How long do GPUs last?

Discussion in 'Video Cards & Monitors' started by spotted, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. spotted

    spotted Member

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    I see some GPU on sale used for mining. Do they wear our or are those fans likely to die?

    I used to always buy last-gen fanless GPUs, the last I bought was like 6yrs ago. Now they don't seem to exist and I'm not sure about buying GPUs that cost as much as my CPU.
     
  2. argent

    argent Member

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    Generally with buying ex-mining gear, the main thing to look out for is failing bearings on cooler fans I think. There's also a possibility of degraded VRM/caps etc due to possible lack of airflow in general but this is less of a problem as typically they are made to withstand high temps.
     
  3. wintermute000

    wintermute000 Member

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    Isn't there a school of thought that mining is better than gaming as they're likely to be undervolted, cooled and run at constant temp?

    Anyhow anecdotally I've lost 2 GPUs after around 3-4 years whilst the others have kept on trucking until sold or binned, so make of that what you will. But I sell everything the moment I upgrade so yeah maybe all the others died a week after I flogged them and I'll never know LOL.

    Even if its been mined if you have receipt/warranty then surely you're still good under the warranty period?
     
  4. FOTW

    FOTW Member

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    Someone who knows how to mine will undervolt a card to reduce the electricity bill and run the card cooler. So theoretically they should last longer then someone who overclocked theirs for gaming.

    Allot of manufactures offer 3-5 years warranty any way so unless someones messed with the cards physically any failure may still be covered.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    spotted

    spotted Member

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    That's interesting. Why do they keep buying new cards every 6mth if they mine?
     
  6. 2_stroke

    2_stroke Member

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    I would jump on a bitcoin forum and ask most questions, you will probably getting some interesting facts, there a crypto section here to
     
  7. Sunder

    Sunder Member

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    Personally, I'm not sure I would buy an ex-mining card unless it was really cheap.

    In the early days of overclocking (Talking 20+ years ago), there used to be talk about electromigration, and the impact higher voltages, higher frequencies, and higher temps, and higher loads would have on CPUs. Those were the days before you'd bounce of enforced TDP limits, and you changed the voltages in tenths of volts, not hundredths. Back in those days, if you overclocked too hard, you could have a stable overclock one day, and get random reboots the next, and weeks later, have an unusable PC. That was electromigration at work.

    Anyway, long story short, is that when electrons move along a conductor, some of the metal atoms can slightly move. It's trivial and not worth considering in terms of overall life. Usually you would say most microelectronics would have a life of over 10 years.

    When you over current, and overheat, that process is significantly accelerated. In the case of first generation celerons - substantially. Now with all the self protecting limits on GPUs, who knows? Maybe there's a reason why Pascal had such a low power limit that couldn't be changed without a BIOS hack, was that it was near the edge of a cliff - 7 years MTBF one side, 1 year MTBF the other?

    There's no doubt that running GPUs on high load wears them - but wears them compared to what, and does it matter? 24 hours a day undervolted and underclocked, or 2 hours a day overvolted and overclocked? Or a stock card that is always left on, but almost always in 2D mode? Or a gaming machine on for 4 hours a night on weekends only? It's all random and unpredictable.

    My guess - and this is only a guess, is that you're not going to have a lot of problem with ex-miner cards... But they're usually not any cheaper than just 2nd hand cards used for gamers anyway. There's going to be a lot of people not declaring that their card is ex-miner, just like there's plenty who won't declare they used to over-clock. I use my computer a LOT - for work, for gaming, for entertainment. I'm the kind of person that would rather pay a little extra to avoid losing my PC for 2-3 days waiting on a replacement, than to save $100-200. I avoid 2nd hand in general, unless I know its providence, but would avoid ex-miner kit.
     

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