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Good corporate wifi?

Discussion in 'Business & Enterprise Computing' started by Cadbury, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I'm with this guy. Hardware that gets locked when the support agreement expires doesn't get bought by me or any place I work for.
     
  2. DiGiTaL MoNkEY

    DiGiTaL MoNkEY Inverted Monkey

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    I would check Xirrus out. It all comes down to what types of areas you are looking at covering, class of devices, amount of devices, your budget etc etc. Licensing and maintenance plans can factor into your final budget. Plus many more other factors to consider in the scope...
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
  3. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    I too would flip the fuck out about this.
     
  4. gords

    gords Oh deer!

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    The only upside is that hardware warranty is tied to product licensing, so while the product is licensed, the hardware is under warranty. This might be handy in situations where businesses expect hardware to stay working for years and years, with no thought given to purchasing warranties or spares.
     
  5. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    But you're happy to do that with software?

    Why the difference?
     
  6. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    The guy is pretty much a FOSS Zealot - he's probably the last person i'd say is "happy" to do that with software. RMS is probably less compromising than Elvis - but still.

    I guess there is a valid argument though with regards to his affection for GAPPS.
     
  7. PabloEscobar

    PabloEscobar Member

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    It's the same with any *-As-A-Service

    The Meraki stuff is dodgy, because often it's not made clear to the buyer until after the sale, but as with all expenditure.. caveat emptor. I've got no issues at all with subscribing to something that includes hardware "as a service"
     
  8. scips

    scips Member

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    For ease of use/stupid proof/paying for licensing else having paperweights id still rate the aerohives over the meraki. (Aerohive is about $700 for the AP230, then another $300 for 3years licencing)

    Our deploy was pretty much IT hands off, config in the cloud manager (inc radius, vlans, ssids etc) then leave physical install up to the maintenance staff (IT could of completed it in 1/2 the time since we still have all our fingers/braincells).

    LLDP ment it was pretty much just check what port the AP was plugged into, config the vlans, reboot POE (or just reboot the switch if it was late in the day) and it'd pickup the new hostname/IP and config and be ready to go in <5min

    Pushing out new config & updating firmware etc is pretty much a few tick boxes and hitting apply, all super stupid proof.

    For what its worth, we replaced a ubiquiti setup, but didnt really get a chance to gauge how the ubiquiti performed when it wasnt attached to ancient cisco switches, we did have about 4 of the square UAP-AC units and they did seem to suck a hell of a lot less than the circle shaped ones (could of been from how few people used them - 5ghz only on a seperate SSID)
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
  9. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Who says I'm "happy" to do that with software?

    I don't pay Google for software. I pay Google to lease their services. There are obvious trade offs, but the fact that it's near zero effort for me to deal with anything, and I can scale up and down by clicking a button, is worth the leasing conditions.

    If I was *leasing* hardware, then yes, I'm happy to hand it back at the end of the lease. If I've bought and own the hardware, then I can use it as long as I want (and if the support is up, that's fine, I won't come to you when it breaks).

    Software is the same. If I *buy* software, it's mine, and the vendor can fuck off when it comes time to renew if I don't feel like it (again, I won't seek them out for support if I know that to be the case). If I'm leasing it, then so be it. But if I've bought it, it's mine, and they don't get a say in how I run it.

    All of this is why I prefer open source. Not because I'm cheap, but because I want to make it very clear what I'm paying for, and who's in control. I've implemented open source solutions that had a higher up-front dollar cost, but it was very clear i was paying for support (not products), and that I could do whatever the hell I liked with the product as a result.

    Commercial open source isn't about saving money. It's about being in control of what you use, and not being beholden to your vendor. If more companies realised this, you'd have fewer people getting fucked over by idiot vendors.

    On that note, I guarantee you the company I work for has a higher per-person dollar cost of proprietary software than almost anyone on this forum. If I was truly a "FOSS Zealot", I wouldn't be working where I do.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2016
  10. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    I know this - and you know this. Zealot isn't the word, but it was late and i couldn't think of it.

    But I do know that you'll be far more likely to accept a lesser feature set - but FOSS, over a greater feature set with proprietary software. Ultimately I'd say it would come down to whether or not it was fit for purpose and scalable.
     
  11. Aetherone

    Aetherone Member

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    b... bu... but that's where the big profits and salesdroid EOFY bonuses come from :( :shock: :wired: :thumbdn: :p

    FOSS or otherwise, I'm always happiest with small+fast+lean+portable tools that do limited numbers of things *really* well; instead of swiss-army bloatware that tries to do 10,000 things, all of them badly.
     
  12. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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    Yeahhhh, dat UNIX philosophy.
     
  13. NiRdoC

    NiRdoC Member

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    Ruckus all the way! Had them in over a dozen sites without any issues, controlled over VSAT in most of the sites. Also the reliability on the AP's are second to none, especially the external AP's.
     
  14. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Currently deploying Unifi in my installs (domestic and also for the various companies my partner and I are running). Cloud key is a must, but otherwise, works nicely. I hated Unifi prior to the Cloudkey thing. Love it now... Especially love being able to deal with issues remotely, seeing as my deployments are in Aus and the Philippines.


    Wait... You can do that? Don't suppose you have a link for a tutorial? Or am I mis-understanding what you're saying? ie - Are you controlling them from a single Cloud key?

    Z...
     
  15. bugayev

    bugayev Whammy!

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  16. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    Using an on Premise controller here in AU to manage AU, NZ and South Korea. Within the controller software I have created 3 separate sites and have adopted each AP into the correct site. I can then manage each site individually in terms of Networks etc. All sites have to be on the same layer 3 network or be able to route to your controller over layer3, a VPN works fine.

    In fact I go through the U.S over an MPLS then a VPN to talk to South Korea and it works fine.

    As per the link above:

    You'll need to configure your DNS server to resolve 'unifi' to your controller's IP address.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2016
  17. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Thanks

    ..And thanks.

    This'll make life a little easier...

    Z...
     
  18. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Speaking purely for the volume of software I'm responsible for today, the numbers are in reverse. We have far more proprietary software in use here specifically because of extended feature sets, even when competent open source alternatives exist (open source alternatives used commercially by competitors of ours in the same market, so me saying they're "competent" isn't hyperbole).

    I certainly prefer the philosophy of open source, but the pragmatic nature of private industry business overrules philosophical desires.

    With all of that said, I'm seeing a definite trend towards open source in a number of markets lately. Even the biggest nay sayers are changing their tune. I think there'll be an inevitable tipping point where proprietary software becomes the exception. And I won't hide my glee when that happens.
     
  19. Zzapped

    Zzapped Member

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    We are just about to pull the trigger on a 10 Million plus infrastructure project........and the two primary servers this system will utilize are built on.....Ubuntu :)
     
  20. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    We run most things on Linux. But those things tend to be big expensive proprietary things. For us, it's not a case of 100% open source or proprietary head to toe, but a mix of things for any given solution.
     

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