Home Video - 25/29.97 fps PAL/NTSC AVI/MP4/X264 - Help!

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by Andres, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. Andres

    Andres Motor Admin

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    I'm starting to take a few videos on various devices (LG G4 / OMD EM5 / Sony RX100) of our two young kids and I want to be able to pull them together into videos to share with family and for looking back at in the future.

    What I know:
    - We live in Australia - which is a PAL region (well it was back in the old days)
    - LG G4 and OMD EM5 take video at 29.97fps (ie 30fps, which is NTSC)
    - Sony RX100 takes video at 25fps
    - Video looks a little funny if the video editing/rendering is done at a different rate to the original footage.
    -h264 is better than MP2 for quality:size ratio

    What I don't know:
    - If i'm generally going to share online, what do I aim for? (Ie YouTube)
    - If I want to pick a format and stick with it, should I shoot in something that's PAL compatible (ie 25fps) or does it not matter as new TVs are more flexible with refresh rates etc?

    Adobe Premiere elements didn't mention the difference in video frame rates, but PowerDirector makes a note every time the project frame rate is different from the original footage.

    They are just home videos, so it's no big deal, but any help would be greatly appreciated as I'd rather just get my head around it and do it 'right' from the get go! The main issue is that people/baby's movements looks kinda odd/jerky with the strange framerates.

    A bit more googling suggests it would only be an issue to shoot at 30fps, in a PAL region (Australia) if it was for TV broadcast...which it most certainly isn't. It seems like I'll stick to 30fps and maybe just not use the Sony camera too much for video.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2016
  2. Squeezer

    Squeezer Member

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    Ideally shoot everything at 25fps which is PAL used in AUS and UK/Europe.

    You should be able to change settings in all your devices to this
    and H264 encoded files are pretty standard these days although H265 is starting to appear in some file formats also. Bit problematic as some players dont yet support it.

    If its just for home use then it doesnt matter too much as TVS and PCs will read the frame rate and play accordingly,. Problem is if you mix and match in a video compilation of mixed frame rates
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2016
  3. OP
    OP
    Andres

    Andres Motor Admin

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    What about (predominantly US) online services, such as YouTube/Vimeo etc? Do they 'up-rate' (for lack of better word) to NTSC frame rates?

    Unfortunately none of my camera let me change the FPS. (Well, they do, but to very different numbers, ie 60/15 fps etc)

    I think as the mobile and OMD are 30fps I'll just stick with that. The Sony barely gets used that much. The only downside I see is possible flickering of lights (but most fluoros are much higher frequency than 50Hz thesedays anyway).
     
  4. mesaoz

    mesaoz Member

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    30fps is will be the easiest in general to use.

    I try to use 60fps for everything where I can as it gives more options in editing.
     
  5. berek

    berek Member

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    Some cams shoot 30/60 some 25/50 (what pal uses). What it shoots and what you output don't have to be the same thing. What you playback has no bearing on how you do it i.e. vlc, media player can all play back 24/25/30/50/60/120 etc.
    When you create a timeline in the editing software it does so at 1 speed. So the strangeness you see is the different speeds playing back either too slow or too fast.
    The flickering you see from lights is the a common issue and is resolved by changing the shutter speed of the to be slightly higher or lower than the refresh rate of the lights.
     
  6. Squeezer

    Squeezer Member

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    Rule of thumb is the 180 degree shutter rule. SHoot at 25 fps shutter speed = 2x25 = 1/50th sec. Shoot at 30fps and shutter speed is 1/60th. Light WILL be an issue as our electricity SHOULD be 50Hz, although even at 1/50th some lights still flicker.


    Sound is an issue if using mixed fps speeds in footage as some will be sped up or slowed down hence pitch changes. Shooting mixed modes is BAD okay
     
  7. apsilon

    apsilon Member

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    Grave dig! Just getting into video for family stuff and am stuck on this NTSC/PAL and frame rate thing. I can have PAL 25/50 or NTSC 30/60 on my camera. I'm aware of the rule Squeezer mentions above and when I try and follow this with PAL 25p and shutter set to 1/50 I can just see flicker on monitors, haven't tried anything other than LED lights yet but might be present with fluros as well?. If I change to NTSC 30p and shutter 1/60 I don't see the flicker. Is this normal as I've seen some people saying the reverse (ie they can see flicker on NTSC 30 but not PAL 25)? Trying to Google this stuff but so much is US centric and I'm not sure if it all applies. Does it even matter? I'm thinking NTSC is a better solution to eliminate the flicker but looking for some reassurances as that's counter intuitive to our Aust = PAL history that I grew up with.
     

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