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How many computers can i plug into one power outlet?

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by ChEEkY ChiNo, Jun 1, 2003.

  1. pOpArOb

    pOpArOb Member

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    I must have replied somewhere because i got pinged for this thread D:
     
  2. MacroP

    MacroP Member

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    Yep - you said "how many computers u recon I could run in my lil trailer at the local trailor park ??" Hahahaha
     
  3. Symon

    Symon Castigat ridendo mores

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    Might have difficulty getting everyone - look at how many posters aren't active on the forum any more...
     
  4. sbadman

    sbadman Member

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    Wish I hadn't taken it TBH, I can't believe half the crap I just read!

    Mr 'use double adapters for everything' has probably burnt his house down by now :D
     
  5. OP
    OP
    ChEEkY ChiNo

    ChEEkY ChiNo Member

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    Hahaha WOW 10 years later.!! Just had a look at my current power board and im daisy chaining 2x 5 plug power boards off 1 power point.

    Running
    Laptop
    Speakers
    Router
    External HDD
    Heater
    Fan (not in use atm)
    Clothes Dryer

    No issues there but I dont think they use much power

    GO OCAU!
     
  6. OP
    OP
    ChEEkY ChiNo

    ChEEkY ChiNo Member

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    Thread creator is still here ;)
     
  7. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

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    That's pushing the friendship.

    2.
     
  8. Brandon_Sydney

    Brandon_Sydney New Member

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    Hello

    Hi Cheeky Chino,

    According to me every computer keeps a label behind it with amperage rating of the system which can help you identify how much power each machine consumes, same with monitors. You can add their amperage and get rough idea out of how much power is one machine consuming. It is always advised, not to exceed 20 amps per circuit.
     
  9. Dice

    Dice Member

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    According to me a piece of string is about this big. You can add pieces of string together and make rope. It is always advised, not to tow happy furniture.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    ChEEkY ChiNo

    ChEEkY ChiNo Member

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    Lol I would think so too, didnt think about it till now though.. Hmmm lol. I'm suprised that it's been handling fine all these years.
     
  11. sbadman

    sbadman Member

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    Couple of bigger loads there, but at least with a powerboard, the worst that will happen if you did happen to go over 10A is the first boards overload will trip out. You simply turn something off, push the button back in, and Chino stays cheeky :)

    With double adapters....well...

    http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-photo-6350192-burnt-powerpoint.php
     
  12. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

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    Ever tried that?
    You'd be surprised how long you can run a 15A welder through a 10A power-board before it trips.

    Relying on a 20c part in a $5 board to save you from yourself seems a little .... naive.

    2.

    btw, that pic doesn't look like an overloaded powerpoint.
    It looks like the heat source was external. Without the story, it's pretty meaningless.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  13. sbadman

    sbadman Member

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    Welders have a duty cycle (albeit variable depending on the job at hand), a pair of radiant or fan heaters with no thermostat (as an example) don't. And even the most expensive circuit breakers have a time curve.

    As opposed to a double adaptor which probably has 20c worth of parts in total, I'd rather take my chances with the power board.

    Valid point, and I don't disagree with you. But I only had a few minutes before my lunch break was ending, so it was the first option at hand to get a basic point across. Overloading = bad!
     
  14. Turbine

    Turbine Member

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    Started reading from the start and was wondering why everyone was talking about 17" monitors and XP2400+ cpus. :D:thumbup:
    I think nowdays 1A per pc doesn't really cut it, nearer to 2A to be safe for a bunch of people gaming...
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  15. TRG.dOinK

    TRG.dOinK Member

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    Doesn't matter how many points you have, the maximum power rating for the entire line is 2400 Watts (10A socket/line).

    For example, you could have 2,400 fans running on one plug each if they only drew 1 Watt each.

    Just try not to overload the line, check the rating of all the devices and add them up. More than likely, you probably aren't going to use all of them at once though.
     
  16. desertstalker

    desertstalker Member

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    Done that, old 2400W bar heater on full + a pair of desk lamps (80W total) = tripped breaker on power board (it worked fine without the lamps) almost immediately. They seem pretty sensitive and trip fairly fast.

    Chances are a 15A welder is not generally drawing 15A constantly considering how many seem to like filing down the earth pin and running them on 10A sockets.
     
  17. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

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    It was pulling it's max capacity while hard facing (not stop-start welding).

    There was only one outlet available (happened to be 15A). So a 10A board got plugged in and several things ran off that.

    2.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    ChEEkY ChiNo

    ChEEkY ChiNo Member

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    Yeah simply put. I don't use any double adapters in the boards so I guess that's good. But don't think any of the boards have ever tripped either. Cheeky ;)
     
  19. munchkin1

    munchkin1 Member

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    Lol coincidentally I just read this thread and about a month ago I replaced my epic daisy chain of ancient powerboards with about 5 double adapters in the mix, for 2x8way quality boards, one of them daisy chained to a second 8 way and put away the double adapters.

    Bedroom has too much crap in it and only 2 wall sockets, however I have the most power hungry devices (computer+monitors/TV+home theatre) evenly distributed so wouldn't be over 2400w per outlet(not even close). Most sockets taken up by low power devices e.g. printer, 2xrouters (cable modem router+central house router in my room...) clock radio, external HDD etc...I'm guessing a lot of other nerds around here would have similar issues with heaps of low power devices requiring a heap of power points heh.

    As a side note we have 3 phase at home. It's used for the ducted aircon, and I think the pool pump too. It's shown quite clearly on the safety switches so that should be an easy way to check if others are wondering if they have it.
     
  20. Exige

    Exige (Banned or Deleted)

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    You can pull more than 2400 watts per power point, but that is simply because on your household circuits you will have a 15amp circuit breaker (now 16amps). As for distributing the more hungry units between power points it may not matter if your room is wired on the same circuit (depending on how the house is wired.

    In our kitchen we have a new fridge, a microwave and a dishwasher. If the fridge compressor kicks in while the dishwasher and microwave is going it will kick the circuit breaker. This is because my brother in law's room is on the same circuit, and he needs the heater for winter. Combine the fact that the lounge room is on the same circuit and you have an unfortunate combination of power hungry devices on the same circuit.
     

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