I knew this was going to happen to Ubuntu

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by foxmulder881, Sep 20, 2008.

  1. foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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  2. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    I see no problem, for legal reasons it is a smart move to satisfy US regulations, SUSE do the same, they just include the license with the cost of purchase.
     
  3. OP
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    foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    But my point is; it shouldn't come to this.

    As quoted in the aforementioned article:

    Why do I quote this?
    1. We do have a computer that we own.
    2. We do have the media that we own.
    3. We should have the right to view it freely without having to pay for further codecs.
     
  4. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Then I guess your gripe would be with the copyright holders of the MP3 and DVD codecs that use the copyright laws to get royalty payments for its use.

    It is illegal to supply DVD playback without paying a royalty fee, and with Ubuntu being a FREE product as in 0 revenue it would be financial suicide to pay that fee with no revenue. If you feel that this is unfair or unjust then you can campaign to have the copyright and patent laws changed, there are lots of organizations that you can join.

    Owning the media doesn't give you any rights, other than to view the content, in the format that it was purchased, same with music.
     
  5. toastman

    toastman Member

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    Nothing is stopping users from using restricted/multiverse repositories, which I believe have most of these codecs.This is Canonical's way of providing an option for a 100% legal desktop that can playback media.

    But VLC seems to play everything I need to play, so unsure who'd need to buy these..
     
  6. houseofzeus

    houseofzeus Member

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    None of the above give Canonical the right to intentionally violate the licenses of those producing the codecs which is why they have chosen to go down this path to show they are doing 'the right thing'.

    Realistically it's just to keep them out of legal trouble, the majority of users will continue to get the codecs from un-official sources.
     
  7. OP
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    foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    Let me be clear. Yes, true. My gripe is with the proprietary codec holders. :mad:

    Yeah I know. But it shouldn't be. :mad:

    Yeah but don't you find that absolute crap and ridiculous?!? To "legally" view the content you've purchased, you must pay more money to "legally" watch it... even though you've bought it! Fuck me. It's the most ridiculous concept that I've ever come across in my life. :mad:

    That's exactly right. And I do get all the codecs from the repos. And I won't be paying for any in the future either. :Pirate: Not because I'm a tight arse, but for the reasons above.

    VLC :thumbup::thumbup:
     
  8. checkers

    checkers Member

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    Yeah, you're right - this a personal bug bear of mine too. To take an anlogy from another sector: You buy a car. You get a car license. But you have to pay for petrol to use your car! Money grubbing bastards, petrol should be free!
     
  9. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    Certainly is crazy, but you've supported the idea by buying DVDs, using the MP3 format, and various other things no doubt (as have all of us). Maybe time to start doing yourself a favour, and purchasing your media in open formats (yes I know this is practically impossible for movies).

    I don't even blame the people who hold "ownership" of the formats either, it's the bloody music/movie companies deciding to use them.
     
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    foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    It's a particularly foolish comment then don't you think? :Paranoid:
     
  11. houseofzeus

    houseofzeus Member

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    No more foolish than thinking that companies are going to stop producing media that is hamstrung in this manner if consumers keep buying data stored on them regardless.
     
  12. The Sentinel

    The Sentinel Member

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    I really only see this as an advantage to people such as post number 5) in the link. i.e. those people wishing to run it in a business or some other "totally-legit" </end air-quotes> installations.

    If paying for the license(s) bothers people so much, why not just download the codecs from elsewhere.
    People who are pissed off by this new licensing scheme were not likely to use licensed codecs anyway so can continue to source them from the usual 'verses.
     
  13. Oblong Cheese

    Oblong Cheese Member

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    I think I'm going to start the arduous task of re-ripping all my CDs into FLAC format.

    This move is ... decent. I think it's a "one step back, two steps forward" approach -- bowing to the copyright holders and paying royalties on software patents is one thing, but the number of people who can now live with peace in mind playing their mp3s and DVDs on their favourite operating system... that's another.

    I don't agree that such fees should be paid, but the fact is: they have to be. So Canonical are doing that, and they're providing a mechanism to their users to enable this content. It's another barrier to the big bad Linux which has been ripped down. While people are enjoying their mostly F/LOSS ride with Ubuntu, maybe they'll take the time to consider alternative formats. Even if they don't, they're still using Ubuntu, and legally accessing their media. It's a win-win, really.
     
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    foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    Problem is, people really don't care at the end of the day what format their new DVD is encoded in. Hell, they don't even understand the words "format" and "encode". We're a small minority (unfortunately) in this big evil world.
     
  15. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    It is? I was under the impression that DeCSS and other free DVD decryption schemes where perfectly legal in this country. Is that not the case?
     
  16. koopz

    koopz Member

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    people will vote with thier feet...

    it's not hard to see what will come of this
     
  17. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    I'm no legal eagle, but yes in the US it is, and since our "free" trade agreement with America has basically left us with total adaptation of the US copyright/protection laws I would hazard a guess that it is now illegal.

    1 more point on this topic, Conical are doing this to appease the US law makers, and as I stated earlier Novell/SUSE already cover the MP3 and DVD playback license in the cost of ownership.

    Also foxmulder881 your anger should be vented at your hardware supplier for not suppling DVD playback software in a Linux friendly format, as most DVD devices come with some software bundle.
     
  18. Blinky

    Blinky Member

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    If you are suggesting a loss of popularity with Ubuntu... - Nup.
    All major distros will fall into line eventually anyway. As it's been said before, it's a safeguard more than anything else. Didn't Fedora drop mp3 a while back from the native environment for similar reasons?

    I don't see this as an OS breaker at all.

    Edit: At this stage there does not seem to be a 64bit option to purchase anyway or will the 32 bits ones work? What are you meant to do for encoding, as they seem to be playback only?
    https://shop.canonical.com/product_info.php?products_id=244&osCsid=164d1578dc2b22131cc3a8ecc40efb5f
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2008
  19. SchRAMBO

    SchRAMBO Member

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    Not terribly surprising really. Although I havent had the need to watch DVDs on my desktop and laptop in the last few years. It's not that hard to grab Xine and the required libraries and install to get DVD playback. much the same with MP3. I just advoid using mp3 whenever I can and go for the .ogg when ripping my CDs.

    What I want to know is whats the status of blu-ray playback in linux? is there propietry codecs / support out yet and / or is there a cracked method?
     
  20. koopz

    koopz Member

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    are you referring to the corp or retail market?

    I'll generally load up about ~10 new servers a week with Ubuntu. On the job DVD playback is a non-issue for me obviously, as intended usage is all command line based.

    in the U.S consumer market Ubuntu is seeing success... and and that's where most of what we're discussing is taking place. Ubuntu compete directly with MS Windows Vista in the consumer market. is lack of free DVD playback something that will dissuade a consumer from continued consideration for a Ubuntu based PC over a Vista one? It sure is.

    There are lots of fickle reasons that consumers won't buy one item over another. this is just another one.


    //off topic for 2 seconds

    are you actually "45min Sth of Hob" as in Antarctica? I always wanted to sign up on one of the cargo ships that head down there but found myself working here on the mainland instead
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2008

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