down the same road day in, day out for ten years it becomes 'the norm' - same old, same old and unless something significant occurs we find it mundane or even tedious. That is what the vast majority of games are, and need to try to surpass.

    VR is going to be the next high and if done well will start stimulating 'other parts of the brain' and developing new neural pathways, or expanding on those rarely used and again elevating a sense of stimulation not felt for quite a while.

    The vast majority of games I play quickly seem tired and can become boring. You can only play Lara Craft 25347238 times before it just simply becomes tedious.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
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  15. melatonin

    melatonin Member

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    I must have missed that, got a source for me?
     
  16. kogi

    kogi Member

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    I think we were lucky to be surfing the wave at the start of gaming. We got to experience every new genre being created.

    Right now it feels like it's things being reskinned with a few twists thrown in.
     
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  17. Daft_Munt

    Daft_Munt Member

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    Err no, VR isnt going to be the greatest thing. Christ it has been tried before eg virtual boy. It is being driven by big multinationals, kind of like 3d TV and cinemas. It just hasnt taken off even with billions thrown at it. Smartphones and the impact on the brain is now being looked at and the results dont seem great. Fuck knows what VR will do to our brains.

    I guess it goes back to the idea that gaming (PC and console) used to be a fairly niece market in the 80 and 90s, now it is big business, with everyone has a smartphone, the market has changed. The PS2 and the DVD player had an impact on the market. FYI I dont want to bring up the gamer gate shite.

    As for the actual games, so much focus on visuals/technical crap, not gameplay is my biggest gripe. COD etc are just an evolution of Doom/Commander Keen. Imagination has also been lost, as has difficulty due to a focus on a larger market. Then add DLC/internet connection to play a game, has me playing pre-DLC/internet games (mostly consoles) as I just want to play a game, not download some fucking update just to play. Which is why my PS3 hardly gets used.

    <Edit> Kogi sums up my opinions.
     
  18. Bold Eagle

    Bold Eagle Member

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    I have to agree it was like we got to see the creation of 'games' and then watch it evolve - without wanting to be coarse or even crass it is like we saw the 'start of life' (digital life) from the stromatolites>>marine organisms>>plankton>>fish>>etc>>etc>>walking on land>>etc...........

    We were very lucky and during that experience we had a a lot a neural pathways 'discovered', created, formed and were feeling constantly stimulated during these phases.

    I should have been more specific - here come's my billion dollar idea, please don't don't steal it - but anyway. VR in a set-up like bungee aerobics with a G-Force suit on - so not just the visual and hearing stimuli - but a whole of body stimuli. Add in smells being blown into the users locality (smoke, food, vegetation, ocean, etc.) and weather conditions (rain, heat, cold, etc). To be clear my concept is quite a bit more advanced than I have noted above and will allow alot greater user feedback - than I am willing to just state here - I have already stated to much in trying to make a point.

    That is you also feel and smell the game, now incorporating 4 senses. Taste is just to weird to incorporate.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  19. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I think we all need to be careful comparing "VR today" with a hypothetical "VR in 20 years".

    Never forget, the Atari 2600 was once the peak of gaming technology.
     
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  20. callan

    callan Member

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    Kotaku is as good as any. There are plenty more.

    Callan
     

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