How do I fix this toy camera with soldering?

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by Multiplexer, May 25, 2021.

  1. Multiplexer

    Multiplexer Member

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    The battery wire is disconnected from the toy camera, I need to connect it back to the negative.

    I have a Hakko FX888D.

    Anyone able to give me guidance on how to fix it? What temp I should set the FX888D to? how do I avoid the core wire getting to the positive?

    Would like to use this opportunity to teach my kids and knowledge they maybe able to use in the future.

    http://users.tpg.com.au/platinum822/camera.jpg
    http://users.tpg.com.au/platinum822/wire.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2021
  2. Renza

    Renza Member

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    Lead free solder is not easy to work with. i think 250c might do it, but increase it until it melts.

    'tin' the pads where you want to connect the negative wire by heating up the pad with the iron and feeding a bit solder to melt it. then do the same with the wire. then melt the solder on the pads and bring the wire to melt the solder together. Take the iron away but don't move the wire until it's cooled a little so you don't get a bad connection.

    just don't heat up the pad where the negative wire is.

    plenty of soldering videos on youtube. my techniquie may not be the best but it works for me
     
  3. dakiller

    dakiller (Oscillating & Impeding)

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    Put flux on the wire, then solder on the wire to tin it.

    Dab of flux on the pcb too, then melt the solder on the pcb while sticking the wire into it. If the solder bridges, more flux and melt it again and it’ll unstick

    300-350c will do the job
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Multiplexer

    Multiplexer Member

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    What is? Sorry not familiar with terminology.
    Tin, Pads and Flux
     
  5. Benno1988

    Benno1988 Member

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    Tin means to get the wire end to sick up some solder first

    Pad is the contact you're trying to solder the wires to

    Flux is what prevents oxidation, allowing solder to stick to things. Most solder wire has flux in it.

    If youre not too good with the fine touch, you can jam a wooden toothpick between the contacts to stop the solder bridging over. Crude but works.
     
  6. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Hit youTube for introductory soldering vids.

    If the large square pad directly next to the negative pad is connected to the negative pad, nothing stopping you from giving yourself some wriggle extra room and soldering the wire onto the square one.

    Your piccy is too blurry to confirm the connection, but if you haven't got a multimeter to check then eyeball 'n see if there's a track/track directly 'tween those two pads. If there is then you're golden.

    And once you've soldered it back on, dabs of nail varnish/polish make a simple strain relief for the wires... ;)
     
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  7. OP
    OP
    Multiplexer

    Multiplexer Member

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    Thanks for the info. I have watch some youtube, few good one but found mostly assume knowledge like the term.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Multiplexer

    Multiplexer Member

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    After I finish finish, do I clean then leave solder to coat the tip?
     
  9. Myne_h

    Myne_h Member

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    Flux = almost pine smelling goo that magically makes solder more like water on wax.

    Solder you have.

    Tinning = adding a bit of solder to the thing you want to solder. Ie you'd tin a bare copper wire.

    Personally, I'd go get some copper braid, some, Lead solder, flux, and isopryopl.

    Then practice wicking on some old junk you don't want to repair, then practice soldering on the same junk.

    When you think you can reasonably consistently get a nice, shiny liquid-shaped connection, then grab the camera.

    Surely you have something electronic that's totally broken laying around?
     

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