Homebrew.

Discussion in 'Geek Grog & Homebrew' started by Vindaloo, Feb 27, 2002.

  1. aXis

    aXis Member

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    I finished fermenting this on Friday, cold crashed in a fridge over the weekend and then transferred to a keg for forced carbonation. Final gravity was lower than expected (1009) but not too far off target, bitterness was very agressive though - tastes a bit like a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. Will have to recalculate that for the next brew, not sure where I went wrong but the power outage in the middle of the boil didnt help. I'm going to take it to a homebrew night this Saturday and it will be a little fresh, could have really used some extra time to mellow out.

    On the bright side I was able to do a yeast harvest / yeast wash, clean out the fermenter and then put down a cider using store bought apple juice and tinned strawberries. The intention is to make a rekorderling strawberry & lime clone. It was my first time doing a yeast wash and I took some shortcuts due to laziness, it seemed to work great though and the airlock is bubbling away furiously. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2014
  2. mwil7034

    mwil7034 Member

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    Awesome work let us know how it turns out, the missus would love something similar. I too was looking at washing my next batch, not because its particularly good yeast, just to see how it goes.

    My last few brews have lagged a bit so i got a bubbler and intend to bump up the cell count a bit to see if it counteracts it. Ive had one lagg 48 hours, didnt turn out the best but wasnt infected so dont know if it was poor yeast health or my mashing ;(
     
  3. aXis

    aXis Member

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    If you want to reduce the lag I'd look at increasing the cell count before you pitch into the fermenter - i.e. a yeast starter. They are dead easy to make, just reydrate your yeast packet in a little water first (lower mortality that way) and then add to a malt extract solution. You dont need any more than half a litre in a bottle, shake it well to aerate and then put a loose fitting lid on it. Just be careful about being clean and sterile - eg sanitise the bottle, boil the water / DME before use and then cool back to room temp.

    In a day or two you should have a nice healthy yeast population and a great headstart for your fermenter.
     
  4. Azrael

    Azrael Member

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    I had forgotten about this thread. Ended up getting into 3V in Adelaide, but dont have the room for that here in Melbourne. So i have built a BIAB urn setup from a $60 ebay chinese urn recently, and put an inaugural brew through it last week:
    [​IMG]

    Has a 12" hop bazooka inside, and a false bottom cake airer tray suspended by 316SS welding wire.

    I have an icecream mixer unit to go on top during the mash phase to help with mixing and boost the efficiency, but if that doesnt work ill switch to a recirc system.

    Biggest issue with it is the stupid thermostat not getting to a rolling boil, but the wiring is pretty basic:
    [​IMG]
    and in the end ill control it with a PID for better temp control as well.

    Biggest bummer is now im away for a month and no opportunity to brew again until just before Christmas.
    Good news is that i have a SN Ruthless Rye down in the fermenter bubbling away, dry hop tonight and then keg on Sunday.
     
  5. Iseneye

    Iseneye Member

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    No need to make a starter with dry yeast assuming proper pitching rates for gravity and volume. OG1.05, 5 gallons needs 10g dry yeast which a 11.5g packet is perfect for. The dry yeast has all the nutrients it needs.

    11.5g dry yeast is roughly 200 billion cells. If you're putting this into a 600ml starter the innoculation rate is 320 million cells / ml when it should be between 25-100. Due to the small starter size you're also only increasing the number of cells from 200 billion to 218 billion.

    If you're brewing a larger volume or higher gravity then grow an appropriately sized starter or pitch two packets.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  6. J-C90

    J-C90 Member

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    Get preparred to dump a load of lactose sugar into it - Rekorderling is un-naturally sweet for a cider, there is a lot of post fermentation processing done to it I suspect. You wont get anything near it with a normally fermented cider which tends to turn out very dry.
     
  7. scon

    scon Member

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    Too much lactose will make the cider chalky - so watch that. Not actually many options for making a sweet cider if you're bottling. If you're kegging you can do it however.
     
  8. aXis

    aXis Member

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    Yeah, it will be as dry as buggery and the missus loves her cider sickly sweet. I have used lactose in the past but this time I plan on using Stevia. I'll do a test run by mixing a small quantity in a glass and then scale up to the whole keg. I'll be kegging but I prefer not to use sulfur etc to kill the yeast as then it's a dead product and spoils quickly.

    Also on the topic of lactose, I've had the best results by disolving it in a tiny small amout of water on the stove and then simmering till I achieved light caramelisation - the sweetness increased and it became more soluble. You just have to be careful not to scorch it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2014
  9. Iseneye

    Iseneye Member

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    I keg and have dry cider but I've heard that Stevia can be difficult to get right. Apparently the taste isn't quite right and you only need a small amount for an entire keg. Scaling may be tricky due to the small numbers.

    Another option is to cold condition in the carboy then rack into the keg and keep it cold in the kegerator. Fermentation won't re-start if it's kept cold. You can make it sweet by back sweetening with apple concentrate or rack at 1.01 / 1.02.

    If you're bottling you can stove top pasteurise.
     
  10. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    If you're bottling in glass you can apparently also run it through a hot cycle in a dishwasher to kill off the yeast and stop any further fermenting.
     
  11. J-C90

    J-C90 Member

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    I used to backsweeten my ciders in the keg(I dont mind it dry but I brewed it for the chicks and they cant handle dry cider!) Lactose was better than nothing but I didnt like it much, I found it very hard to dissolve and never tasted quite right, but was better than nothing. Best flavor wise was to add unfermented apple juice back into the keg and keep it cold, but I found it still eventually fermented further even at low temp, just took a lot longer.

    Never tried Stevia or caramalised lactose, they sound promising.
     
  12. Iseneye

    Iseneye Member

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    I tried lactose once and got an infection so never bothered with it since. If I want sweet cider I'll add juice to the glass at drinking time(either concentrate or natural). My favourite is adding blackcurrent syrup - just a small amount to each glass and the syrup stores for a long time in the fridge.
     
  13. aXis

    aXis Member

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    I've backsweetened with juice before and was happy with the results, but that really only gets a medium sweet cider - fine for me but not the missus. For very sweet cider im worried it will dilute too much. Fingers crossed the Stevia works OK but I have a backup plan - looks like this cider will be drunk in one go at a party so I have the option of just using a fermentable sugar a few days before the event and keeping it cold to supress re-fermentation.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2014
  14. Azrael

    Azrael Member

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    [​IMG]
    Well i just bottled/kegged my Ruthless Rye and the dry hop phase has made it come alive, its really nice and earthy with some aromatic punch to it now. That is the hydrometer test vial :) Supposedly it only started out at 1.050 but i think that may have been a false reading with all the hop dregs in the hydrometer cylinder. It certainly feels much more like a 6.x% not a 4.9% beer. Either way still tasty.

    Bottled 12 longnecks of it and put the rest in the keg.

    Also have a AmeriThanksgivingDiosMuertos tonight, Pumpkin Ale and Ruthless Rye with slow cooked pulled pork on the weber for burritos, candied yams, and pumpkin pie.

    Win.

    Will be putting down a SN Torpedo IPA clone tomorrow too.
     
  15. scon

    scon Member

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    So I'm waiting for a batch of yeast to be delivered while planning a 100IBU 100% Brett IPA. Will easily be the most extreme beer I've brewed.
     
  16. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    I've got my final extract brew underway at the moment. Another pacific ale clone, nice easy summer drinker.

    Few more hops to go in tomorrow arv before cc and bottling
     
  17. scon

    scon Member

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    While waiting for all my yeasties (which unfortunately wont arrive till December :() I need to do some serious brewing to get me through Christmas.

    I have been liking rye lately and I'm thinking I might make a beer with heaps of rye. I know roggenbiers have more than 50% but I want to do some kind of IPA. Anyways. Have a gander at this recipe and let me know what you think - My biggest concern is that the wheat malt might be redundant. Thoughts?

    Linky.
     
  18. scon

    scon Member

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    So I put down my 40% Rye IPA, 1.067 SG, 77.5IBU of Chinook and CTZ hops. Cube chilling it now and will kick off ferment tomorrow morning.
     
  19. mmBax

    mmBax Member

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    Been a long time between brews for me.

    Half way through bottling and realised that I hadn't added any sugars for carbonation. :thumbdn:

    Damn I was pissed at myself, poured it all out and started again, added a heap of froth and bubbles so hopefully that doesn't mess things up too much. Should be fine.
     
  20. Iseneye

    Iseneye Member

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    If you added a bunch of froth then it sounds like you've added a bunch of oxygen as well. Perhaps drink them quickly.
     

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