Heavy duty dust filter mod - Fractal Design Core 1000

Discussion in 'Modding' started by Mickatroid, Nov 15, 2014.

  1. Mickatroid

    Mickatroid Member

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    It is time for a new shed/workshop computer. My socket A Athlon shed system, built in 2001ish, is just too slow. I want a computer that is fast, not to big, not too loud and that still has some room in it for HDDs and stuff. It also has to be very dust resistant and heat tolerant. Key parts are

    • Fractal Design Core 1000
    • Scythe Big Shuriken 2 Rev. B
    • Gigabyte GA-H97M-D3H Motherboard (microATX)
    • Intel Core i5 4690S
    • G.Skill Ripjaws X F3-1600C9D-16GXM 16GB
    • Samsung 840 EVO Series 250GB SSD
    No video card. The TDP of the 'S' CPU is 65W so keeping it cool will not require huge air flows. Water cooling seemed over the top and didn't make things that much easier, I still needed decent air filtering. So, how to do the air filtering? An automotive pod filter. I saw one used in a computer on OCAU years ago and have been keen to try it ever since. This may make this thread a worklog, I leave it to the moderators :)

    First, I got some particle board and made a mount using a milling machine with a router bit in it and a hole saw. I painted it black. Next I fitted in a car pod filter mounting part I bought from Repco I think. A fairly small one. The routed out square give the air some space to spread out to the 120mm fan size. I also lets it fit comfortably over the raised honeycomb grill on the side of the case.

    Just inside the mouth of the shifting spanner there is a hole for an additional fixing screw, a standard wood screw goes through a piece of aluminium flat bar, through the case side and into the particle board. I specially made the particle board mount tall so I could put this screw in for extra strength. It was a good idea, the case sides are quite thin sheet metal and it adds a lot of support. The mount is also held in place by the four fan fixing bolts.


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    Fan on with a silicon vibration mount. In this mod it's a seal.


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    Case closed up with pod filter fitted :) It came with a stainless hose clamp too. It is probably not necessary but I will put it on to hold the pod filter onto the metal mount.


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    I powered up the fan and the air flow is very good through the pod. I think even with a slow front exhaust fan and the PSU fan I should still have a case that doesn't suck air in anywhere other than through the filter. If not I will turn off the front exhaust fan (I turned it around, it was originally a filtered intake but the filter was hard to get at and not particularly industrial.

    There is a shelf under my bench that has some room off the side of it so that the filter can hang off the edge and be entirely out of the way :)

    The rest of the build should be unremarkable. Thought this bit was worth sharing. Been a long time since I did any case modding of note. Lots of fun.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2014
  2. rainwulf

    rainwulf Member

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    If you can, try and hook up some tubing and put some more filters on. Sure it may flow fast now but as soon as the dust builds up it will slow down, and the fan wont be able to pull air through it. Those fans arent very good at pulling air.

    I would do the following:
    1: Use a much bigger filter, or more of them hooked up with PVC tubing.
    2: Use a squirrel cage fan or a centrifugal blower, they have a much better suction and can pull air through anything.

    Its a good idea though, pod filters like that are cheap!
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Mickatroid

    Mickatroid Member

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    I know what you mean. Stacking fans increases pressure too (as XF Falcon did in that 5 year old post).

    Truth is the airflow is immense. Far far more than I need for the build I am doing. I expect to be able to keep the filter pretty clean with a vacuum cleaner.

    I also considered building a full box around the filter and blowing the air into it (much more effective than suction for these fans). Turns out it's just not necessary.
     
  4. partybear

    partybear Member

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    Thats a pretty sweet shed computer.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Mickatroid

    Mickatroid Member

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    When you only update them once in every 10 years it's OK to go a little overboard :) This one should work out at well under $100 per annum over its life time.

    It does a lot of work. Web browsing etc, video and TV, audio are all pretty normal but I also use it for running loudspeaker and crossover engineering software, spreadsheeting etc. It will eventually have a spinny type HDD in it too for backup. I have 3 cat6 cables running out to the shed so sending stuff out there for safekeeping is pretty easy. Might even get a dual gigabit NIC one day.

    EDIT: For some of the software I will running XP in a VM too. Might also end up controlling some CNC gear etc. etc.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2014
  6. OP
    OP
    Mickatroid

    Mickatroid Member

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    Ordered the MOBO etc. etc. today. Have been looking at silicon pipe at SuperCheap too. Seems pretty easy to move the filter around/put on a monster one in another location if I want.
     
  7. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    If you are prepared to clean it with a vacuum cleaner, you could just use a standard flat computer air filter. You know, the ones that are fitted as standard to most cases. :lol:
     
  8. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

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    For the age of the pc, old skool might have been the way to go:

    [​IMG] or

    [​IMG]
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Mickatroid

    Mickatroid Member

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    That Chrome intake would look AWESOME. :leet:

    Not sure what you mean about the age of the PC, it's a brand new build.

    I seriously considered a big flat circular filter too. However, I believe trad paper filters do not flow nearly as freely as hipster pod filters...

    I was a bit constrained with this build on where to put the filter. Not a huge amount of height under my bench. I am thinking though that my next build for the house might have some high spec filtering on it too.

    I am attracted to the idea of using an inline filter box so that the fans can blow rather than suck. I don't need much airflow for my shed project with a TDP of well under 100 watts all told. It is easy to triple that though with some overclocking and a video card or two.
     
  10. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

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    Yeah sorry, was thinking about what you started off with, the Athlon, rather than what you have built, and I got a bit carried away. :lol:

    Well, by the time you're up for another rebuild, you could say it is 'period correct' :D:D

    Pod filter box: I'm not sure of the diameters, but would some pvc piping be big enough to fit over the pod, then make a flange to mount the fan? Paint it up when finished and you have spent very little.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Mickatroid

    Mickatroid Member

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    I think it would be possible with 150mm pipe. Elbows would be very helpful too.
     

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