Google Stadia (formerly Project Stream)

Discussion in 'PC Games' started by power, Oct 2, 2018.

  1. jET_M@X

    jET_M@X Member

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    Uhhhhh a beta is usually there to iron out kinks not a full service launch that people have actually paid for.
    This type of mentality is what allows game developers to make half arsed game launches like anthem....hey its a full priced "AAA" beta game launch. Sure there are multiple issues and even gamebreaking bugs but you know what just treat this as a beta and we may fix things eventually.

    That might be great for you as an individual.But for any gamer who invests play time in Stadia games like Destiny 2
    will lose all that progress if they stop their Stadia subscription. ( Or Google cancels Stadia which is also a possibility).


    Agree with others that it's all moot until Stadia launches in Australia. And it will be a different prospect again when the free version launches next year.
     
  2. RnR

    RnR Member

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    A few bits and pieces from /r/Stadia...
    • Playing in Chrome browser you are limited to 1080p. Chromecast Ultra allows 4k rez
    • There may be some issues with HDR. Switching it off makes the image quality much better according to multiple people
    • Deactivating all chrome extensions and making sure hardware acceleration in on can solve lag issues on the Chrome browser
    • Multiple games are streaming at 4k. Some only at 30Hz, but others at 60Hz such as Farming Simulator 19, Gylt, Samurai Showdown
    • Cross platform play is available, but the game devs have to switch it on
    • buddy passes have gone out, and a firmware and software update has gone out a few days ago to Chromecast Ultras
    Lastly this 'review' was interesting...

    After suffering the 80GB dl for Destiny 2 and the crazy amounts of huge Fortnite updates when I played it regularly... I can grok the 'instant on' feature of Stadia.

    One downside... already mentioned earlier in the thread...

    [​IMG]

    upload_2019-11-29_17-12-12.png
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
  3. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    People whine about huge downloads and stadia being better as the games are ready right away but after 5 hours of gameplay you used more data then download of game.

    The only reason to get it that makes sense is not wanting to pay price for console or pc and $50+ per game.

    As for Aussies enjoying it, surely not playing shooters as 250ms+ input lag would be quite unplayable even for super casuals.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
  4. RnR

    RnR Member

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    To be honest I think even the PC version of Destiny 2 suffers from such input lag, but it respects client side hit registration so \o/

    Destiny 2 pvp uses a p2p model... and alot of the times we get matched up with folk from Japan, if not China.
     
  5. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    Ive played destiny 2 and the input response is as snappy as any other shooter. (basically completely dependent on peripherals)

    Now netcode is another story.

    250ms would be very unplayble, download this 25mb simulator and set it to 250ms.. YUCK! even 100ms is nasty

    https://phil-sa.itch.io/input-lag-simulator

    I wish he would create a ping range and simulator that so you can truly see if stadia is for you (say 15ms to 50ms)
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
  6. RnR

    RnR Member

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    From what I can tell over at /r/Stadia, folk are happy playing D2. And that includes folk that have played the PC version. It sounds like in the States and Europe the input lag is minimal. Google's data centers are well connected in the end.
     
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  7. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    Ah yeah, cant see it being an issue if ping is constantly under 20ms.
     
  8. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Yup, that was the whole goal. Move the latency so that "player to player" was low.
     
  9. FerrisXB9R

    FerrisXB9R Member

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    Yeah, had a solid go of D2 and Samurai Shodown today with a mate. Aside from shooters being pus on controllers, it loads and handles great. Honestly ZERO issues. Wierdest thing, is it's streaming video to you right, a la Netflix style? I couldn't get it to pixelate at all. Spinning the controller view etc. Fucking impressive tech tbh (if you've got great unlimited internet).
     
  10. jET_M@X

    jET_M@X Member

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    It will be interesting to see how Stadia performs in crucible when the player population increases. That will be the true test for the game streaming.
     
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  11. walker_2003

    walker_2003 Member

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    Nice where were you when you tried?
     
  12. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    It's not the overall data for me, but the delay. I want to turn on a system and play, not wait for updates.

    Leaving systems on 24x7 so that they can auto update isn't great. Consoles offer low power modes that update in the background, but these don't work all the time. My PS4 notoriously just forgets about life if it's been in low power mode for 1-2 weeks - which happens because working dad lyfe. And when I've got so little gaming time on one afternoon of the weekend, I don't want to spend that watching update bars. (Thankfully PS4 allows you to play offline while it updates in the background, but that means no online play and no connectivity which sucks for certain games).

    Pushing all that maintenance to the service provider is one of Stadia's perks. Now, before anyone has a cry, that's not me suggesting Stadia is "better" than anything else. Like everything, there's features, sacrifices, pros and cons. Stadia's sacrifices are well documented in this thread (10+ pages of doom and gloom), but that doesn't mean it has zero benefits. Player-to-player latency was mentioned as a pro (especially across continents where it's likely to beat traditional PC and console gaming on that benchmark alone). But the other one is near zero maintenance - even less than games consoles - while still having the power of a moderate PC.

    I'm a sysadmin by trade, and the very last thing I want to do when I get home is maintain more computers. PC gaming irritates me with endless updates, maintenance, hardware upgrade planning. There was a day, before marriage and children, where endless hardware tinkering excited me. I don't have time for that shit any more, let alone watching progress bars in my very short downtime. You want to know who are a very likely market demographic of Stadia? Busy working parents. We've got the money (we don't cry like poor 20-somethings about the price of things, we don't only buy games on the Steam summer sale for single-digit dollars), but we don't have any of the spare time for fart-arsing around with all the stuff that surrounds gaming but isn't playing games.
     
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  13. bart5986

    bart5986 Member

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    Stadia must be doing something right.

    I've had a lot of people talk to me about it and how they really want to play once its in Australia, and this is coming from people that own things like macbooks and other things that could never play a game properly.

    There is a lot of potential if they get all the issues out of the way.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    power

    power Member

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    filthy casuals.
     
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  15. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Here we go. 13 pages in, and this thread finally calming down enough to see that OCAU's specialised audience doesn't represent "the average gamer".

    Amazing what a bit of calm reflection can do, rather than knee-jerk reaction.

    Like it or not, they out number us by an order of magnitude.

    OCAU's continued stand point of "we hate it therefore it will fail" followed by "oh shit, it's making money" is almost to the point where you could write a text book on it.
     
  16. OP
    OP
    power

    power Member

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    anyone with half a brain can tell that publishers have been trying to get services like this off the ground essentially since the dawn of gaming.

    why do people think the big players are gobbling up developers like there's no tomorrow, because once streaming is established (and they are all betting now that it will be soon) publishers go extinct who don't make their own content.

    They will follow the cable tv model to the letter. You will sub and get i dunno some mmo channel, sports channel, something like that.

    the possibilities are endless and the live service model is only going to grow - the big question is timing. All tech companies have been waiting for the infrastructure to be in place for a bloody long time.

    Microsoft, Google and Amazon will rule the gaming world. Nintendo who are notoriously hopeless will continue to do what they do and your EA's and Activisons like the cockroaches they are will continue to exist. This is why most publishers are getting into storefronts.

    The future is here and all the online service attempts we've had before have been trying and failing to catch that wave - 2020 will be a landmark year in gaming but not for the reasons many think (PS5/XBSc).
     
  17. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Look bigger picture. *Much* bigger picture.

    Independent content creators are vanishing. Take a look in the news at what book publishers in the US are attempting to do with copyright. Look at Disney and Netflix buying up everything (Netflix acquired 3 non-DC/Marvel comic book publishers last year, which barely made the news because it's not DC/Marvel, but it happened). Look at the fact that every boutique VFX studio is closing and VFX artists are all moving in-house to big studios. Look at the fact that if you're a recording artist not under the umbrella of a massive record label you'll never get exposure. Look at free-to-air TV dying and big publishers all making content in house themselves.

    And yeah, you can point to counter examples here and there. House House made a cute game about a goose. Woo. That indie music band took off for one summer. Hooray. Dendy are doing an independent film festival with two Aussie films. Huzzah. Added together, they're not even a rounding error on the international budgets of the big players.

    Look bigger picture again - people are bored. We're all miserable and offended and shitty. We all work longer hours for less money. We have everything we need and nothing we want. How do we fill the hole? A constant churn of new entertainment. How does that get achieved? Not through independent sources - not any more. It's all now finely polished and made to a formula based on what marketing research says is the nice, homogeneous average. Basic bitches everywhere are "screaming" at how glorious it all is.

    It may sound defeatist, but trying to fight this is impossible. Precisely because it's bigger than gaming. This is literally how everything is delivered today - mass production at enormous scale. If you don't like "average", be prepared to give up everything you once loved about your particular hobby or interest, no matter what it is.

    I think that plenty of business/marketing people get this. Gamers, film buffs, musos and others all seem to have their head in the sand. Whether that's because the latter group don't want to acknowledge the change, or whether it's because they're all too busy in their echo chambers to step outside and see what's happening, I don't know. But I've been bleating this for years to a largely deaf audience it seems. It's saddening just how many people will find this shift "rapid and surprising" when the writing has been on the wall for years.

    What I do know is this - the retro forums are going to be busier than ever in 5-10 years.
     
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  18. bart5986

    bart5986 Member

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    I didn't know I represented everyone else :Paranoid:

    I've been quite positive to Google Stadia from the start so I'm a little confused from your comment.

    I think you are taking a shift/fad and turning it into doomsday.

    Before Steam took off with its indie gaming, it was a tiny market. Its completely exploded since then.

    Indie developers being bought out is bad, but also promotes new indie developers to start. (its not great but its something)

    The whole formula, marketing bla bla thing has been going on for a long time, and it simply shifts with the time.

    You are essentially an old man yelling at kids for the music they like, and how the bands are all terrible compared to X. I do agree with you to some degree, most games are garbage and so are the companies, but we also have a lot of quality games in the mix as well, and many of those are indie developers. And I admit I'm simply complaining about the garbage that young kids like, and how I still think I'm into whats "cool"

    Also your comment about retro? I doubt it.

    Your own words describe a scenario that I think mean that retro gaming is going to die even more so then it already has. "Basic bitches" are not interested in retro games unless a big company repackages the game, ruins it, and then releases it on mobile.

    Companies even more so don't like retro gaming unless there is a lot of money to be made, and its getting harder and harder for retro gaming to exist unless you have a strong IT Background with all the emulators, roms, huge CPU/GPU requirements, game cracking etc, young people simply don't do that anymore.

    The only thing you'll see on retro gaming outside that is linustechtips or something making some $10,000 emulation rig on a virtual machine with 500TB using all sorts of random stuff and all of his followers will be "cool" and then move onto the next video.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2019
  19. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Fair call. I was commenting more on the tone of the thread than you specifically. But you posted lots of fun discussion, so let's run with it.

    Two parts there, and I disagree with both:

    Part 1: "fad" - I don't think it's a fad. I think big business controlling most (not all, but the vast majority) of our entertainment is the new norm. Music, TV and movies are there already. Games are getting closer and closer (if not already there in some respects).

    Part 2: "doomsday" - I don't agree with this. Not only do I not hate "big business entertainment" (I love superhero films, I quite enjoy many triple A games), but I think it lends itself to producing content we otherwise couldn't see without their budgets (nobody's making Avengers films or games like RDR2 on indie budgets).

    Again, don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I'm identifying the market change, not arguing against it. My comments are merely that a lot of people are trying to fight the tide, instead of embracing it. Fighting it won't stop it when the sheer money we're talking about here dwarfs everything.

    I feel you've confused what I'm saying here too. Retro gaming is more popular than ever, but I still wouldn't call it mainstream. And that's not what I meant above - I'm not suggesting that the Average Joe / "Basic Bitch" will get into it. What I'm suggesting is that for niche interest groups like OCAU, our little Retro section will get more attention within this community once mainstream gaming shifts away from PCs, when more and more people of the 20-30 year old age group here in 2019 find themselves at odds with modern gaming (much like the retro section is packed full of 40-50 year olds now, for the same reasons).

    Many folks in our retro section love tinkering with hardware. And I think hardware tinkering is going to dramatically downscale in years to come (it already is - modern PCs are almost plug and play / paint by numbers compared to the complexity of just a few short decades ago). Folks who got a kick out of that side of things are going to want to keep that kick going. Today's "retro" is merely yesterday's "current", after all.

    So that comment wasn't about retro taking off as "big business". Again, just that niche groups like ours here aren't going to find a lot of satisfaction in where the mainstream is headed (and already aren't - this thread is clear proof).

    And once again, I personally don't consider any of that a bad thing. I'm quite excited to see where gaming is going, but I'm also very content with current, "patient" and old gaming too. I split my gaming time pretty much 50/50 between modern Triple-A stuff and retro stuff, with no real allegiance to either. It's all fun, and all worth my time. And even if things end up going in a direction I don't like, that's fine. There's literally more old stuff floating around than I can play in a single lifetime, so I'm good either way.
     
  20. bart5986

    bart5986 Member

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    Based on the increased size of the gaming market I would say its even more dead then ever. Once you exclude the older crowd its almost non existent.

    The closest I've come to seeing young people playing something retro are people who use emulators on playretrogames.com or similar, which I don't really count.
     

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