[WIN10] Gone back to WIN 7

Discussion in 'Windows Operating Systems' started by Mathuisella, Apr 26, 2018.

?

All driver/game/compatability issues aside, which do you perfer 7 or 10

  1. Windows 7

    46.3%
  2. Windows 10

    53.7%
  1. Statitica

    Statitica Member

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    Really, so you're telling me that Windows didn't reactivate the update service on multiple machines after we had manually disabled it? I guess everyone else reporting the same issue is wrong too...
     
  2. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    1200 (20hrs in minutes)/230 work days a year (5 days a week x 46 weeks (52 weeks - public holidays and 4 weeks anual leave give or take)) == 5.2yrs ROI (in years) ... NB this can be reduced ROI 5.2yrs / (number of emplyees that save 1 min a day)

    This useless hypothesis brought to you by management logic.
     
  3. millsy_c

    millsy_c Member

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    NT 5.1 > NT6 = massive HAL driver level changes, requiring a lot of work for making fun shit like CNC machines work.

    But that's like... 13 years ago, XP went out 5 years ago.

    If your vendor isn't supporting Windows 10 / 2016/2019 they're being lazy.

    The latest RDP vuln goes to show the risks of this quite well, Win 8.1+ not affected, Win7 is though, unless you had NLA enabled.
     
  4. Dilbery

    Dilbery Member

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    No, what I'm saying is I have control over my fleet.

    Manually disabled? There is your problem. Understand what uses WUAUServ what it does and how it functions, it's not hard for something running under an admin context to restart the service from a disabled state...
     
  5. BAK

    BAK Member

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    Sorry Dilbery you're in the wrong thread for this kind of thing.
     
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  6. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I understand. I've done work before on a volunteer basis for very small operations (including remote not for profits, charities, etc), and it's always a tough gig when you've got high end requirements but zero budget and only volunteer skillsets to utilise.

    My only advice would be to look at a good community-driven firewall solution like OpenWRT (can be flashed onto cheap [home user level] domestic routers or run off a Raspberry Pi) or pfSense (will run off almost any old computer, recommended to at least have AES-NI support on CPU and 2GB of RAM, so it's the perfect re-purpose for a decommissioned desktop). Both of those have options to either manually, or via community plugins block a lot of communication back and forth to Microsoft, and most of it can be done via GUIs.

    Both options are technical, but should be doable by anyone with a bit of tech support and networking 101 know how.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
  7. power

    power Member

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    an W10 is the problem here how?
     
  8. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    He's on a site with very, very expensive/poor Internet access. He turns updates off to save precious and expensive bandwidth. They turn back on at random times with no warning.

    He has neither the funds nor the staffing to make it better. The OS doesn't give him the flexibility, and assumes that everyone in the world has first-world access to Internet.

    Not a common problem for most of us who have far more resources to work with, even in our homes here in Australia (my kids both run Win10, and I have both the bandwidth and the technology to manage it as a home user).
     
  9. power

    power Member

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    did you read the spoiler..... yikes. even with almost no budget you can do better than this.
     
  10. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Yes, read the spoiler. Check where he's posting from in the world.

    We've just come off two back to back jobs doing shit in Fiji. That's miles ahead in availability of tech by comparison, and it was a nightmare.

    If you want to help him out, price up shipping your old gear to him. Get ready for shipping costs from hell.
     
  11. power

    power Member

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    C2D is more than 10 years old as is W7 and Server 2008.

    there's no budget and getting what's coming to you.

    Any org that can't update PC's once in a decade, are they even viable?
     
  12. millsy_c

    millsy_c Member

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    Course they're viable, they're everywhere, running XP on 12 year old machines around the country! Genuinely not being sarcastic either.
     
  13. power

    power Member

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    i know :(
     
  14. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I say again: I've worked for volunteer orgs that do important work for people who otherwise have zero support network.

    An example was "Victims of Crime" here in Queensland. When the court system is done with you, justice has failed to be served, and you're left emotionally, financially and often physically battered and bruised, they're the only ones left to help you. Should they shut down because they can't afford to upgrade their Core2Duos to Core i7s?

    Sometimes computers are the last thing to get money in an org, and for reasons legitimately beyond the control of the people running the org. I know in our white bread, first world, banal private sector business lives, it's easy to forget that not every org is full of shit and does nothing genuinely important with their time. Indeed, that's almost entirely why I volunteer - to remind myself that somewhere, somehow, there are still things that matter. Not like 99% of the bullshit we all carry on about in these forums.
     
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  15. millsy_c

    millsy_c Member

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    #cloudallthethings.

    But that's for another thread.
     
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  16. Statitica

    Statitica Member

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    To answer this bluntly, no. We're not even close to viable, and if it wasn't for support from overseas donors, we wouldn't have a hope of keeping the doors open and the program running.

    But when the choice comes down to providing medical care for an abused child, paying the counsellors for 160 young fellas in rehab, the court fees for a victim of domestic violence, or upgrading an outdated IT infrastructure, which do you choose?

    Which is the best use of donor funds? Which has the best return for investment?

    Edit: @Dillberry, I concede that you are correct. There are ways to do it.
     
  17. power

    power Member

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    bring back the days of PC's that had popped caps everywhere that stopped them working.

    fuckers are too reliable these days. I retired my 7yo PC the other day, not even sure if it was a good move. Is the 9700k impressive? yes, but is it that much better than my 3770k? i don't think i have a good answer for that.

    tbh thank fuck intel are not supporting old OS's going forward.

    end of the day, a thing breaks money appears like magic to replace it.
     
  18. Statitica

    Statitica Member

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    Honestly, no.

    The specs I've listed are in machines still being sold here. Most IT outlets here are still selling PCs with win7 OEM. The highest spec laptop in our main office is using a 5 year old Celeron, and cost probably double what it would have in AUS (thanks to a 100% import duty on electronics).

    But this is getting way off topic now.
     
  19. flu!d

    flu!d Ubuntu Mate 16.04 LTS

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    Hence why I haven't replaced my dual X5675's yet.

    Still wouldn't claim Windows 10 is all great though...
     
  20. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    Just checking in to reiterate.

    1. Patch your fucking shit
    2. Don't run EOL/EOS software - because if you do, you can't refer to 1.
    3. If you can transition to linux, its not just a matter of spinning up gentoo and saying "Suck it Lusers!" - this transformation method is a quick trip to the dole queue. If you're arguing in a thread about running Windows 7 for life bruh, chances are you have no clue what your users do, what the business requires of them, the appetite for change - let alone the ability to help them transition successfully and improve business efficiency whilst doing so. Just update to Windows 10 already - or get off my internet.
     
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