Hammer drill vs normal drill

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by kripz, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. kripz

    kripz Member

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    Thinking of getting a 18v brushless hammer drill, the hammer can be turned off so is it essentially the same as a normal drill? Is the torque and max RPM the same? Is there anything im over looking?
     
  2. MiloVasic

    MiloVasic Member

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    Pretty much yes, most have the "no hammer option"
    As far as what I bought... I bought the Ryobi one hammer instead of the non-hammer and its a bit stronger internals but I believe pretty much the same otherwise.
    Use it all the time, its great.
    If its out of reach, get a cheapy hammer and work from there,
     
  3. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Yes, you can "ordinary" drill or hammer drill. I don't know the answer to your other question, but I have an el cheapo and it works better than I was expecting. The better quality/more expensive have better longevity and you can use them for longer periods without letting them cool, but the low-end still work (in my experience)
     
  4. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    being using the same Makita set since 2011 not everyday but when i use it.. i use the crap out it... also depends on the type of work you are doing with it quality of the bits...... brick, concrete and such...

    I mostly use my Separate rotary hammer on anything, save my Driver/ hammer for day to day stuff

    FYI there is a whole drill discussion here.. old thread but still useful.. http://forums.overclockers.com.au/showthread.php?t=1135534
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2017
  5. bryn

    bryn Member

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    it will be slightly heavier. very useful to have however.
     
  6. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    Yes, you're paying for a feature that's going to be pretty much useless.
    Had the same argument with a salesperson at Bunnings a month ago.
    TBH even the "brushless" feature isn't worth much for the casual user. All it means is the motor is a tad more efficient so you'll get a bit more life out of the battery. Unless you're a tradie you'll not notice the difference. I've got an ancient Black & Decker cordless drill. Time for its second set of NiCd batteries. Brushes are fine even after over 30 years of intermittent use.

    One feature that I would look for is a dual speed gearbox.
     
  7. cbb1935

    cbb1935 Guest

    I've got two of the Ryobi One+ Hammer Drills... both work great. Really nicely weight balanced, and decent enough power for everything around the house.
     
  8. psychobunny

    psychobunny Member

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    hammer drill will probably be ok for light masonry, but doesnt come even close to the performance of a rotary hammer type of drill by miles, so if your plan is to do lots of masonary drilling, a hammer drill is not the tool for you

    regarding brushless: if they are the same price, go brushless, otherwise I use the rule of 50c per use-day in a year (so if brushless costs $50 more, it means that i'll only go for it if i'll use it in a diy capacity for 100 days or more in a year)

    If you are using these tools in a trade capacity then you should be buying a rotary hammer drill for masonry, a normal drill and an impact driver as the time you will save using the correct tools will pay themselves off
     
  9. booksacool1

    booksacool1 Member

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    With cordless drills you need to look at the torque figure. Crappier drills won't bother to quote one so stay away if you can't find it. But you can't go wrong with a 18v brushless drill from a reputable manufacturer. Make sure you get one with a 2-speed gearbox.

    The hammer function is usually a waste of time, I've never had much luck with them. The hammering action just isn't powerful enough. For any serious work with hard materials you need a rotary hammer drill.
     
  10. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Another +1 for getting an actual rotary hammer drill if you want to drill into concrete.

    Bricks or something the hammer function will work fine but that's about it.

    Most cordless drills will do whatever you want though.
    Also, if you're looking for something for screwing screws, bolts etc, strongly recommend the impact driver. Really, a cordless drill and a cordless impact driver are a great combo.
     
  11. ShadowBurger

    ShadowBurger Member

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    I have a Makita 18V cordless that takes the current model of battery that is interchangeable between all their tools. Excellent bit of kit. THe batteries and the way the charger works is excellent. It has a two speed gearbox which is invaluable when I use bigger drill bits into steel.
     
  12. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    If it's just for odd jobs around the home the Ozito gear is OK and cheap and now has a 5 year warranty. I've got one of their latest and greatest and it seems OK. Keyless chuck with good run-out. Dual speed gearbox and (useless) hammer option.

    Only two complaints:

    It has a light, quite useful except it only comes on when you pull the trigger. What idiot thought that was a grand idea.

    Like all cordless drills it doesn't have enough RPMs for drilling pilot holes into serious hot rolled steel. Tip: If you have to drill into this kind of stuff a good drill bit makes more difference than what's driving it.

    I've also got two of the $30 Ozito cordless screwdrivers with a bag of 1/4" hex drive bits. Having two is great when there's a lot of holes to be drilled and countersunk.
     
  13. cbb1935

    cbb1935 Guest

    Just remember a drill is only as good as it's drill bits.

    Nothing like a good (expensive but quality) set of drill bits.
     
  14. StratosFear

    StratosFear Member

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    I picked up a cheap rotary hammer drill the other day

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/201677792481?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT

    Came to $60 with the ebay 20% off sale. Drilled a few holes so far and it's true what everyone says. A rotary hammer drill makes a standard hammer drill look like a child's toy.

    I didn't want to spend too much as I already have two impact drivers, a cordless drill and a hammer drill. But I have brick walls at home so often have to drill into brick to hang things. So for $60 I'm pretty happy. Came with a carry case as well.

    It's back up to $75 but still almost half the price of the next cheapest at bunnings.
     
  15. rainwulf

    rainwulf Member

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    Cordless drills that have "hammer" facility aren't actually hammer.

    They only use a ridged disk that the spindle rides on to provide a "vibration" that can kinda help with drilling soft concrete.

    A proper hammer drill actually has a pneumatic hammer on the end of the spindle that can drill concrete at LEAST 10 times fast then a basic little hammer drill.

    If you doubt this, hire a hilti hammer drill and then try drilling concrete. They go through it like cake. Its ridiculous. I nearly got a hardon the first time i used a hilti to drill through a concrete wall. They use special bit type called SDS that are specifically designed for hammer drills, as they are part chisel, part drill.

    I have drilled through concrete faster then i have drilled through wood.
     
  16. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    Yes, from my experience using the top shelf pneumatic hammer drills on concrete they tend to pull the bit in something fierce which can be a bit intimidating.

    The most difficult material I've had to put holes in is fibrous cement sheet such as Hardiplank as it's soft, compressible and very abrasive. Even tungsten carbide is worn away by it. For largish holes (~100mm) in awkward places (eaves) I've finally found a solution, a piloted diamond core drill. Go slow and spray water onto the bit from a spray bottle. You don't really need to buy anything expensive, the cheap ones made in China are good enough.
     
  17. psychobunny

    psychobunny Member

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    if uyou can remove the sheet there are much better options, like punching a hole if its the thin stuff
     
  18. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    lol, the memories of my first are very similar to this. I think after struggling with a hole in concrete for some dynabolts, hole 1 of 16 with my hammer drill going to town. Got annoyed with it, remembered my FIL had an actual rotary. He dropped it off and I'd drilled all holes faster than I'd drilled the 1cm depth I had with the 'Hammer' Drill I had.
     
  19. OP
    OP
    kripz

    kripz Member

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    i dont think ill ever use the the hammer feature but my logic was that for $30 more, it might be better built because it has the hammer.
     
  20. miicah

    miicah Member

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    No, it's just another thing that can break.
     

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