How do 1300/1800 numbers work? Can I buy one? Run my own?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by -Sk3tChY-, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. -Sk3tChY-

    -Sk3tChY- Member

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    I know very little when it comes to Voice and VOIP and I'm looking at setting up a 1300/1800 number for my small business.

    It looks like there are a few providers out there which provide 1300/1800 services and I am considering going with Telecube.

    After doing a little bit of reading/thinking a couple of questions came to mind I was hoping someone could help me clarify before proceeding

    I get that 1300/1800 numbers are just virtual numbers which forward to another number, which has led me to thinking of them much in the same way as domain names.

    Using this domain name analogy:

    1. Domain names require DNS. What do 1300/1800 numbers require?
    2. Am I able to purchase a 1300/1800 number and run my own <insert-service> so I don't have to pay a carrier/third-party? (21c a minute to terminate to a mobile number just sounds like it could really add up!)
    3. I am guessing if I get my 1300/1800 through one of these providers like Telecube, I am limited to which number I can choose and can only use it whilst I am utilizing their services. I have seen www.smartnumbers.com.au, but it's $250 for the cheapest numbers! Is there any cheaper way to get a 1300 number? (Other registrars so to speak)

    I just want to ensure whichever 1300/1800 number I get, I can keep for the life of my business. I would also like to know that should the business grow, I can bring acquire certain hardware/software which will enable me to completely manage the 1300/1800 number to reduce call costs.
    Any info is appreciated. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012
  2. MrvNDMrtN

    MrvNDMrtN Member

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  3. MrvNDMrtN

    MrvNDMrtN Member

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    Oh and to reply to your questions:

    Domain names require DNS. What do 1300/1800 numbers require?
    Telcos run IN(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligent_Network) with similar characteristics to IP, phone number trees.


    Am I able to purchase a 1300/1800 number and run my own <insert-service> so I don't have to pay a carrier/third-party? (21c a minute to terminate to a mobile number just sounds like it could really add up!)
    1300/1800/13 numbers are controlled by a provider. Of course you can forward it to a local FNN and control it from there..


    I am guessing if I get my 1300/1800 through one of these providers like Telecube, I am limited to which number I can choose and can only use it whilst I am utilizing their services. I have seen www.smartnumbers.com.au, but it's $250 for the cheapest numbers! Is there any cheaper way to get a 1300 number? (Other registrars so to speak)

    $250 is cheap already.. then you pay call forwarding costs on top.


    It's much cheaper to contact a reputable visp and get a small block of portable numbers(think the minimum is 100 numbers) and find a decent 10 digit number that is easy to remember..

    e.g 02 9898 0000
     
  4. OP
    OP
    -Sk3tChY-

    -Sk3tChY- Member

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    Thanks for that. I'm assuming though acquiring a TAS number via a Telco like that would be exactly the same as acquiring through a service provider like Telecube?

    I see. I guess what I was getting at is could I simply buy a TAS and set it up in such a way where I didn't have to pay forwarding costs? Or no matter what will I always require some sort of telco/provider?

    Kind of like buying a domain name and rather than using a reigstrars DNS (and having to pay DNS hosting) you just register the domain name with your own DNS server.

    $250 to simply GET a phone number seems a little steep! :p

    Especially when it seems it doesn't provide you with any benefits aside from being able to choose you own numbers!

    Are there any other benefits to using something like smartnumber? :confused:

    You can get one for free by the looks of it when you sign up to Telecube, so I don't see how they justify charging $250 for one.

    I will look into this and compare the costs - Any recommendations?
     
  5. MrvNDMrtN

    MrvNDMrtN Member

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    Im a fan of MyNetFone.

    You can talk to them about your needs and they can quote it all up as well.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    -Sk3tChY-

    -Sk3tChY- Member

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    Thanks mate, they look pretty good.

    A TAS number looks cheaper than going the DID route you suggested earlier tho?
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012
  7. TheWedgie

    TheWedgie Insert Custom Title Here

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    Correct. They all provide the same minimum service - selling you the number, and keeping the IN database uptodate. It's not just their own network that has to be programmed, they have to send requests to all of the other carriers to program their networks to point in the right direction.

    Depends on the contract you get setup - it's been a while since I've dealt with these services (and even then it was from the interconnect side of things) but fairly certain you'll always end up paying something for each individual call that goes through - generally based upon where you're forwarding it, and whether it's a 13x or 18x service.

    Except that the "DNS server" is a multi million dollar Intelligent Network and multiple, very expensive, interconnects with every other telephony carrier's network in the country. Not to mention the international interconnects.

    Really? What's it worth to your business then?
    That's precisely what the SmartNumbers program is about - to be for the more memorable combinations (of both numbers and letters).
    It's a bit of a rort, I agree - but if you don't want to spend the money, then just get 'whatever' number is available.

    As for what to put on your end of the service - definitely suggest looking into an online PBX solution, or rolling your own VOIP setup - that way if you want to do fancy shiz like IVRs/multiple mailboxes/redirections etc, then it's all inhouse, and outgoing VOIP calls will be relatively cheap.
     
  8. Iceman

    Iceman Member

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    Clearly this isn't for you, the purpose of those numbers is to provide more traffic to your business by providing a 1) local call or free call (13/1800) number to your clients, nationally. 2) Potentially also providing an easy to remember number eg 1800-cal-lme (225-563).

    If your business can't leverage even $200 of value from this service.. well.. instead of reading this thread your time would be more valuable elsewhere.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  9. Primüs

    Primüs Member

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    13/1800 numbers have the nice feature of being portable as well. If you move offices to a different town etc, sometimes, depending on how far you move, it can be difficult to retain your landline number. By having the 13/18 number you simply repoint to a new endpoint number, problem solved.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    -Sk3tChY-

    -Sk3tChY- Member

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    Thanks guys.

    I contacted Telecube and they said they can get me the number I want for free in 1800, unfortunately for 1300 I would have to pay $250. :thumbdn:

    I've decided (at least for now) that I'll grab the 1800 number for free and see how I go.

    It costs a little more per month than the 1300 number, but the call rates are exactly the same and hopefully the fact it's a free call might make it more enticing to potential customers.

    After looking around a bit though I noticed a lot of companies (even the larger ones) seem to sport a 1300 number rather than a 1800, any reason why that might be? :confused:

    I took a look at going the VOIP option, but given the current situation a 1800 number looks to be cheaper.
     
  11. mjunek

    mjunek Member

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    We pay a flat monthly fee for our 1300's, plus diffences in costs for mobile/internationals calling us. So it doesnt matter who calls us from a landline, we dont pay for it.
    With a 1800 number, being free for the caller, we would have to pay ALL associated call costs. So STD rates for Non-Sydney numbers, local call rates for local numbers, etc. It adds up quite quickly if you have a large volume of inbound calls.

    Most people calling your service dont mind paying the 20-25c for the local call to a 1300 number (from landline), over a free call 1800 number, so why would a company want to foot more of the bill?

    Hope that ramble makes sense! :)
     

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