Hammer drill vs normal drill

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by kripz, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. rainwulf

    rainwulf Member

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    As long as its a proper hammer SDSS hammer drill you will be fine.
     
  2. tunagirll

    tunagirll Member

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    I used to sell these for a living.

    Drill Driver - will drill steel and timber and drive screws.

    Hammer drill driver - will drill steel, timber and masonry and drive screws. They have more power but the trade off can be a bit heavy and hard on screws.

    Hammer drill with keyed chuck - mainly an older version of the above.

    Hammer drill with SDS - masonry only.

    Hammer drill with SDS and chisel function - masonry only, also chisels (setting to stop rotation)

    Today's 18V and 28V hammer drills in decent brands (Hilti, Ramset, Milwaukee, Panasonic) perform just as well as corded 2kg hammer drills. Hilti and Ramset in particular do a very decent job of chiselling as well for a cordless.

    For home handyman use any modern 18V hammer drill driver will do you quite well :thumbup:
     
  3. psychobunny

    psychobunny Member

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    Unless you are saying it is always in 'hammer' mode then i disagree with this, many of them have a standard chuck that can be added which then allows you to use normal drill bits and just drill in a normal fashion

    eg https://www.bunnings.com.au/chuck-key-dynalink-13mm-w-sds-plus-adaptor-fittng_p6275815
     
  4. connico

    connico Member

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    Home users should also consider lower voltages tools as they are much more affordable and much more compact...

    I've supplemented my 14.4 and 18v Pana's with 12v Milwaukee and have been pleasantly surprised in both power, torque and battery life... due to there compact nature its much easier to lug around the house and on to the roof...
     
  5. SimParadox

    SimParadox Member

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    So I went cheap and bought an Ozito Hammer Drill kit https://www.bunnings.com.au/ozito-1500w-sds-rotary-hammer-drill_p6290261

    I've used it to get the tiles off the bathroom floor, chisel away the screed and even chisel away some of the concrete slab. It's hard work and the chisel has an annoying tendency to slightly rotate (yes the chisel bit is mounted properly, the internal plate or something seems to be the problem), but otherwise I've got to say it has been well worth it. Much easier than doing it with hand tools (i.e. chisel and hammer).

    I've not actually used it as a drill yet, so can't report on that aspect.
     
  6. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    ANYTHING would be easier than doing that task by hand. Just how tough it is depends on the type of tiles and how the tiles are affixed to the wall / floor. If they're old school cemented on good luck no matter what you use.
    Wear serious protective clothing. We had multiple injuries from flying shards of tile.
     
  7. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Fir enough, I've had these sorts of tools for years for work, and we're renovating our new place in Manila, so I've bought a Bosch Blue cordless hammer and impact driver just for there. I've been installing all sorts of stuff, soap holders, racks, towel hangers and shampoo dispensers in the bathroom alone, taking the bed apart when we were getting the floors done...

    Heck, even the tradies there end up using my tools (I usually insist, as they usually have crap tools - was quite amusing seeing the look on his face when I handed him my cordless hammer drill. He was waiting for his corded drill to "cool - down". Sadly, even crappy tools are expensive there (my Bosch stuff is double), which is mad seeing as the workers earn so little). He was looking quite dismissive of my cordless until he actually felt it in his hands, his eyes opened wide and realised it was a proper tool. He used it for the rest of the day, and half the next day on the one charge.

    I guess it depends how motivated you are for your own projects, too. I'll happily grab my tools to hack into a chair, because I want to mount my HOTAS to the arms of an office chair.

    I'd actually agree that if it is not something you are likely to do much of, you're better off hiring a very good tool for the day, than buying a shit one.

    Z...
     
  8. Brooa

    Brooa Member

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    I keep one of these behind the drivers seat of the work ute and it is a lifesaver. Yes the spinning chisel can be frustrating, but it happens a lot more if you are not applying even pressure. Apart from that i find it works for you because it moves as need be rather than bouncing you around.

    For me i use the following:
    makita (no chisel) or Cheap ozito SDS as above for >6mm Brick, any size concrete, chiseling (wider bit then it comes with is a godsend for tiles etc)
    Bosch or ozito keyless hammer drill for <6mm brick, glass/tile, steel and wood
    18v makita percussive cordless (10+yo so now looking at hitachi/makita/bosch) for small drilling, screws etc
    FULL BOAR Demo hammer for the serious chiseling

    I do want an impact driver, though most are just way to strong for my liking. I prefer the gentle touch of the cordless, but the weight is annoying.
     
  9. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Brute force & optimism

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    I just got a nice invoice payment, went to Bunnings for some bits'n'pieces and impulse-splurged on the DeWalt (Black & Decker) brushless 18V "XR" rattle gun, model DCF887N.
    $229 (tool only, no battery) which is a bit ouchy, no doubt I could have found it cheaper online, but I've needed an impact driver for ages and I'm currently on a job that requires speedboring lots of cables paths through timber joists, so what the hell. Tax write-off eh? :D

    I fucking love this thing man. Very light and compact, goes for a good while on the little 1.3Ah batteries that came with my DeWalt drill driver kit.
    Has 3xLED worklights around the chuck that are actually bright enough to help you see what you're doing in dark spots.
    205Nm max torque, 3250 max rpm, 3800 max ipm. Comes with belt clip and magnetic bit holder.
    But the coolest thing - in respect of the comment above - is that it has a speed switch with three settings.
    On "1" it acts like a cordless driver, with just enough torque to make a bugle head screw bite down flush in soft material (gyprock, dressed pine, etc.)
    "2" and "3" bring progressively more torque/impact for heavier jobs.
    Great tool, highly recommended, though probably overkill for the home handyman.

    You can get also get the lower-spec brushed version in a kit with the same driver drill that I already have (also a good reliable tool) plus 2 batteries and charger for about the same price as the brushless model by itself.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  10. nav

    nav Member

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    This is a great video! It explains the concept perfectly :thumb up:

    -nav.
     
  11. Ratzz

    Ratzz Member

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    My corded Ryobi, which I only own since despite the hype 240v is always better than 18v, has a faux 'hammer' function. I've not tried drilling into strong concrete like a foundation or floor with it, but it eats brick and mortar easily.

    I've used it recently on some terracotta garden stuff and actually found it did better with a masonry bit and the hammer turned off.. terracotta shatters if you start hammering, but drills fine with a masonry bit. It is necessary however to drill from both sides, the exit hole shatters and you finish up like a bullet wound.. small entry, large exit.

    To do this I use a much smaller masonry bit first, which shatters the opposite side only a little, then using that hole as a guide, drill one side halfway then drill from the other side instead, which cures that issue.

    Sad to report though, all of my cordless (Ryobi One all the way !!) stuff, which gets much more use, still works perfectly, but the corded Ryobi 'hammer' drill now starts and stops with an audible 'thunk' (with or without hammer) which definitely sounds like the damn thing is about to die.

    I inherited a proper DeWalt Hammer Drill which will eat just about anything faster than a flock of buzzards, but its sheer bulk and weight make it inconvenient for the small jobs. I don't even know if I can stop it from rotating, I've never tried. I might have to check it out.

    For lifting tiles in my old QLD house I used a cheap air chisel. The only way to go IMO. The basic problem with that is they use a lot of air.. you are looking at at least 700-1000 bucks for a compressor capable of keeping the air up to it. Unless you want lots of air tools (which are absolutely fabulous) that's not really an economic solution, and unless you plan on using it a lot, its nowhere near as practical as a simple plug in 240v or a cordless 18v of course.

    If you only want to lift tiles from a single room or two, it might be worth hiring a decent compressor and air chisel for the day, the amount of work it will save you would be totally worth it. Of course this means you pay money for a tool but it doesn't stay in your collection, which sucks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  12. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    Terracotta is similar to glass; use diamond core drills. Unless you can find ones with a pilot bit you do need to keep the work piece and drill aligned and even then..... Best to use a drill press if possible.
     
  13. clonex

    clonex Member

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    if large area you cant go past a jackhammer with proper attachements for lifting up tiles.
     
  14. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    one month later.. still not sure what the OP has done.. anyone of us who owned said tools could have gone over and helped the poor bugger out by now....:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

    :Pirate::thumbup:
     
  15. OP
    OP
    kripz

    kripz Member

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    Well one questions is answered, now it's which brand should i buy in terms of reliability, warranty, other skin availability:lol:

    I'm waiting for EOFY sales, hopefully some 5.0ah brushless battery combos go on sale.
     
  16. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    that is a very subjective thing.. Brand that is.. I love My Makita Kit... others prefer other brands.. try each one in store.. or find someone each and try on something small
     

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