HDD dropped from BIOS and making this sound

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting Help' started by zbone, Jan 28, 2019.

  1. zbone

    zbone Member

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    Few days ago this drive dropped and irregularly makes this sound: https://instaud.io/3epf

    How dead is it? I can't recall if I have anything important there and wonder if anything is salvageable.
     
  2. ruffdayz

    ruffdayz Member

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    That noise is either:
    1. A stuck read write head/actuator arm.
    2. A seized spindle motor.
    3. An actuator arm that can't find sector 0 / park (unlikely as I don't hear any clicking / clunking of the arm).

    Either of those issues (1 or 2) a data recovery company can probably resolve on the cheaper side of things (cheap for data recovery company). If it's touched the platter and scratched it though, that can be a lot bigger issue to resolve.

    People have tried solutions from chucking the HDD in the freezer to loosen the head from the platter, to disassembling the drive (not recommended without a clean room and platter tool).

    What state are you in, and what would you be wiling to pay to get such data back?

    crag_v runs a data recovery company and might be able to give you a better / more precise idea of the problem, associated costs, and chance of recovery... or even something you can try at home.

    Until he gets back to you I'd disconnect the drive and avoid powering it up, as if by some chance the head is scraping the platter, that can do serious damage to the drive and hinder data recovery.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Unfortunately, he's not doing it any more.
     
  4. ruffdayz

    ruffdayz Member

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    Bugger... he might still have some valuable advice or be able to accurately know what that sound means.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    zbone

    zbone Member

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    Thanks, I suspected something of that nature.
    I am not prepared to pay for that data a lot as everything really important is on backup schedule, but I can't recall what was there apart from old games and related stuff of mostly sentimental value, which would be nice to have back at sub $100 price, but with data recovery service charges it's a pipe dream. I am in WA.

    Would be grateful for any DIY at home tips though.
     
  6. garnet

    garnet Member

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    try the zip bag/freezer trick
     
  7. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I found this interesting. It explains what's going on inside and when some of the "home remedies" might work
     
  8. ruffdayz

    ruffdayz Member

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    It's not a cick of death issue though. Good link though.

    If its a stuck head - you may be able to move it.
    If its a seized spindle motor - replacement is your only option unless it can be freespun by hand.

    I'd maybe get a few quotes first. I've heard of repairs for around your budget, and I've heard of repairs 20 x your budget.

    If you want DIY:
    a) try freezing the hard drive (put it in a snap lock bag first though). Leave it for 24-48 hours, remove and attempt to power up. NOTE, it *could* damage the drive more.
    b) Failing that (or the heavy handed option), is to crack the drive open. You can still get data off an open drive, but you need VERY minimal dust and to be quick. When you crack it open try to move the spindle by hand (first check if he actuator arm is across the drive (if it is it means the heads have failed to park)). If the spindle moves freely, or cracks and frees up, try powering it up. If the spindle is locked tight you can try loosening the spindle motor and see if it freeturns. If it doesn't it's completely seized. You CAN swap spindle motors but its a MASSIVE job and not for beginners.
    c) if the spindle spins freely, try moving the actuator arm. It should move freely. If it doesnt it's a stuck actuator arm. If it cracks and frees up, return to the position it was and try again (it may lose sector 0 and have a head crash like the above or may work). If it's seized solid it CAN be repaired but is a MASSIVE job and not for beginners (you need platter alignment tools, etc).

    SIDE NOTE: How old is it, and is it a Seagate? Seagate I thought a while back did free data recovery on some models of their drives if they crapped out.
     

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